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Acoustic Phonetics by Kenneth N. Stevens
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Acoustic Phonetics (1998)

by Kenneth N. Stevens

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The application of quantitative modeling methods to the acoustics of speech sound production underwent a major advance with the work of Gunnar Fant. His book, Acoustic Theory of Speech Production, together with his continuing work and that of his students and colleagues in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s, has been a major stimulus to raising the field of acoustic phonetics toward the level of a quantitative science. This book attemps to build on this earlier work of Fant and others over these decades. [From the "Preface"]
For the purpose of discussing sound generation, it is convenient to divide the speech production system into three parts: (1) the system below the larynx, (2) the larynx and its surrounding structures, and (3) the structures and the airways above the larynx. These components of the speech production system are illustrated schematically in figure 1.1. During speech production, a constriction is usually formed in the airways at the level of the vocal folds, located within the larynx. This constricted region, which is just a few millimeters long, is called the glottis, and it forms the dividing line between the subglottal system and the supraglottal system. For the production of most speech sounds, the subglottal system provides the energy in the air-flow, and the laryngeal and supraglottal structures are responsible for the modulation of the airflow to produce audible sound. As we shall see, the energy for some sounds is obtained by trapping air within an enclosed space above the larynx, and expanding or contracting the volume of this space. [From chapter 1, "Anatomy and Physiology of Speech Production"]
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0262692503, Paperback)

This long-awaited work presents a theory of speech-sound generation in the human vocal system. The comprehensive acoustic theory serves as one basis for defining categories of speech sounds used to form distinctions between words in languages. The author begins with a review of the anatomy and physiology of speech production, then covers source mechanisms, the vocal tract as an acoustic filter, relevant aspects of auditory psychophysics and physiology, and phonological representations. In the remaining chapters he presents a detailed examination of vowels, consonants, and the influence of context on speech sound production. Although he focuses mainly on the sounds of English, he touches briefly on sounds in other languages.The book will serve as a reference for speech scientists, speech pathologists, linguists interested in phonetics and phonology, psychologists interested in speech perception and production, and engineers concerned with speech processing applications.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:14:46 -0400)

This work presents a theory of speech-sound generation in the human vocal system. The comprehensive acoustic theory serves as one basis for defining categories of speech sounds used to form distinctions between words in languages. The book will serve as a reference for speech scientists, speech pathologists, linguists interested in phonetics and phonology, psychologists interested in speech perception and production, and engineers concerned with speech processing applications.… (more)

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