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Don Quixote by Miguel De Cervantes
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Don Quixote (original 1605; edition 2005)

by Miguel De Cervantes, Edith Grossman (Translator)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
19,37525783 (4.07)6 / 616
Member:emily_morine
Title:Don Quixote
Authors:Miguel De Cervantes
Other authors:Edith Grossman (Translator)
Info:Harper Perennial (2005), Paperback, 992 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:toberead, xy, spanish

Work details

Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra (1605)

  1. 40
    The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens (keremix)
  2. 51
    Monsignor Quixote by Graham Greene (hdcclassic)
    hdcclassic: A modern-day retelling.
  3. 62
    Don Quixote de La Mancha, Part II by Alonso Fernandez De Avellaneda (g026r)
    g026r: The spurious continuation, published in 1614 while Cervantes was still working on his own Part II and which affected that work to a significant degree.
  4. 30
    Orlando Furioso, Part One by Ludovico Ariosto (Lirmac)
    Lirmac: References to then-famous romances, such as this one by Ariosto, provide much of the humour in Don Quixote. In addition to enriching Cervantes' work, Orlando Furioso is entertaining in its own right (especially in this modern verse translation).
  5. 63
    The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer (Othemts)
  6. 41
    The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman by Laurence Sterne (ateolf)
  7. 53
    Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert (DLSmithies)
    DLSmithies: Don Quixote was Flaubert's favourite book, and I've read somewhere that the idea of Madame Bovary is to re-tell the story of Don Quixote in a different context. Don Quixote is obsessed with chivalric literature, and immerses himself in it to the extent that he loses his grip on reality. Emma Bovary is bewitched by Romantic literature in the same way. There are lots of parallels between the two novels, and I think putting them side by side can lead to a better understanding of both.… (more)
  8. 10
    Le Morte d'Arthur by Sir Thomas Malory (CGlanovsky)
    CGlanovsky: Read the two concurrently and got a good sense of the kind of chivalric literature that gave birth to Quixote's madness.
  9. 10
    The Adventures of a Simpleton by Hans Jakob Christoffel von Grimmelshausen (chwiggy)
  10. 10
    Exemplary Stories by Miguel de Cervantes (longway)
  11. 10
    The Female Quixote by Charlotte Lennox (Rubbah)
  12. 10
    Selected Non-Fictions by Jorge Luis Borges (CGlanovsky)
    CGlanovsky: In several of his critical essays Borges makes insightful and unique mention of Don Quixote sometimes directly and sometimes in reference to other works.
  13. 11
    Meerfahrt mit Don Quijote by Thomas Mann (chwiggy)
  14. 11
    Handling Sin by Michael Malone (allenmichie)
  15. 11
    Guzmán de Alfarache by Mateo Alemán (roby72)
  16. 45
    One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez (caflores)
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English (205)  Spanish (24)  Dutch (6)  Italian (6)  Catalan (4)  French (3)  Swedish (2)  Portuguese (2)  Norwegian (2)  Korean (1)  All (1)  Hebrew (1)  All (257)
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This review is written with a GPL 4.0 license and the rights contained therein shall supersede all TOS by any and all websites in regards to copying and sharing without proper authorization and permissions. Crossposted at WordPress, Blogspot & Librarything by Bookstooge’s Exalted Permission

Title: Don Quixote
Series: ------
Author: Miguel de Cervantes
Rating: 3.5 of 5 Stars
Genre: Classic
Pages: 1120
Format: Digital Edition

Synopsis:


Don Quixote has a lot of books on knight errantry. He has read them all and in the process gone quite mad, bonkers, round the bound, off the rails, etc, etc. He is crazy.

He is convinced that he is a Knight, that one of his tenants, Sancho Panza is his squire and that the love of his love is Dulcinea Toboso, a village woman who he has never seen, only heard her name. Quixote thus accoutres himself in knightly style and sets out on adventures.

He has many adventures, misadventures, friends and family try to bring him to his senses and in the end he gives up his knightly ways, admits he was crazy and dies in bed.

For more a more indepth look at what actually happens, ie Chapter by Chapter, please check out my various Don Quixote Update Posts.

My Thoughts:

There is so much I want to say about this book. So please forgive any erratic jumping around as I potentially go from random thought to random thought.

I can see why this is a Classic. Cervantes writes amusingly, wittily and tells some good stories. The interactions between Quixote and Sancho ring so true as do their interactions with the various people they meet. And therein lies my first, and biggest issue.

The side stories. This book is divided into Part I and Part II. Part I is chock full of characters that Quixote meets telling their own, long, convoluted and pointless stories. In one or two cases, those side stories end up splitting off into yet a third story. A story within a story within a story. It became frustrating to read. Someone who I can't remember, told me that those side stories represented various forms of writing back in the 1600's and that Cervantes included them to show that indeed, he was a master writer. It makes sense. However, as much sense as it may make, it does not make for an enjoyable read. When I am reading a book entitled Don Quixote I expect to read about the titular character. Thankfully, in Part II there are very few sidestories and the adventures of Quixote and Sancho proceed apace.
My other main issue was the continued madness and stupidity of both Quixote and Sancho. In part it is amusing, funny and chuckle worthy. But when it crashes over me the reader chapter after chapter after chapter, it becomes tragic, not comedic.

In short, while I am not a fan of abridged classics, I WOULD recommend that Don Quixote first be read that way to get the meat of the story. Then the reader can read an unabridged version to wallow in all the unnecessaryness of it all.

I was reading the Oxford World Classics edition that used the Jarvis translation and was edited and annotated by a E.C. Riley. Riley's notes were absolutely useless to me as a casual reader. There were many instances where I would have appreciated some context about the culture that would have explained something but nope, nothing. Then there will be Greek Name Alpha and Riley will spend 3 paragraphs going off about the history of said Greek and how Cervantes saw it ONCE in Village X and that is why Greek Name Alpha was included in the story. It felt like the focus of the notes were supposed to be scholarly but came across as pretentious and pointless. It was a frustrating experience and by Part II I just ignored the annotations.

The thing is, this WAS funny. How can you not laugh when Sancho puts some curds into Quixote's helmet [which is actually a barber's basin] and Quixote claps the helmet on his head and thinks his brains are leaking out because of the curds? Most of the humor is of that sly kind, poking fun at Quixote, at Sancho, at the people they meet.

I would recommend this book just to see how people thought and acted 400 years ago. But get a different edition than this one, one that will explain some of the cultural things that mean nothing to us now.

I started this book in November 2016 and finished it in July 2017. That is 8 months. I could have read it a lot faster but my note taking necessitated taking it slow. I don't in any way feel that my time was wasted or that my updates were negated. It was nice to just slowly punt down the river of this book and enjoy the scenery. Of course by page 700 I was over the scenery and ready to exit the boat.

To wrap up. I enjoyed this even while being frustrated at parts but I don't know that I'll ever read it again. 2000 and now 2017 just about seems enough.

★★★☆ ½ ( )
1 vote BookstoogeLT | Jul 22, 2017 |
Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes
Summary:
Don Quixote is a classic adventure story that transcends more than a decade of Spanish history. It is historical realism, it is romance, it is adventure, it is comedy, and what many do not know is that it also has a section of poetry that adds depth and understanding to this already complex informational source of Spanish culture. This book was written with diction that corresponds how a 1600 Spaniard would talk. The translation done by John Ormsby was done with a very intentional detail of the historical syntax and nomenclature of elements he considered normal to the period. His attention to these details add a significant element to this exceptional piece of ageless literature. The importance to the reader of the themes presented and the many more to be discovered is that dependence on the reader’s experience. A girl today named Elsie would certainly see the value of a good name as much as a dear friend of mine who named her daughter Tequila. Perhaps for her and although these themes are only the introductory themes from the first of two volumes of reading, she may never find a more critical theme although the author may have had greater reason for his expression of this element in the story. The author’s purpose in providing such detail on a name could be more an element of developing character as we get to know the main protagonist but since many elements add up to the meaning in this story it was not lost even though this thematic entry was early on. Dependent on what you, the reader, bring to the reading of the story can be a determinant of whether a passage in this book could be understood by a young mind. For young readers who may not be able to read the old language, may need this book paired with some of the revisions like the one written in 2002 by Miguel de Cervantes. Although many believe young persons are not capable of understanding and responding to the adult themes in Don Quixote, it is my contention that they are very capable in the much more diverse family structures and many additional information sources that surround our children. With many very complex issues introduced to children at a much younger age, the once taboo human experiences and now common discussion. So long as the language is explained and even translated at times with dialogic reading of the original or perhaps through the purchase of the mentioned revisions for more understandable language that could be more readily understood by a younger audience, especially when historical reality is not as important as discovery of theme. The poetry in this book has many deep incites as to how the people and culture of the time should be viewed and understood. It provides the reader a colorful expression of the Spanish culture in 1605.
Personal Reaction:
I was deeply moved by the story. It has so much humor that provides relief form the many serious undertones to his quests as a proclaimed knight in search of justice during a rather turbulent time in Spanish history. When people her Spanish they almost immediately think Latin America. It was refreshing to discover an amazing tribute to Spain, the original of Spanish in language and existence. The complexity of language which included a colorful syntax and commentator notes in prose made this more than a novel; it was a living experience, an adventure into the past.
Classroom Extension Ideas:
1. As the presenter of this book to an advanced children’s literary group, you could prepare an understanding of the author’s intent with the passages that led to your discovery of the Author’s intent. The teacher should also be able to make mention of how the story was written and syntax or how it was worded besides how it was meant to be understood.
2. The poetry has exquisite language and would make an unexpected complimentary discussion in how the book was complimented with the poetry and what it would have meant if it was left out, discuss whether the poetry was a true benefit or just an interesting inclusion.
3. On a week dedicated to understanding Spain, this would be a magnificent way to introduce a history class to a reference that supports the curriculum text perhaps providing a broader perspective and greater understanding of the time. ( )
  jp942205 | Jul 20, 2017 |
Had to read it for school. Horribly tedious to get through. ( )
  lapiccolina | Jun 23, 2017 |
Can innocence only exist in a past long forgotten? What are the dangers of reading books? What is madness? In his renowned book, Miguel de Cervantes deals with these questions and more as he takes us along on the journey of Don Quixote de La Mancha and his faithful squire, Sancho Panza. ( )
  serogers02 | Jun 10, 2017 |
Oh Don Quixote! How I loved you and hated you and loved you some more! I struggled to become engaged with this book, but at some point I fell in hard and found myself laughing through Don Quixote and Sancho Panza's ridiculous adventures! This is a story of madness, friendship, and everything in between. While some parts are down right hard to believe, they are balanced with times of such genuine human interaction, that the reader cannot help but identify with the main characters. ( )
  jess_reads_books | Apr 17, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 205 (next | show all)
An early masterpiece in the evolution of the Novel in Literature: Very entertaining, if at times somewhat long-winded, with an array of lively characters delving into the psychology, philosophy... the 'humors & humours' of the human existence, and a legendary 'hero' - Don Quixote - who tilts at much more of humanity's foibles than just windmills.
 

» Add other authors (202 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel deprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Adler, Mortimer J.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ayala, FranciscoIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Blake, QuentinIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Blecua, José ManuelContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bloom, HaroldIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Braunfels, LudwigTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bulbena i Tosell, AntoniTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Chapman, RobinIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cohen, J. M.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dam, C.F.A. vanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
de Riquer, MartínIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Doré, GustaveIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Edman, IrwinIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Estrada, ManuelCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Franciosini, LorenzoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Frenk, MargitContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fuentes, CarlosIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Giannini, AlfredoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Givanel i Mas, JoanForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
González Echevarría, RobertoIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
GrandvilleIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Grossman, EdithTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Guidall, GeorgeNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Guillén, ClaudioContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Haamstede, N. vanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hahn Jr., A.Illustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Heine, HeinrichIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hollo, J. A.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hutchins, Robert MaynardEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jarvis, CharlesTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kraaz, GerhartIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lange, SusanneTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Legrand, EdyIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Martini, FritzAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Motteux, Peter AnthonyTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nordenhök, JensTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ormsby, JohnTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ozell, JohnEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pascual, José AntonioContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pol, Barber van deTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Putnam, SamuelTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rico, FranciscoEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rojo, GuillermoContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rutherford, JohnTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schüller tot Peursum, C.L.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Shore, T. TeignmouthContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Slade, CaroleEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Smollett, TobiasTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Spemann, AdolfTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stade, GeorgeConsulting Editorial Directorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Starkie, WalterTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tieck, LudwigTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Valcárcel, CarolinaDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vargas Llosa, MarioIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Werumeus Buning, J.W.F.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Idle reader, you can believe without any oath of mine that I would wish this book, as the child of my brain, to be the most beautiful, the liveliest and the cleverest imaginable.
Prologue: Idle reader: I don't have to swear any oaths to persuade you that I should like this book, since it is the son of my brain, to be the most beautiful and elegant and intelligent book imaginable.
Chapter 1: In a village in La Mancha, the name of which I cannot quite recall, there lived not long ago one of those country gentlemen or hidalgos who keep a lance in a rack, an ancient leather shield, a scrawny hack and a greyhound for coursing.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Don Quixote was originally published in two parts. This is the complete and unabridged version, containing both parts. Please do not combine with abridged or incomplete versions.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0060934344, Paperback)

Edith Grossman's definitive English translation of the Spanish masterpiece. Widely regarded as one of the funniest and most tragic books ever written, Don Quixote chronicles the adventures of the self-created knight-errant Don Quixote of La Mancha and his faithful squire, Sancho Panza, as they travel through sixteenth-century Spain. You haven't experienced Don Quixote in English until you've read this masterful translation.

This P.S. edition features an extra 16 pages of insights into the book, including author interviews, recommended reading, and more.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:14:48 -0400)

(see all 7 descriptions)

El ideal de vida del simptico y honesto don Quijote choca violenta y dolorosamente con una realidad grosera y vulgar que no le comprende. Este libro de texto y su disco compacto son diseados para el desarrollo de las cuatro destrezas: leer, escribir, escuchar y hablar.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 35 descriptions

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An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

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2 editions of this book were published by Tantor Media.

Editions: 1400102170, 1400109019

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