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Liberty and Tyranny: A Conservative Manifesto (original 2009; edition 2009)

by Mark R. Levin

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Member:cranmergirl
Title:Liberty and Tyranny: A Conservative Manifesto
Authors:Mark R. Levin
Info:Threshold Editions (2009), Hardcover, 256 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:hc, 2009

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Liberty and Tyranny: A Conservative Manifesto by Mark R. Levin (2009)

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Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
To Ed- Our Leader! Thank you for all you have done and are doing!
  efeulner | Mar 28, 2014 |
From 1776 to 1881, the U.S. founding fathers worked to draft and ratify a document that established a limited government that would bring together a confederation of the states. Their goal in limiting the scope of government power was to protect the sovereignty of states and maximize individual freedom. It quickly became evident that the powers granted the Continental Congress were simply too weak for effective governing and our current Constitution had to be drafted. Their desire for a limited government remained the same, though, and many on all side of the political spectrum have lost sight of this. Ronald Reagan famously said that "government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem." Too many feel that only government can solve all our problems, and this is exactly what Mark Levin addresses in his book Liberty and Tyranny.

Levin sets up most of the book as a differentiation between two imaginary characters, The Statist and The Conservative. He provides an eye-opening summary of the battle of principles being played out in our own time. The first several chapters cover Faith, The Constitution, and Federalism, but by chapter 7, we start to recognize the very things that are happening in the U.S. today. Here he addresses the welfare state being promoted by the current administration, and all progressives over the last 100 years.

"If the Statist were to devise a scheme whereby a grandparent would be stealing future earnings from his own grandchild, would the grandparent consent to such immoral behavior?"

If you think not, maybe you just aren't paying attention. This week the congress has been planning to raise the debt ceiling another $1.9 trillion to a total of $14.3 trillion. What's the plan here? Spend the government into the ground. Create total dependence on government. Remake the government in your own image. Google: Cloward and Piven, or Saul Alinsky

It's not just the massive spending programs that have taken place over the past year, but the unfunded liabilities from entitlement programs like Social Security. They've led people to believe that their taxes are being taken and put into a savings account on their behalf (that's what the privatization of social security would have done if the Dems hadn't killed it under Bush.) On the contrary, they simply take money from workers, write checks to retirees, and promise to pay workers back when it's their turn to retire. As of this writing, Social Security liabilities stand above $14 trillion. Total U.S. UNFUNDED liabilities stands over $107 trillion. If you're breathing and you are a U.S. citizen, you owe $347,000, even if you were literally born yesterday. Adding "free" health care into the mix is a guaranteed disaster. The last year should have been spent lowering taxes and allowing the private sector to create jobs, not raising taxes and spending more, while no jobs were created (or saved) and official unemployment soars past 10% (at least 17% when you add in people who have given up looking for a job).

Chapter 8 is about enviro-statism. Whenever someone says the debate is over, and the science is settled, be very skeptical. Global warming continues to crumble under the weight of its own cover-ups, and the "scientists" just yell louder that the debate is over, calling skeptics "deniers". They simply don't have the science to show the Earth is warming, let alone to show that it's man-made. The greenies have doubled down on their efforts towards environmental control, translated into control of YOU. Cap and trade will not have any effect on the environment. What it would do if passed is make people who are invested in "green technology" like Al Gore and General Electric rich, and force the working man to pay double for energy, and eliminate cheap energy needed for developing countries. More government control. Less freedom. Decreasing prosperity.

Chapter 9 is one of the most unsettling in the book. Illegal immigrants are literally changing the face and culture of the country. Continued unchecked mass immigration is unsustainable, just like current government spending. The preservation of our history and culture is impossible when illegals continue to flood over the border, refuse to assimilate or learn the language, set up their own communities, and reproduce at a rate higher than naturalized citizens, providing "anchor babies" in a distortion of U.S. law. It's estimated that 9 percent of the population of Mexico was living in the U.S. by 2004. For 40 years the flood has continued, and must be stopped. By the time 2010 is out, progressives will not doubt have a bill proposing citizenship for illegals who are already here. Those who began their association with the country by breaking the law, don't pay income taxes (the Fair Tax would force them to), and use facilities such as emergency rooms without paying, would become voters that ensure progressive (not to be confused with actual progress) control of government for generations to come.

After a chapter about gun control, Mark Levin ends his relatively small volume with about 10 pages summarizing the basic conservative position on various aspects of politics. His book provides a potent counterpoint to those to say conservatives are simply a party of "no". Look closer at those things to which we say "no": Change for the sake of change, a government that insists we push a $1 trillion health care bill through congress in a matter of weeks, unconstitutional government control, higher taxes, higher energy costs, inaction on illegal immigration.

Must read for any American who cares about their country. ( )
  BubbaCoop | Jan 22, 2010 |
This book offers a well-written, concise and easy to undestand summary of Mr. Levin's view of conservatism. It may or may not be anyone else's view, but it makes clear how he sees it. The chapter on immigration demonstrates the problem with Mr. Levin. So much of his political outlook matches so well the conservative's opinion, but his presentation is harsh, combative and radical in many ways. He is extreme, to say the least, and the modus of presentation of his arguments is generally arrogant and off-putting. Thus, few of those he attempts to influence, will listen or read him. ( )
  bigmoose | Jan 8, 2010 |
It's pretty much preaching to the choir. Good stuff but not at all surprising to someone who's been around conservatism for a few decades. It's probably a good summary of a lot of conservative thought for anyone who is new to it. ( )
  cozyreader | Jan 8, 2010 |
Awesome! This is a must read for every American. Mark Levin does an incredible job of presenting the facts and statistics in a way, which allows you to understand the context, and then the probable outcomes. One thing, that I think most people would agree with, is that the issue is not Republican or Democrat, the issue is our nation. We have too many politicians who are in it for themselves, not for the purpose of serving the people. Mr. Levin basically moves from one news story, article, study, etc to the next, and yet he does so in a way that is both easy to understand and entertaining. It's not just a bunch of dry facts, he has a way of putting "flesh" on the dry, hard facts (bones), so we can see what they mean, when combined with the big picture. ( )
1 vote WCallister | Oct 3, 2009 |
Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
"Mark Levin" whispers from the shadows. One feels the gentling hand of erudition in his prose. Reading his book is sort of like hearing "Animal Farm" as told by Dick Cheney.
added by Shortride | editSalon, Steve Almond (Sep 12, 2009)
 
Levin thinks there is nothing to learn from the present crisis, and indeed seems to regard the whole enterprise of learning as ideologically suspect. It’s very striking that nowhere in this book does he ever engage the ideas of intelligent people on the other side. He quotes stupid statements from a fringe group like Earth First! But he flinches from any encounter with any more substantial opponent. He lives in a sealed mental universe, into which nothing new or unsettling can ever penetrate.

I want to give Mark Levin some credit for Liberty and Tyranny. It is in its way an ambitious book, an attempt to offer a major political statement. Levin is not a stupid man, and Liberty and Tyranny is not a stupid book. What it is, unfortunately, is an airless and isolated book, an exercise in pure ideology radically quarantined from the life around it. It is a book for people on the defensive against contemporary society, people who have despaired of having much influence on the world around them. Liberty and Tyranny reveals the intellectual and psychological origins of the ferocious rage Levin broadcasts on his program. You can see why it appeals to conservatives now. You’ll know that conservatism is recovering when conservatives put it behind them.
added by TomVeal | editNew Majority, David Frum (Jun 11, 2009)
 
Mark Levin has written the necessary book of the Obama era. A book that he was born to write. Its best-seller success testifies not only to Levin’s smarts and popularity but also to the hunger in America for timeless conservative principles.
 
Inconsistency is the hallmark of Levin's thinking...Am I quibbling? No, I'm quitting Levin, tired of his love of contradiction.
 
Levin is not a dewy-eyed dreamer. His blueprint of solutions is ambitious not because it is instantly achievable but because our condition is dire. Among other things, he recommends ending the progressive income tax; a legislative veto over Supreme Court decisions; a yearly sunset of all federal agencies subject to congressional reauthorization; breaking government’s ruinous education monopoly; repealing chain immigration and multiculturalism in public institutions; slowly reforming entitlement programs by reversing the education system’s proselytism on their behalf; rejecting treaties and other international arrangements that encroach on U.S. sovereignty; a revitalization of the Constitution’s original limits of government power; and a restoration of faith’s rightful place as the source of rights the citizen cannot be denied. Like conservatism itself, it is the work of generations. And taking its lead from Mark Levin, it is not for the faint of heart.
 
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Epigraph
"We all declare for liberty, but in using the same word we do not all mean the same thing. With some the word liberty may mean for each man to do as he pleases with himself, and the product of his labor; while with others, the same word may mean for some men to do as they please with other men, and the product of other men's labor. Here are two, not only different, but incompatible things, called by the same name - liberty. And it follows that each of the things is, by the respective parties, called by two different and incompatible names - 'liberty' and 'tyranny'." - Abraham Lincoln, 1864
Dedication
To my family and fellow countymen
First words
So distant is America today from its founding principles that it is difficult to precisely describe the nature of American government. It is not strictly a constitutional republic, because the Constitution has been and continues to be easily altered by a judicial oligarchy that mostly enforces, if not expands, the Statist's agenda. It is not strictly a representative republic, because so many edits are produced by a maze of adminstrative departments that are unkown to the public and detached from its sentiment. It is not strictly a federal republic, because the states that gave the central goverment life now live at its behest.
Quotations
The Statist's counterrevolution has turned the instrumentalities of public affairs and public governance against the civil society. . . . More conservatives than before will need to seek elective and appointed office, fill the ranks of the administrative state, hold teaching positions in public schools and universities, and find positions in Hollywood and the media where they can make a difference in infinite ways.
The Statist urges Americans to view themselves through the lenses of of those who resent and even hate them. He needs Americans to become less confident, to doubt their institutions, and to accept the status assigned to them by outsiders - as isolationists, invaders, occupiers, oppressors, and exploiters. . . . They need to listen to the voices of condemnation from world capitals and self-appointed global watchdogs hostile to America's superior standard of living.
Academics help identify the enemies of the state, whom their students learn to distrust or even detest through distortion and repetition . . .
the Court not only denied the slave the ability to escape one state's tyranny for another state's freedom - a direct assault on a critical aspect of federalism, mobility - but it actually expanded slavery throughout the country, which helped precipitate the Civil War.
. . . the Enviro-Statist abandons reason for a faith that preaches human regression and self-loathing. . . . Most individuals who are sympathetic to environmental causes are unwitting marks, responsive to the Enviro-Statist's manipulation of science, imagery, and language. Over time, they will surrender liberty for authority, abundance for scarcity, and optimism for pessimism.
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A nationally syndicated talk radio host and author of Rescuing Sprite presents a volume of essays for today's conservative leaders that recommends specific approaches to such issues as immigration, health care, and foreign policy.

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