HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Chosen One by Carol Lynch Williams
Loading...

The Chosen One

by Carol Lynch Williams

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
82811315,689 (4.02)46
  1. 10
    Such a Pretty Girl by Laura Wiess (weener)
  2. 00
    Armageddon Summer by Jane Yolen (MyriadBooks)
    MyriadBooks: For the lack of adults who were supposed to protect you.
  3. 00
    Forbidden by Judy Waite (Runa)
  4. 00
    The 19th Wife by David Ebershoff (Maggie_Rum)
    Maggie_Rum: Both this book and The Chosen One portray stories of the danger of polygamy, especially to young women.
  5. 00
    Hush by Eishes Chayil (BookSpot)
    BookSpot: Both books deal with girls in insular religious communities that are not all that they appear to be from the outside. Both also deal with things that it's hard to imagine can be going on like that today but they do it well.
  6. 00
    Burned by Ellen Hopkins (meggyweg)
  7. 00
    The Patron Saint of Butterflies by Cecilia Galante (ForeignCircus)
    ForeignCircus: Another young adult novel about growing up in a religious cult and facing unbearable choices to further the greater good.
  8. 00
    Sister Wife by Shelley Hrdlitschka (meggyweg)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 46 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 117 (next | show all)
The Chosen One offers an insightful look into a religious cult and the realistic hold that it has on its people. Carol Lynch Williams suggests sexual abuse through forced marriage, but deals primarily with the physical abuse and the heavy emotional captivity.
I love the main character, Kyra. She is strongly determined, caring, and bookish.
The Chosen One reminded me of Keep Sweet by Michelle Greene, perhaps more than any other book has ever reminded me of another. I imagine that there are certain hallmarks of these cults that would make one similar to the other.
I think that it is important to remember that while The Chosen is written as fiction, these sort of religious cults are real and active today. These woman are often put in a positions where they have to choose whether to stay, or to leave their own children or siblings behind in order to save themselves. It is a horrific form of abuse. These girls are groomed their entire lives, and taught that it is all God ordained. ( )
  StephLaymon | Aug 12, 2018 |
Review: The Chosen One by Carol Lynch Williams. 4 Stars 01/11/2018

This type of story fascinates many readers. I’m one of the ones who is interested in the life of a polygamist cult but sometimes find them sad and disturbing. This story seems to show the internal emotions for a family while they still believed in their leader. The story is about a thirteen-year-old girl, Kyra who has one father, three mothers, and twenty siblings living in an isolated community led by a prophet that controls every aspect of their lives. There are a few detailed events that were disturbing and made me angry yet, I still read the story to the end….

Kyra is an introverted type of child and was always trying to isolate herself for comfort. She had a special tree she would climb and shaped a high branch into a quiet place where the leaves on the tree hid her away from the community. Kyra loved to walk past the perimeter allowed where they lived. She loved to walk into the desert to expand her limited area alone and feeling free to roam as she wanted. Kyra seemed to be able to voice her opinion when needed but most of the time with harsh situations to follow. One day the leader and his posse went to her family and told them that it was time for Kyra to marry. He chose her fathers older brother who was close to seventy and also had seven other wives. Her family tried to stand by her and her father even went to the leader and pleaded for this marriage not to take place. For Kyra her life was over and she ran away and caught by the leader’s posse and they beat to a pulp.

With secrecy she was able to make a friend who drove a book mobile to the city beyond but took time out to befriend and care for Kyra. It was sinful to read books so every week she would chose one from the book mobile and hide it under her skirt to read when she was in the comfort of her tree. She had also befriended a boy her age and they wanted to be together so the boy went to the leader and asked if he could marry her. Kyra was sent for to face the leader alone with no family members and the boy was there beaten beyond recognition and she received the same punishment, never to see the boy again and sent back to her father. Kyra went through hell but she was determined, angry and sadden to the core….. ( )
  Juan-banjo | Jan 21, 2018 |
Review for the audiobook version: The story is engaging, and the characters developed well enough for one to get quite attached. There are some you love, some you hate, and others that seem to have strong good and bad sides and one can't be sure how to feel about them. Really, just like real life. The end does stretch things a little, and I personally didn't care for the reader's voice as much as some others, but it's still engaging.

This is one of those YA books that deals with very real and very serious subject matter. It may be difficult for young readers to read about for that reason, and parents might want to be ready to turn it into a learning experience and have a serious talk with their children. There is serious violence involved, and discussion of young girls marrying and having children with middle-aged men (and older). It's very real and, while written for a YA audience, stays true to what's known to happen in many of those communities, which can make it truly upsetting at times. Overall, I'd consider it a worthwhile read for those who like YA books. ( )
  TiffanyAK | Nov 6, 2017 |
This is a very short read and definitely one you will want to do in one sitting. I seriously couldn't put this book down, because within those pages I saw myself. No, I haven't ever been in a polygamous community, nor have I been forced to marry my uncle, so I cannot really relate to the situation. However, I can see myself in Kyra. She questions everything and loves to read. Her voice was mine and I found myself lost in the tale because I felt as if I were living it. The author does a fantastic job connecting with the reader. She makes you stop and think, "What if this were me? What would I do?"

I really loved this book and will probably add it to my collection. This is one of those moments that I love the book so much that I doubt I will ever be able to adequately express through words what I am feeling. Just seriously go pick this one up.

The one thing I do have slight issue with is the cover. I love the symbolism of the braid coming undone, because Kyra's perspective completely shifts and her whole life comes undone. I do not like the fact she is in a spaghetti strap dress, because that isn't Kyra. She can't even imagine wearing something "that revealing." I think perhaps that was chosen because Kyra is becoming more "worldly" than before, but I don't think she is quite to that point by the end of the tale. I do think the colors on this cover are perfect because they seem a tad haunting as well.

Overall? 5/5 stars, because I connected with this tale and it has left me changed. ( )
  Emma_Manolis | Jun 27, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 117 (next | show all)
Kyra's terrible dilemma--escaping her fate means betraying her family--is heartbreakingly real, and the final scenes are riveting and suspenseful.
added by Katya0133 | editKirkus (Apr 1, 2009)
 
Williams’ portrayals of the family are sharp, but what’s most interesting about this book is how the yearnings and fears of a character so far from what most YAs know will still seem familiar and close.
added by Katya0133 | editBooklist, Ilene Cooper (Feb 15, 2009)
 
This page turner will appeal to all readers who enjoy fiction with an important message, combined with suspense and danger beautifully crafted within.
added by Katya0133 | editLibrary Media Connection, Judith M. Garner
 
The cinematic drama of [Alis and Kyra's] lives, not to mention the fact that they'd both feel at home in ''The Crucible,'' is a means to reach a quieter truth, revealing that moment in childhood when you recognize your thoughts as your own and discover forces in the world that your parents cannot -- or will not -- protect you from.
added by Katya0133 | editNew York Times Book Review, Jessica Bruder
 
Williams creates sympathetic characters, and readers will hold their breath right to the end, hoping that Kyra wins her freedom.
added by Katya0133 | editHorn Book Magazine, Chelsey Philpot
 
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
"If I was going to kill the Prophet," I say, not even keeping my voice low, "I'd do it in Africa."
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

In a polygamous cult in the desert, Kyra, not yet fourteen, sees being chosen to be the seventh wife of her uncle as just punishment for having read books and kissed a boy, in violation of Prophet Childs' teachings, and is torn between facing her fate and running away from all that she knows and loves.… (more)

» see all 3 descriptions

LibraryThing Early Reviewers Alum

Carol Lynch Williams's book The Chosen One was available from LibraryThing Early Reviewers.

Sign up to get a pre-publication copy in exchange for a review.

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.02)
0.5
1
1.5
2 10
2.5
3 49
3.5 25
4 122
4.5 28
5 75

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 128,123,285 books! | Top bar: Always visible