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The Paris Review Interviews III by The Paris…
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The Paris Review Interviews III

by The Paris Review

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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 031236315X, Paperback)

"I have all the copies of The Paris Review and like the interviews very much. They will make a good book when collected and that will be very good for the Review."--Ernest Hemingway

Since The Paris Review was founded in 1953, it has given us invaluable conversations with the greatest writers of our age, vivid self-portraits that are themselves works of finely crafted literature. From Salman Rushdie's daring rhetorical question "why shouldn't literature provoke?" to Joyce Carol Oates's thrilling comments about her own prolific output, The Paris Review has elicited revelatory and revealing thoughts from our most accomplished novelists, poets, and playwrights. How did Geroges Simenon manage to write about six books a year, what was it like for Jan Morris to write as both a man and a woman, what influences moved Ralph Ellison to write Invisible Man? In the pages of The Paris Review, writers give more than simple answers, they offer uncommon candor, depth, and wit in interviews that have become the gold standard of the literary Q&A. With an introduction by Margaret Atwood, this volume brings together another rich, varied crop of literary voices, including Martin Amis, Norman Mailer, Raymond Carver, John Cheever, Harold Pinter, and more. "A colossal literary event," as Gary Shteyngart put it, The Paris Review Interviews, III, is an indespensible teasure of wisdom from the world's literary masters.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:19:51 -0400)

The Paris Review was founded in 1953 and it has given us invaluable conversations with the greatest writers of our age, vivid self-portraits that are themselves works of finely-crafted literature. The magazine has spoken with most of the world's leading novelists, poets and playwrights, and the interviews themselves have come to be recognised as classic words of literature in their own right. This third volume in the series builds on the success and acclaim of the first two editions. It includes interviews with: Ralph Ellison; Salman Rushdie; Norman Mailer; Margaret Atwood; Chinua Achebe; and, Joyce Carol Oates, among many others.… (more)

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Canongate Books

An edition of this book was published by Canongate Books.

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