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Linger Awhile by Russell Hoban
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Linger Awhile

by Russell Hoban

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Images from Russell Hoban's children's story "A Mouse and His Child" have haunted me all my life, so I was curious to see what his writing for adults would be like.

Well, the language is coarser, and the theme is sex, but there is the same bittersweet sense of longing, hope and regret that I remember. Russell Hoban has the gift of making even the sordid seem poetic, and his characters have a humanity that makes them real, even amongst the most absurd flights of fantasy. ( )
  Guanhumara | Mar 25, 2016 |
"Linger Awhile," written in 2006 was Hoban's 14th novel.
In his acknowledgments he said, "I find it impossible to stop writing, and I hope that Liz Calder, my publisher, may be forgiven for supporting my addiction."

My paperback edition's cover shows ten snippets of praise from press reviews, calling it "an adult fairytale," "magical fantasy," and the author "the best sort of genius."
I am an unabashed Hoban fan. My reaction to this action-packed book is difficult to express:
current news of three-D printing baffles me as does the book's reconstruction of a woman long-dead.
It's difficult to blame a woman for misdeeds that are due to her basic needs. Blame instead the men who set up her impossible situation.

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On page 44 one of the characters says, "I just dropped in to see what condition my condition was in."
Did the Coen brothers read this before they made "The Big Lebowski"? ( )
  Esta1923 | Mar 11, 2014 |
This is the weirdest vampire story I've ever read, and I've read a lot of them. ( )
  JeremyPreacher | Mar 30, 2013 |
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added by Guanhumara | editThe Guardian, Patrick Ness (Dec 24, 2005)
 
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"When Irving Goodman falls in love with Justine Trimble he is close to the end of his life and she's been dead for forty-seven years. Irving may not know how he's going to attain his heart's desire but he knows a man who does." "Justine was a star of 1950s black-and-white westerns, an expert horsewoman much admired for her seat, and when Istvan Fallok, a wizard of high technology, sees her in Irving's video of Last Stage to El Paso, he hi-techs Justine out of the videotape and into present-day Soho - in black-and-white. It's amazing what you can do with magnetised particles in a suspension of disbelief." "As any reader of Bram Stoker will know, blood is the (full-colour) life. Istvan is Justine's first donor but, in order not to be walking around in black-and-white, she has to be topped up now and then - by Irving and his friends and the odd passer-by. Not surprisingly, the curiosity of the police is soon aroused." "Things become a little complicated when Grace Kowalski brings a Justine Two into the picture. Where will this all end? Linger Awhile and find out."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

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