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Ten Mile Day: And the Building of the…
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Ten Mile Day: And the Building of the Transcontinental Railroad

by Mary Ann Fraser

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Impressive and enjoyable. I was never much interested in history in general, certainly not of this period/ event. But Frazer brings it to life with bright images and clear text. With support, a child as young as 7 or 8 can understand it, and general readers of any age can learn from it. ( )
  Cheryl_in_CC_NV | Jun 6, 2016 |
On May 10, 1869, the final spike in North America's first transcontinental railroad was driven home at Promontory Summit, Utah. Illustrated with the author's carefully researched, evocative paintings, here is the story of that great American adventure--and the day Charles Crocker staked $10,000 on the crews' ability to lay a world record ten miles of track in a single, Ten Mile Day.
  wichitafriendsschool | Mar 25, 2016 |
In this book, Mary Ann Fraser has captured the excitement and frenzy of an amazing true feat, the laying of ten miles of railroad track in one day. It was April 28, 1869. Fourteen hundred of the Central Pacific's best workers (mainly Chinese, but also Irish and perhaps African Americans and Mormon Americans) and nearly five thousand spectators were on hand near the Great Salt Lake to see if Central Pacific Railroad boss Charles Crocker would win his $10,000 bet against Union Pacific's boss. Crocker thought the ten miles could be hammered down and workers were offered four times the normal wages if they were successful. For some, this might have seemed like a ridiculous idea. When the building of the railroad was first begun, laying only one mile was difficult. However, as Fraser consistently points out, the workers had formed themselves into efficient teams. Besides describing the "Ten Mile Day" Fraser included general information about the building of the transcontinental railroad, in both the main text and in several sidebars. The realistic illustrations (also by Fraser!) were well researched and convincing. Although students may not read the end notes "The Next Day...and Beyond" (the text is very small) Fraser goes into some of the long-lasting consequences of the railroad such as the loss of millions of bison and the destruction of native peoples' way of life. Students who love learning about how things are built or enjoy stories about competitions will probably appreciate this book the most. ( )
  odonnell | Jul 19, 2010 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0805047034, Paperback)

On May 10, 1869, the final spike in North America's first transcontinental railroad was driven home at Promontory Summit, Utah. Illustrated with the author's carefully researched, evocative paintings, here is the story of that great American adventure--and the day Charles Crocker staked $10,000 on the crews' ability to lay a world record ten miles of track in a single, Ten Mile Day.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:16:38 -0400)

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Chronicles the race to build the first railroad to cross the North American continent.

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