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Practice Makes Perfect by Julie James
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Practice Makes Perfect (edition 2009)

by Julie James

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3022037,080 (3.98)17
Member:FictionDB
Title:Practice Makes Perfect
Authors:Julie James
Info:Berkley (2009), Paperback, 304 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:None

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Practice Makes Perfect by Julie James

Recently added byAcmStruga, Tinne.Joosen, SofiaHarper, private library, ellew1, msralways, owtpalready, BillieBook
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  1. 00
    It Happened One Autumn by Lisa Kleypas (Caramellunacy)
    Caramellunacy: Different subgenres of romance - Practice Makes Perfect is a contemporary romantic comedy about two lawyers vying for the same promotion, while It Happened One Autumn is a historical romance set at a house party, but both stories have a bickering, bantering couple whose fencing with words masks a deep-seated attraction. I found both stories hilarious and emotionally satisfying.… (more)
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Showing 1-5 of 20 (next | show all)
Fun! Predictable, but mostly in a good way. Payton and J.D. are a bit too perfect, of course. The P&P element seemed a bit labored.
  rmaitzen | Feb 7, 2014 |
I've read all of Julie James' books and while this one was much more of a romcom than her others, it was still crazy good. There were parts that literally had me laughing out loud in public, and the ending is tender and sweet. James can do no wrong, in my opinion. She is a rock star. ( )
  CyndiTefft | Feb 6, 2014 |
I've only recently gotten into contemporary romance novels, and I'm still not 100% sure I like the genre. I will admit I have liked Julie James' books far more than others, but I also may be biased because they are generally set in Chicago, and I have a thing for books set in Chicago.

Anyway, after reading Practice Makes Perfect, I found myself wondering what exactly it is about contemporaries as a whole that bothers me. It isn't an outright annoyance, but more an annoying feeling at the back of my consciousness as I read. Romance novels all follow the same plot line, more or less, and have pretty stock characters, so why does setting matter so much? Then it occurred to me- in a historical romance, I expect an "old school" alpha male, because in all honesty, men were kind of dense and clueless and they looked down on women- it is just a fact of the time period. I'm not saying this is great behavior, or that I would appreciate it in real life, but it is easier for me to believe, and not think the hero is such an asshole.

However, when you take those stock characters- the dense, clueless men who look down on women- and put them in modern times, they generally come off as misogynistic and insulting. Which is frustrating, because I like a strong alpha male type as much as the next girl, but at the same time, I'd like them to be smart and respect women as well. I don't think the two things are mutually exclusive.

James does a good job of creating heros who don't come off as total asses. For the most part, I liked J.D., though I'll admit he did a few things that made me want to not like him (calling Payton a "feminazi, for example), he did change for the better as the book went on, and the transformation was more or less believable, and didn't seem too out of character. However, the one thing that really drove me up a wall, and which seemed like an unnecessary plot point was the backstory of J.D. telling their boss that he and Payton had slept together. That made me really really want to hate him, and I felt like she forgave him way too easily. That made me a bit angry. I feel like the plot could have done without that, because there was enough tension as it was.

One of my biggest issues with the book was the nature of the conflict set up between the two characters. Not only did it seem ridiculously implausible (though, I will admit to not knowing anything about law firms) but I couldn't anticipate an ending which would have made me happy. Obviously, there was a happy ending (it is a romance novel) and maybe it was clear to other readers, but I didn't especially like the tension leading up to it. A lot of that is because the conflict became a general men vs women conflict, and not a J.D. vs Payton conflict.

All in all, I did enjoy Practice Makes Perfect, and breezed through it. It was a fun read, and like her other books, I liked the interactions between the main characters.

If you haven't read anything of James', I would suggest starting with the FBI series first. But if you have read her books before, you will likely enjoy this one. ( )
  kateminasian | Sep 23, 2013 |
Funny novel with excellent banter. Fast paced and interesting. The supporting characters really made this shine. Recommended. ( )
  cranberrytarts | Sep 22, 2013 |
JD and Peyton have been playing the same game for years. Both Lawyers in the same firm, they have been desperate to be seen as the better employee since the day they were hired. Working longer hours, winning more cases and attracting bigger clients, the pair of them have always put work before life. Neither of them stopped to wonder why their biggest priority is infuriating each other. When they are put together on a case, the simmering tension becomes all out war, especially when they find out that there is only one spot for partner available, a spot both of them want. Cue stand up rows and sabotage which, while juvenile, were incredibly funny. After a while, it becomes clear that their feelings are much more than hatred. Nevertheless, both of them know that, with the threat of only one of them becoming partner, any relationship would be out of the question. Are they both happy to let their work dictate the rest of their life’s?

This is the first Julie James books I read and I adored it. Both characters had their flaws, but I enjoyed reading about the pair of them. JD fitted perfectly into the “Good Old Boy” club that is the lawyer’s world. With his posh suits, perfectly styled hair and privileged upbringing, he really couldn’t be distinguished from the crowd and sounded like a bit of a tool. However, with his difficult parents constantly on his back, I began to see him as a more likeable character. Peyton is a feminist with a chip on her shoulder. Convinced that everything comes down to gender and money, at times she really quite annoyed me. Again, once we got a peek past that veneer, I started to like her too. The antics that they got up to in the name of sabotage really were amusing (especially the courtroom scenes) and this alongside the witty banter made for a very funny read. My favourite scene was probably when Peyton is trying her sexual harassment case in front a 6-foot picture of a penis :D The image that this made in my head made me laugh out loud :D

Again, the secondary characters were fabulous, and were written more as plot devices to move the story forward rather than to steal the show. I liked this about these; there are far too many stories that I spend the entire time thinking, “I can’t wait for [his/her] book!” I enjoyed the fact that the friends and family were there merely to urge them towards the inevitable. I couldn’t see how everyone could come out happy, but hell it was a fun ride!
( )
  Scorchingrevs | Sep 21, 2013 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0425226743, Mass Market Paperback)

When it comes to the laws of attraction, there are no rules The battle between the sexes is about to make these two lawyers hot under the collar. Opposites collide when two lawyers try to make partner at the same firm. Payton Kendall is a feminist to the bone. Cocky J.D. Jameson was born privileged. But when they're asked to join forces on a major case, they gain a newfound awareness of each other's personal assets. The partnership spot will be offered to only one of them, though. The competition heats up. Sparks fly. Let the games begin.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 14:03:33 -0400)

"Payton Kendall and J.D. Jameson are lawyers who know the meaning of objection. A feminist to the bone, Payton has fought hard to succeed in a profession dominated by men. Born wealthy, privileged, and cocky, J.D. has fought hard to ignore her. Face-to-face, they are perfectly civil. They have to be. For eight years they have kept a safe distance and tolerated each other as coworkers for one reason only: to make partner at the firm. But all bets are off when they're asked to join forces on a major case..."--p.[4] of cover.… (more)

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