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Into the Fire by Richard Laymon
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Into the Fire (original 2005; edition 2006)

by Richard Laymon

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164None73,406 (3.75)3
Member:Skaidon
Title:Into the Fire
Authors:Richard Laymon
Info:Leisure Books (2006), Mass Market Paperback
Collections:Your library
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Into the Fire by Richard Laymon (2005)

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Showing 4 of 4
This was typical Laymon. It was an interesting thriller, but so sick and twisted. If you get sick or creeped out easily, don't read Richard Laymon's books. If you love a good thriller and don't mind the gore and sex, his books are great. ( )
  ladybug74 | Aug 12, 2010 |
An uneven effort by Richard Laymon, Into the Fire feels like a shotgun marriage of two different novellas. Pamela's storyline is mildly interesting and creepy, while the portion of the book belonging to Norman borders on obnoxious and unbelievable. I have to think that even the most hormone-stricken teenage boy (a Laymon hallmark) would have exercised better judgment than Norman, who apparently will do anything for a little bit of action from a woman he claims to detest. Norman and company's interlude at a motel owned by the retired cast of a TV drama was especially bizarre and did little to move the story along. ( )
  Wova4 | Sep 2, 2009 |
Originally published outside of North America as “The Glory Bus”, which is a far better and more original name and apparently had a better cover as well. Laymon does cannibals, this time in a rather dull and lame fashion.
Sorry Richard (dare I speak ill of the dead), not your best. ( )
  youthfulzombie | Feb 3, 2008 |
The old saying is "out of the frying pan and into the fire"; this is the inspiration for Richard Laymon's title and the situation that his protagonist Pamela is thrust into. As the book opens, Pam is in a nasty situation. She has just been kidnapped by Rodney, a man who has been obsessed with her since high school. He's killed her husband and is going to take Pam to a remote hideaway where he intends for them to live happily ever after. Fortunately, Rodney will be killed into the opening chapters and Pam will wind up with a mysterious stranger named Sharpe. If Rodney is the frying pan, Sharpe is potentially the fire.

Sharpe takes Pamela to a small desert town called Pits, population six. Most of the others in the town are also people Sharpe has rescued over the years; while they all seem welcoming, Pam senses something strange about the town and its people. Soon enough, she will encounter the truth, but what she does after that is a little out of the ordinary.

In a parallel story, college student Norman is on his way home when he winds up forced into the company of Duke, a rather amiable psychopath. Soon, they have another companion, the hitchhiking Boots, a woman of, shall we say, loose morals who is not above any crime. Eventually, Norman is on a crime spree with the two, a spree in which he begins to enjoy himself more and more (along with Boots's sexual favors). In fact, it is debatable as to who is the more truly evil: Duke with his forthright malice or Norman who hypocritically thinks he is above his companions even as he commits his crimes; Duke and Boots, however, are irrevocably evil; Norman may still be redeemable. Their flight from the law will eventually bring them to Pits. ( )
  tanthonyam | Mar 27, 2007 |
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The old saying is "out of the frying pan and into the fire"; this is the inspiration for Richard Laymon's title and the situation that his protagonist Pamela is thrust into. As the book opens, Pam is in a nasty situation. She has just been kidnapped by Rodney, a man who has been obsessed with her since high school. He's killed her husband and is going to take Pam to a remote hideaway where he intends for them to live happily ever after. Fortunately, Rodney will be killed into the opening chapters and Pam will wind up with a mysterious stranger named Sharpe. If Rodney is the frying pan, Sharpe is potentially the fire.

Sharpe takes Pamela to a small desert town called Pits, population six. Most of the others in the town are also people Sharpe has rescued over the years; while they all seem welcoming, Pam senses something strange about the town and its people. Soon enough, she will encounter the truth, but what she does after that is a little out of the ordinary.
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One moment Pamela is a contented newlywed with a loving husband a comfortable home. The next, she's a prisoner of a repulsive killer who has lusted after her since high school - and now intends to make her his slave for life. Norman is a college kid and bad-boy Duke and Boots a hyper-sexed hitchhiker are in the car with him, Together the lawless pair take him on a wild journey that heading straight for the electric chair...............… (more)

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