HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Why Go to Church?: The Drama of the…
Loading...

Why Go to Church?: The Drama of the Eucharist (original 2008; edition 2009)

by Timothy Radcliffe (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1664121,205 (3.79)5
The Eucharist, writes Timothy Radcliffe, is a three part drama, forming us in faith, hope and love. In this book he examines what it means to celebrate the Eucharist. Other people experience it as boring and pointless. Listening to the readings, the homily and the creed all take us through the crises and challenges of faith. From the offertory through to the end of the Eucharistic prayer we are caught up in the hope that was Christ's, faced with Good Friday. From the Our Father until we are sent on our way, especially in receiving communion, we are formed as people who are capable of love.… (more)
Member:ONALibrary
Title:Why Go to Church?: The Drama of the Eucharist
Authors:Timothy Radcliffe (Author)
Info:Continuum (2009), Edition: Reprint, 224 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

Why Go to Church?: The Drama of the Eucharist by Timothy Radcliffe (2008)

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 5 mentions

Showing 4 of 4
This second book by Radcliffe sort of follows on from his previous book on Why Be A Christian, but as he states, it is not necessary to read that one first. Why Go Church closely examines each aspect of the liturgy (be it Roman Catholic or Anglican) and investigates the deeply symbolic and religious meanings behind each part. He beautifully brings the liturgy to life and his reasons for church ultimately are summed up as "we go to be sent from it" - that we may tell others of the joy and love we find therein. ( )
1 vote xuebi | May 30, 2014 |
Written by a spiritual master this is an important Lent title that examines what it means to celebrate the Eucharist, and in turn reminds us of our capability for love, hope and faith.The Eucharist writes Timothy Radcliffe is a three part drama, forming us in faith, hope and love. In this book he examines what it means to celebrate the Eucharist. Whilst other people experience it as boring and pointless, listening to the readings, the homily and the creed all take us through the crises and challenges of faith. From the offertory through to the end of the Eucharistic prayer we are caught up in the hope that was Christ's, faced with Good Friday. From the Our Father until we are sent on our way, especially in receiving communion, we are formed as people who are capable of love.
1 vote Priory | Aug 30, 2013 |
It has taken a long time to read this book: partly because I have been reading other books, but especially because it needs to be read with care. It requires a small amount of reading and a lot of thought. At least this is the way that I have tackled it. I found the book very insightful, althought at times I was left a little unsure, say for example the chapter on intercessory prayer. Overall excellent food for thought and Radcliffe's faith shines out. ( )
  carpenterdj | Jun 3, 2010 |
An interesting comparison between the parts of the Communion service and faith, hope, and charity, and the post Resurrection appearances of Jesus in John's Gospel. That makes it sound rather dry, but Radcliffe has a good sense of humour and lots of anecdotes to share. ( )
  Robertgreaves | Mar 20, 2009 |
Showing 4 of 4
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Timothy Radcliffeprimary authorall editionscalculated
Williams, RowanForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
'The unobserved drama is in the core of our humanity': this striking phrase occurs early on in Timothy Radcliffe's engaging and penetrating book.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

The Eucharist, writes Timothy Radcliffe, is a three part drama, forming us in faith, hope and love. In this book he examines what it means to celebrate the Eucharist. Other people experience it as boring and pointless. Listening to the readings, the homily and the creed all take us through the crises and challenges of faith. From the offertory through to the end of the Eucharistic prayer we are caught up in the hope that was Christ's, faced with Good Friday. From the Our Father until we are sent on our way, especially in receiving communion, we are formed as people who are capable of love.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.79)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 5
3.5
4 7
4.5 1
5 3

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 151,786,979 books! | Top bar: Always visible