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Living Dead Girl by Elizabeth Scott
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Living Dead Girl (2008)

by Elizabeth Scott

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
9871208,696 (3.88)49
  1. 40
    Room by Emma Donoghue (kaledrina)
  2. 10
    Stolen by Lucy Christopher (weener)
    weener: Living Dead Girl is a lot more graphic and disturbing than Stolen, but both are well-written, compelling tales of the relationship between kidnappers and their victims.
  3. 10
    What Happened to Cass McBride? by Gail Giles (weener)
    weener: Both about teenage girls trying to free themselves from extremely difficult situations.
  4. 10
    The Collector by John Fowles (guyalice)
  5. 00
    Scowler by Daniel Kraus (feeling.is.first)
    feeling.is.first: young adult horror, child abuse
  6. 00
    Dead to You by Lisa McMann (meggyweg)
  7. 00
    Counterfeit Son by Elaine Marie Alphin (meggyweg)
  8. 00
    I Choose to Live by Sabine Dardenne (meggyweg)
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» See also 49 mentions

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Whoa.
I think this is the most disturbing book I've ever read. I think so. I mean, I've read disturbing books before, but this is different for me, because it's contemporary and realistic fiction. It's raw and real and makes you see what is easier to ignore.

That's the message, I think - if there is one. That we/me/all of us ignore those things that are obvious and ugly and happening right before our very eyes. We go on about our business, though these atrocities happen every day. Tragically. This book makes you experience one such atrocity as it unfolds. It's rough.

The story is told in first person from the POV of a teenager who was abducted by a sick bastard as a little girl. I won't lie and tell you that this is easy to read. I like disturbing shit, I like dark shit, and I like sad shit. This was still hard for me to read. Not that I ever wanted to quit. Just that I would sometimes, seemingly unconsciously, turn away and try to busy myself with other things for a bit, because the content was hard to swallow. Despite how hard it is to read, it's harder to put down. I was completely riveted and anxious as the story progressed. Definitely kept me on the edge of my seat.

Scott did a great job of portraying the worst of the abuse in a very real and honest way without resorting to anything that could be viewed as gratuitous. She didn't shy away from the ugliness, but it's done well.

The thing that baffles me is that this is considered YA. I don't get that. I'm all for teens reading mature content (I did), but I feel like there should have been some message here that was more obvious. I’m okay with stories that don’t have a message, but if you’re going to gear this type of super-dark story towards teens, I think there should be a more clear message. That’s just my personal preference in teen fiction, though.

Disturbing and heartbreaking as fuck, but very well-written and morbidly fascinating.




( )
  JennyJen | Aug 14, 2014 |
I read the book hoping for a different ending than it had. Very creepy and not my style but very well written. It just wasn't for me. ( )
  Glennis.LeBlanc | Jul 8, 2014 |
“I have been smashed and put back together so many times nothing works right. Nothing is where it should be, heavy thumping in my shoulder where my heart now beats.”

I had heard Living Dead Girl by Elizabeth Scott described as disturbing but I really didn’t think it would bother me but, people, believe me when I say this book is very disturbing. A stark look at a young girl’s life after she has been abducted by a pedophile. She lives a life of terror and abuse that is very hard to read about. I think the author deserves kudos for delivering such a honest look at this brutal subject but the fact that this book is published as a YA is astonishing. I am not convinced that this is a YA book, at the very least I believe that a young girl would need a fair amount of discussion to understand what is going on here. I would definitely say this this is a book for the upper reaches of the YA audience.

The author pulls no punches as she tells Alice’s story in a unique style that is both riveting and effective. We are drawn into the mind of this young girl who has suffered not only physical and sexual abuse, but also has been physically forced to maintain a child’s body. Alice knows that there was a previous girl before her, and she knows that when that girl got too old she was murdered. Instead of scaring her, Alice longs for her time of release. When her abductor comes up with a plan for the two of them to kidnap another child, she is willing to go along with it in order to see the end of her suffering. It is chilling to read of how she helps to set up a young girl that she meets playing in a park, but at the same time, one can understand how she has been conditioned to help this monster.

I did not find that the author crossed any boundaries of taste, this is a difficult subject but one that we all know does happen. This is a short book but Living Dead Girl will be a book that I will not easily forget, and as a mother and grandmother I can only say that we can’t be vigilant enough with our young. ( )
1 vote DeltaQueen50 | Jan 11, 2014 |
Harrowing read. Scott gets Alice's voice and situation perfectly. The only reason I didn't finish in one sitting is that I had to leave the house and go out, and as it was I was late. ( )
  daniellnic | Sep 24, 2013 |
Pros:
* Incredibly hard to read
* Great use of an unreliable narrator
* Scary, thought provoking

Cons:
* Incredibly hard to read
* Horrible subject matter
* A lot of OMFG moments

Reading this was like watching a Law and Order: SVU episode from the victim's POV. Difficult subject matter handled in a beautiful and engaging way. ( )
1 vote ErikaWasTaken | Sep 22, 2013 |
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This is how things look: Shady Pines Apartments, four shabby buildings tucked off the road near the highway.
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"Once upon a time, I was a little girl who disappeared. Once upon a time, my name was not Alice. Once upon a time, I didn't know how lucky I was. When Alice was ten, Ray took her away from her family, her friends: her life. She learned to give up all power, to endure all pain. She waited for the nightmare to be over. Now Alice is fifteen and Ray still has her, but he speaks more and more of her death. He does not know it is what she longs for. She does not know he has something more terrifying than death in mind for her. This is Alice's story. It is one you have never heard, and one you will never, ever forget"--Book flap.… (more)

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