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The Glass Word by Kai Meyer
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The Glass Word

by Kai Meyer

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Dark Reflections (3)

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Showing 4 of 4
What I Liked. All of the individual story lines make sense now. And I do mean all of them. What this tale ended up being, once you cut through all of the weird world building, was a mystery. A who-done-it and why puzzle full of misdirection and interesting twists. On the whole, I loved the continuing creativity and I enjoyed how it all wrapped up in ways I did not expect. Despite being YA, there was not a sappy, feel good ending either. It was bittersweet, partially tragic but true to the story.

What I Didn't Like. I never did feel comfortable in this world. It was just too all over the place. I understand that an alternate reality is going to develop differently from ours and I accept that. However the mix of technology and ancient history wasn't one I could wrap my head around. Sabers and rifles, ancient gods and biblical references, steam factories and magical flying sunbarks, submarines and oar driven galleys, magic working alchemists and laboratory scientists. I also had a bit of a motivation problem. Not involving the grand scheme of things, because that is all explained in this conclusion. My problem lay in the motivation of the protagonists; the choices they made and the ones they didn't make but let others make for them. Alot of the time is was like they were just along for the ride because they had nothing better to do.

Conclusion. In terms of plot and pacing, this was a great book. In terms of creativity alone it was priceless. Unfortunately, the worldbuilding nagged at me though out. I just could not accept the mix of really ancient with fairly modern. Of course, I am not exactly the target audience. Maybe a teen would be more focused on the story itself to the exclusion of the odd mix of magic and technology and less inclined to feel the need to develop any kind of bond with the characters. And I can't rule out the possibility that some things were lost in the translation.

For more detail please read full review @ Dragons, Heroes and Wizards. ( )
  Mulluane | Dec 17, 2013 |
This grand finale of the Dark Reflections Trilogy is put together like a Pot Luck Supper. Many creative ideas, wonderful in their individual elements, but when blended together they become muck.

The first installment was of a fantasy world of Venice, the second book was some version of the Devil in Hell, and this last book of a frozen snow covered Egypt. There are too many fantasy worlds, and many creatures and players that simply do not mix well together. The story does not flow easily, and is so fragmented it would have been better if the author had written three completely separate novels of each different world. The entire large cast of characters are all terribly flat, lifeless and not very likeable. I found myself not caring whether they lived or died, I didnt care what was happening, nor found their plights interesting or suspenseful. The 3 books in this series lack depth in the characters, and the right kind of glue to hold the stories together as one. The character of the Flowing Queen, to me, was pointless. The story could very well have been done better without her part, and the whole involvement of Winter and Summer was just plain dumb. That aspect of the story added nothing to the main body of the tale. A lot of this story is confusing and often feels like nonsense. A good editor and better translator might have improved this series quite a bit, it needed some element of proper blending to make the reading a much smoother ride. I struggled to finish this but I do feel the author is truly gifted. I have read his later trilogy which to me was much more polished, a better adventure, and would eagerly read his works in the future just on the soul point that his fantasy worlds are quite unique. I cant give this one book, or the whole trilogy much praise because although the ideas were original, they were very poorly executed.

I see why even now after a few years have passed since the publication date, there are only just a few reviews. That alone is telling that this series didn't fly. I'm very glad that the aut ( )
  vernefan | Dec 8, 2009 |
Reviewed by Carrie Spellman for TeensReadToo.com

NOTE: This is the third book in a trilogy, just in case you were unaware, and if you can make sense of this story without having read the first two... You're either amazing or scary.

Merle, Vermithrax, Junipa, and, of course, the Flowing Queen, have just barely escaped Hell and Lord Light with their lives. Although none of them is, or will ever be, quite the same. Thanks to the stone light, Vermithrax has turned from regular stone to a nearly impenetrable obsidian, and Junipa's heart is no longer human. Merle is not sure who she can trust, and that includes herself. The Flowing Queen, while not absent, is considerably more silent now. But these personal issues are only the beginning of their problems.

Winter has made his escape as well. He is on a manic hunt for Summer, his only true love. And a blizzard of snow and ice both follows and precedes him. The deserts of Egypt are covered, and all their inhabitants, including our heroes, are in danger of freezing to death. Well, maybe not Vermithrax. Unless they can locate the Iron Eye, the fortress of the sphinxes.

At the Iron Eye their current "mission" will finally be complete. For better or worse. No one is clear on what specifically needs to be done. (Except maybe the Flowing Queen, but she doesn't seem to want to share.) What is clear is that it will take every one of them, and each of their unique abilities, and even some unexpected help, for them to save the world they know. Survival is a completely different concern.

From the very beginning this book overflows with information, and there is no pause. You, as the reader, are almost as exhausted as the characters! There is no time for back history, so you might want to brush up on it before you start this book.

The characters you have come to love, or hate, are all back. Even some that you thought were gone for good. More then a few of them have surprises for you. You just may find yourself changing your opinion of some of them.

This book is literally so fast and furious that my mind is still reeling from it!

I promised you a view of the trilogy as a whole, and I give it five stars. It's absorbing and intricate and frenetic. But, I'm changing my pop culture reference. I see it more like Lord of the Rings. You could experience it in pieces, and it's pretty good. But the impact as a whole is so much greater. Take a day, or a weekend, if you can, and read them all at once. You won't be disappointed. ( )
  GeniusJen | Oct 11, 2009 |
This is clearly the best of the three as often happens with the third in a trilogy. Many of the details about the characters were being held until this novel as trump cards to add to the drama that plays out through the story. As a result, the characters convey better depth and their motives become more complex, creating a stronger sense of empathy with the audience. Even the writing itself has become stronger with greater aesthetic details, poetic language, and variance in sentence complexity. As for the overall story, this is surprisingly the least dark of the three, and the ‘mysterious’ aspects of the text begin to unwind, offering a greater understanding to the reader about the world and its history. Ultimately, though, I still believe that a hundred pages more per novel focused on the psychology of the characters and the aesthetics of the literature would have made each text significantly stronger throughout. Stories like these, with an interesting concept and mythology, are too often rushed, when they could be considered as long-term treasures for literature if there were more layers of conflict and depth laced throughout the story and characters.-Lindsey Miller, www.lindseyslibrary.com ( )
  LindseysLibrary | May 14, 2009 |
Showing 4 of 4
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Kai Meyerprimary authorall editionscalculated
Crawford, Elizabeth D.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0689877927, Paperback)

When they emerge from Hell, Merle, her friend Junipa who has mirrors for eyes, and Vermithrax the flying stone lion find themselves in Egypt. Of course the Flowing Queen is with them as well, since Merle swallowed her back in Venice. There is something very wrong in Egypt--it is freezing cold, and everything is covered in snow. Winter is here, looking for his lost love, Summer. And another creature is here as well--Seth, the highest of the Horus priests. Betrayed by the pharaoh and his sphinx henchmen, Seth is seeking revenge. Together they travel to the Iron Eye, the vast fortress of the sphinxes.But what does the Flowing Queen want Merle to do there?

Meanwhile Serafin, the master thief, the beautiful sphinx Lalapeya, and Eft, the mermaid, are also headed for Egypt. They are traveling underwater, in a submarine piloted by pirates. Serafin is not sure what they can do to the fight the pharaoh, but he knows surrender is not an option. Egypt has captured and enslaved his beloved Venice, and he and the others must fight the empire no matter what the cost. But the final battle will not be one that Serafin has even imagined--and the cost will be high indeed.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:15:03 -0400)

While Merle, Junipa, and the great flying stone lion accompany an Egyptian high priest to the fortress of the powerful sphinx, Serafin and Eft voyage deep beneath the ocean to ask the help of a sea witch in freeing Venice from the Pharoah and his mummy warriors. When they emerge from Hell, Merle, her friend Junipa who has mirrors for eyes, and Vermithrax the flying stone lion find themselves in Egypt. Of course the Flowing Queen is with them as well, since Merle swallowed her back in Venice. There is something very wrong in Egypt--it is freezing cold, and everything is covered in snow. Winter is here, looking for his lost love, Summer. And another creature is here as well--Seth, the highest of the Horus priests. Betrayed by the pharaoh and his sphinx henchmen, Seth is seeking revenge. Together they travel to the Iron Eye, the vast fortress of the sphinxes. But what does the Flowing Queen want Merle to do there?… (more)

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