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The walnut trees of Altenburg by Andre…
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The walnut trees of Altenburg (1948)

by Andre Malraux

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Book description
The narrator of this novel, captured by the German Army in World War II, reflects on his father's experiences on the Russian Front in World War I, and reflects on the fundamental question of whether men are essentially the same in different epochs and different civilizations. This was the only surviving section of a longer manuscript that Malraux was working on when he was captured by the Gestapo in 1944.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0226502899, Paperback)

"One of the key texts of Malraux's work . . . [its] pages must be counted among the most haunting in all of twentieth century literature."—Victor Brombert

"The description of the gas attack on the Russian front in 1915 will never be forgotten by anyone who has read it. . . . [Malraux] writes with the precision, the certitude and the authority of an obsessed person who knows that he has found the essence of what he has been looking for."—Conor Cruise O'Brien, from the Foreword

Malraux's greatest novel, Man's Fate, gave a grim, lurid picture of human suffering. [The Walnut Trees of Altenburg], written by a life-long observer of violent upheaval and within the shadows of World War II, gives a calm, thoughtful vision of humanistic endeavor that can transcend the absurdity of existence. Mature readers will find this a rewarding visit to one of the most accomplished writers of our time."—Choice

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:23:29 -0400)

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