HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Imperial Life in the Emerald City: Inside…
Loading...

Imperial Life in the Emerald City: Inside Iraq's Green Zone (2006)

by Rajiv Chandrasekaran

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,214326,570 (4.08)55
  1. 10
    The Assassins' Gate: America in Iraq by George Packer (rakerman)
    rakerman: Assassin's Gate gives a different but overlapping perspective on many of the issues covered in Imperial Life in the Emerald City; they are good companion books.
  2. 10
    Naples '44: A World War II Diary of Occupied Italy by Norman Lewis (wandering_star)
    wandering_star: Plus ça change... life as a foreign occupier, however friendly, seems to have faced similar challenges in very different environments.
  3. 00
    Shake Hands with the Devil by Romeo Dallaire (wandering_star)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 55 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 32 (next | show all)
This is a book about the opportunities that we had after the war ended against Saddam in Iraq to rebuild and win the hearts and minds of the people and how we mostly squandered and wasted those opportunities.

The plan of attack was created by the military and their plan was to let the civilians come in and do the rebuilding with a little security help from the military. However, the people that prepared ahead of time in the civilian world were not utilized (for the most part) and the people that were given the mission were often appointed for political reasons rather than based on who the best people for the job. Many people were put in charge of things in Iraq that they had no experience in leading to mission failure and created an impression that the American's didn't know what they were doing.

The militry did a pretty good job rebuilding Europe after WWII. I suspect they would have done a much better job initially in Iraq and then could have turned over the mission to civilans. However, the military didn't want this mission.

The truth is, had this been handled differently with a greater level of success there would have been fewer people engaged in insurgent actions and we could have been done with occupation in Iraq much quicker. ( )
  Chris_El | Mar 19, 2015 |
I was pretty disturbed how many times the following mad-lib appeared when describing folks who made key decisions in Iraq's Green Zone:

Mr./Ms X had no experience in [circle one: international politics, economic development, Middle Eastern affairs], but his/her [insert relative here:] played [circle one: tennis, golf, racquetball] with [insert White House sr staff member here:].



( )
  megansbooklist | Nov 30, 2014 |
Heavy indictment of the American civilian administration in Iraq during the occupation 2003-04. The amount of groupthink, suppression of dissent and intentional conformity pressure present that Chandrasekaran details is almost hard to believe. Republican party connections and a right-thinking attitude were the most important qualifications for employees to have. Of course the situation involved many genuinely hard decisions that did not have one "right" answer, but the administration did not seem to have had the humility to admit this. Chandrasekaran is a bit quick to dismiss the efforts at economic reforms as misguided-these had to involve hard trade-offs one way or the other, but it is clear also they were approached haphazardly: A German working on the privatization of state-owned East-German entities in the German unification says they had 8000 people working on it; the privatization in much more chaotic Iraq was managed by three people. Recommended. ( )
  ohernaes | Jul 1, 2014 |
The Green Zone, Baghdad, 2003: in this walled-off compound of swimming pools and luxurious amenities, Paul Bremer and his Coalition Provisional Authority set out to fashion a new, democratic Iraq. Staffed by idealistic aides chosen primarily for their views on issues such as abortion and capital punishment, the CPA spent the crucial first year of occupation pursuing goals that had little to do with the immediate needs of a postwar nation: flat taxes instead of electricity and deregulated health care instead of emergency medical supplies.

In this acclaimed firsthand account, the former Baghdad bureau chief of The Washington Post gives us an intimate portrait of life inside this Oz-like bubble, which continued unaffected by the growing mayhem outside. This is a quietly devastating tale of imperial folly, and the definitive history of those early days when things went irrevocably wrong in Iraq. ( )
  MarkBeronte | Mar 4, 2014 |
This book completed my search to find any valid reason for the US to be in Iraq after overthrowing Saddam's regime. Chandrasekaran showed me many reasons for the US to be in Iraq. He also showed how ignorance, greed, and corruption, spoiled any chance the US had of gaining approval from the Iraqi people. With quotes from over 100 interviews, firsthand accounts, and sheer determination to observe truth; Chandrasekaran exposes the Green Zone. ( )
  Michael.Bradham | Oct 17, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 32 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Do not try to do too much your own hands. Better the Arabs do it tolerably than that you do it perfectly. It is their war, nad you are to help them, not to win it for them. Actually, also, under the very odd conditions of Arabia, your practical work will not be as good as, perhaps, you think it is. (T. E. Lawrence, August 20, 1917)
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0307278832, Paperback)

The Green Zone, Baghdad, 2003: in this walled-off compound of swimming pools and luxurious amenities, Paul Bremer and his Coalition Provisional Authority set out to fashion a new, democratic Iraq. Staffed by idealistic aides chosen primarily for their views on issues such as abortion and capital punishment, the CPA spent the crucial first year of occupation pursuing goals that had little to do with the immediate needs of a postwar nation: flat taxes instead of electricity and deregulated health care instead of emergency medical supplies.

In this acclaimed firsthand account, the former Baghdad bureau chief of The Washington Post gives us an intimate portrait of life inside this Oz-like bubble, which continued unaffected by the growing mayhem outside. This is a quietly devastating tale of imperial folly, and the definitive history of those early days when things went irrevocably wrong in Iraq.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:45:11 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

In this unprecedented account, the Washington Post's former Baghdad bureau chief, Raviv Chandrasekaran, takes us with him into the Green Zone, headquarters for the American occupation of Iraq. In this bubble, cut off from wartime realities, where the task of reconstructing a devastated nation competed with the distractions of a Little America were a half-dozen bars stocked with cold beer, a disco where women showed up in hot pants, a shopping mall, and a parking lot filled with shiny new SUV's, much of it run by Halliburton. The country is put into the hands of inexperienced twentysomethings chosen for their Republican Party loyalty. Ignoring what Iraqis say they want or need, the team pursues irrelevant neoconservative solutions and pie-in-the-sky policies instead of rebuilding looted buildings and restoring electricity. Their almost comic initiatives anger the locals and fuel the insurgency. Most Iraqis were barred from entering the Emerald City for fear they would blow it up.… (more)

» see all 7 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
39 avail.
105 wanted
4 pay7 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.08)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 7
2.5 1
3 35
3.5 23
4 118
4.5 18
5 77

Audible.com

2 editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

See editions

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 96,229,398 books! | Top bar: Always visible