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The Fantastical Adventures of the Invisible…
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The Fantastical Adventures of the Invisible Boy (original 2001; edition 2005)

by Lloyd Alexander

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219377,649 (3.77)6
Member:konallis
Title:The Fantastical Adventures of the Invisible Boy
Authors:Lloyd Alexander
Info:Usborne Publishing Ltd (2005), Paperback, 240 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:children's/young adult

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The Gawgon and the Boy by Lloyd Alexander (2001)

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Eleven-year-old David nearly died of pneumonia. During recovery Dr. McKelvie prescribes fresh air and “mild exercise” but no school. However, David mother accepts Aunt Annie’s offer to tutor him and mild exercise turns out to include more than lounging around reading books about pirates, sneaking into theaters to see "the new films that actually talk", and writing up clever cartoons about the "Sea-Fox," the devilishly devious scourge of the Spanish Main. This horrible old Gorgon or “Gawgon” by some proves to impress David --whom she takes to simply calling "The Boy" after she learns about her nickname- and begins to co-star in his time hopping, globetrotting adventure stories.

This story was a bit confusing at first but got better and more interesting as the plot continued. This is defiantly a story for the older reader (10 and up). After struggling through I did end up liking the story.

This book would be very difficult to use in a classroom but it could be used to challenge an advanced reader. It could also be use for some creative writing stories using real people.
  MOster | Oct 7, 2009 |
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For those with a Gawgon of their own, and those who wish for one.
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When I first met The Gawgon, I never suspected who she was: climber of icy mountains, rescuer of King Tut's treasure, challenger of master criminals, and a dozen other things.
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0525466770, Hardcover)

Eleven-year-old David nearly died of pneumonia. ("New Monia," as his Aunt Rosie called it with her heavy British accent, not unlike the "Spanish Influenzo.") But all that bed rest would have been worth it if it meant he could escape Rittenhouse Academy and continue on among the rogues' gallery of eccentric friends and relatives that passes through his family's Philadelphia home. David (also known as "Bax," "Skeezix," "Skinamalink," Snicklefritz," and "First Sergeant," depending on which grownup is doing the addressing) decides that he'd be more than happy to wile away his days with some fresh air and "mild exercise," as prescribed by Dr. McKelvie (who, incidentally, calls David "laddie-buck").

But mild exercise turns out to include more than lounging around reading books about pirates, sneaking into theaters to see "the new films that actually talk" (this being right before the Depression), and writing up clever cartoons about the "Sea-Fox," the devilishly devious scourge of the Spanish Main. No, David is to have a tutor. (A "tooter," says Aunt Rosie, to keep him from becoming an "ignoramiss.") And it could be a worse fate than David ever imagined, maybe even worse than Rittenhouse: his stern, elderly Aunt Annie volunteers for the job. "In a tone that made me think of the Almighty commanding Abraham to sacrifice young Isaac, she said: 'Give me the boy.'"

But this horrible old Gorgon (Aunt Rosie translation: "Gawgon") proves to be David's perfect foil, an ingenious mentor who so impresses David--whom she takes to simply calling "The Boy" after she learns about her nickname--that she begins to co-star in his time-hopping, globe-trotting adventure stories. The Gawgon and the Boy offers excellent period details, hysterical dialogue, and convincingly funny and authentic 11-year-old imaginings from Newbery Medal and National Book Award winner Lloyd Alexander. (Ages 10 and older) --Paul Hughes

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:11:15 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

In Depression-era Philadelphia, when eleven-year-old David is too ill to attend school, he is tutored by the unique and adventurous Aunt Annie, whose teaching combines with his imagination to greatly enrich his life.

(summary from another edition)

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