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Exiles at home : Australian women writers…
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Exiles at home : Australian women writers 1925-1945

by Drusilla Modjeska

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A fascinating account of a network of Australian women and their interactions with the cultural and political crises of their time.

Drusilla Modjeska has written an unusual book about women struggling to be writers in a changing and challenging time in Australian history. This is not a book with a series of chapters about different women and the literary contributions of each. Although Modjeska gives us such information, her focus is on the interactions within which a group of woman writers and the social political environment in which they were heard. According to Modjeska, the women were a dominant voice in Australian literature. Yet as women they faced particular problems in both their private and public lives–problems many of us today face as we seek to combine families, responsibilities and careers.

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  mdbrady | May 17, 2015 |
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'Invaluable to all readers seriously interested in the history of Australian literature.' - Weekend Australian At the end of the 1920s Christina Stead had left Australia and was poised to write Seven Poor Men of Sydney. In London Miles Franklin was producing her first Brent of Bin Bin book and would soon return to Australia. Katharine Susannah Prichard was enlarging her view of black and white in outback Australia, and the team writing under the name M. Barnard Eldershaw had published its first novel and won the Bulletin prize. Gathering these writers into a network by her support and criticism was the influential Nettie Palmer. In the mid-1930s these women and other writers such as Eleanor Dark, Jean Devanny, Dymphna Cusack and Betty Roland faced the impact of fascism and another war. The platform and the writing desk had different and often conflicting appeals; and the Depression underlined the already precarious existence of the woman writer. This immensely readable work by one of Australia's most respected writers of today is a fascinating insight into the lives of these significant literary figures, and into the creative process itself.… (more)

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