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Miracle in the Andes by Nando Parrado
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Miracle in the Andes (2006)

by Nando Parrado

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5252819,248 (4.17)39
Recently added byKOsWL, Samkwrth, KRMcCall, private library, superbeans, timleggett, seite, kesser
  1. 20
    Alive: The Story of the Andes Survivors by Piers Paul Read (goodiegoodie)
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    caimanjosh: This book clearly is somewhat different - there's no sea journeying involved - yet the themes of enduring terrible suffering and overcoming incredible hardships to effect a rescue of one's comrades are the same. Both are the most inspiring stories about the human spirit that I've ever read.… (more)
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English (26)  Spanish (2)  All languages (28)
Showing 1-5 of 26 (next | show all)
9 hours, 45 minutes: The first disc, ( total of 8 cds ) was so boring I could not bear to listen to the rest. The first paragraph was good.... then it went on and on and on and on with background of his family. I lost interest and stopped listening. Maybe someone who listened to the whole book would have another opinion. ( )
  gaillamontagne | Dec 27, 2013 |
1974's Alive by Piers Paul Reid is one of my all-time favorite books. The tone in that one had just the right amount of everything in order to convey the scope and aftermath of that fateful 1972 plane crash in the Andes Mountains. So when I learned that Nando Parrado himself, one of the heroic survivors, was writing a memoir, I was skeptical but still curious. Would his retelling offer a profound new insight to the tragedy? Or would this be another instance of should've left well-enough alone? Fortunately, it's the former.

If you're a fan of the Piers Paul Reid book, or heck, even the 1992 movie, then I recommend this one. ( )
  Daniel.Estes | Dec 26, 2013 |
Even in the minds of the co-authors, this book is overshadowed by another, Piers Paul Read's Alive, which told this story of a plane crash and the months that followed in the Andes using interviews of the survivors. Nando Parrado, one of those survivors called Alive a "magnificent book" and said he had not tried to tell his own story for 30 years because he felt that book already covered "all the public needed to know." Vince Rause in his acknowledgments admitted wondering if another book was necessary since Alive "told that story in such exhaustive detail, and with such definitive scope and power." I read Alive decades ago--it was assigned reading in high school, and it made an indelible impression. There was little in this account that was a surprise to me, because I remembered so many of the details of that other book, and I'd certainly say if you're going to read only one account of this story, it should be that one--it's wonderfully and sensitively written.

But Rouse said he thought another account would be worthwhile if Parrado was really willing to open up and take you back on that mountain and help you think what he thought and felt what he felt and take you along on the spiritual and physical journey he took, and in that I think it succeeds wonderfully. In fact, at certain points I was even moved close to tears, and that isn't easy. Alive emphasized the importance of their shared faith in the ordeal they underwent. There were 45 passengers and crew on that plane, and within a week there were only 27 survivors with all the food running out. To stay alive, those remaining had to resort to eating the bodies of the dead. To allow themselves to do that, some clung to their faith, even trying to see their taking nourishment from their dead as a form of communion.

It was different for Parrado, who would take his survival into his own hands and with one companion make a near impossible climb over the mountain to go get help. Certainly, if there was one survivor of that ordeal whose story I'd want to know, it's his--because he didn't just wait to die. For him in the end the miracle of the Andes wasn't from God. He wrote that he found the "opposite of death is not mere living... courage or faith or human will." It's love. In the end, it was his love for the family that would be grieving for him that pushed him to endure. Parrado's account of the psychology of survival reminded me of nothing so much of accounts I've read of survival in concentration camps--which went well beyond the mere physical. This doesn't to my mind replace Alive, but it's a book well worth having together with it on your shelf. ( )
1 vote LisaMaria_C | Apr 25, 2013 |
This was a great read. Nando Parrado does a fabulous job of evoking the emotions that he was going through as he struggled to survive in the harshest conditions that I can imagine anyone surviving in. In the book, he describes the events from the plane crash on, drawing on the history of the people he is talking about to help the reader gain context for peoples actions.

I'd recommend this book to anyone who enjoys books about survival or about overcoming huge obstacles to accomplish what you need to do. ( )
  ShannaRedwind | Mar 31, 2013 |
Truly nail-biting, suspenseful story, full of emotional and physical trauma, and an inspiring message. Very well written and organized as well. I had a very difficult time putting this one down. If you have seen the movie "Alive" or read the book of the same name, I especially recommend picking this one up to get a new perspective of the mental/emotional state the crash victims were experiencing, From beginning (before the crash) to end (and even after the fame which their survival created.) ( )
  GrapeNoggin | Mar 31, 2013 |
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To Veronique, Veronica, and Cecilia. It was all worth it. I would do it all again for you.
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In the first hours there was nothing, no fear or sadness, no sense of the passage of time, not even the glimmer of a thought or a memory, just a black and perfect silence.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 140009769X, Paperback)

In the first hours there was nothing, no fear or sadness, just a black and perfect silence.

Nando Parrado was unconscious for three days before he woke to discover that the plane carrying his rugby team, as well as their family members and supporters, to an exhibition game in Chile had crashed somewhere deep in the Andes. He soon learned that many were dead or dying—among them his own mother and sister. Those who remained were stranded on a lifeless glacier at nearly 12,000 feet above sea level, with no supplies and no means of summoning help. They struggled to endure freezing temperatures, deadly avalanches, and then the devastating news that the search for them had been called off.

As time passed and Nando’s thoughts turned increasingly to his father, who he knew must be consumed with grief, Nando resolved that he must get home or die trying. He would challenge the Andes, even though he was certain the effort would kill him, telling himself that even if he failed he would die that much closer to his father. It was a desperate decision, but it was also his only chance. So Nando, an ordinary young man with no disposition for leadership or heroism, led an expedition up the treacherous slopes of a snow-capped mountain and across forty-five miles of frozen wilderness in an attempt to find help.

Thirty years after the disaster Nando tells his story with remarkable candor and depth of feeling. Miracle in the Andes—a first person account of the crash and its aftermath—is more than a riveting tale of true-life adventure: it is a revealing look at life at the edge of death and a meditation on the limitless redemptive power of love.


From the Hardcover edition.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:27:17 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

Nando Parrado regained consciousness to discover that the plane carrying his rugby team, as well as family members and supporters, had crashed deep in the Andes. Many were dead or dying, among them his own mother and sister. Those who remained were stranded on a glacier at nearly 12,000 feet, with no supplies and no means of summoning help. They struggled to endure freezing temperatures, deadly avalanches, and then the devastating news that the search for them had been called off. Nando's thoughts turned to his father, who he knew must be consumed with grief, and he resolved that he must get home or die trying--so an ordinary young man, with no disposition for leadership or heroism, led an expedition across 45 miles of frozen wilderness. Thirty years later, Nando provides a revealing look at life at the edge of death and a meditation on the limitless redemptive power of love.--From publisher description.… (more)

» see all 4 descriptions

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