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Dog Talk: Training Your Dog Through A Canine…
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Dog Talk: Training Your Dog Through A Canine Point Of View

by John Ross

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636.7 ROS (1) animals (2) Be.rmd (1) dog (1) dogs (7) nonfiction animals (1) ofc1 (1) PLC (1) read (1) training (2)

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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0312117787, Hardcover)

The only dog-training book that really gets through to the canine brain beneath all that fur.

Incorporating the revolutionary teaching of John Ross's prominent dog-training school, this is the first and only dog-training book that truly takes owners inside the canine mind. Central to Ross's technique is the notion that a dog responds to its owner as the pack leader, and that this leader must take the dominant role in the relationship between human and dog. By encouraging owners to act in a canine manner, Ross emphasizes sure-fire techniques to help dogs through the behaviors they need to learn. Among the hundreds of useful training tips included in Dog Talk are:

* Always use your dog's name prior to the command: "Bentley, heel!"
* When training a puppy, try moving a desired object like a dog biscuit over and behind your dog's head to induce him to "sit."
* Do not use your dog's name-- which he associates with being called toward you-- when commanding him to "stay."
* Don't yell "Come!" in a threatening manner while chasing after a disobedient puppy or you may well have just trained him to run away on command.
* Giving a "No" command while your dog is thinking about a bad behavior is even more effective than giving it during the behavior.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:20:53 -0400)

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