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The Game: Penetrating the Secret Society of…
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The Game: Penetrating the Secret Society of Pickup Artists (2005)

by Neil Strauss

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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1,451215,161 (3.7)6
Recently added bystevenmillerrn, eeio, GShuk, patrykw, etbm2003, ushatten, LapsusCalami, private library
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English (20)  French (1)  All languages (21)
Showing 1-5 of 20 (next | show all)
I hate this book. I hate myself for reading it. (I tried not to.) I hate Neil Strauss and I hate every idiotgirl who slept with him or gave him her number. It's true that I love to hate and that would be reason enough not to drop kick this book into the nearest dumpster. (Also, I got it from the library so that would be rude and I'd have to pay for it anyway.) But I actually enjoyed it, God help me. The author put an astronomical amount of time and energy into bamboozling people and dammit it worked. He's a pathetic little man but he's actually kind of likable. Grrr!

I'm ashamed of the women who've fallen for all this pick-up artist bullshit and I'm ashamed of the men who wasted actual brain-power on learning how to do it. I don't want to believe that there are hundreds of thousands of men out there who want, more than anything else in life, to be able to nail chicks that are way too hot for them. What a pathetic life's ambition. How sad for society in general.

There has to be a way to end this. Prostitution should definitely be legal. Not just legal, but socially acceptable. Also, beautiful women need to be less stingy with the goods. Throw these social rejects a bone, so to speak. Their unchecked macking is a danger to us all.

Now please excuse me while I try to restore my faith in humanity by watching Remember the Titans, Return to Me*, and The Blindside.







*I know that one's not based on a true story but I like to pretend that it is. ( )
1 vote smetchie | Apr 2, 2013 |
I'm not quite sure what to make of this. Do men really think this way? If they do, I think less of them for it. ( )
  Helenliz | Apr 1, 2013 |
Really fascinating, entertaining and at the same time irritating read. The techniques fascinate me, especially when they are used in other contexts than this, but the "game" itself... what can I say? I watched and really enjoyed the tv-series The Pickup Artist too, although it gave me very mixed feelings. Again, the techniques and the mind manipulation stuff is intriguing and can be used for amazing things. Using them to deceive, cheat and fool people is really shitty and an incredible waste of potential... ( )
  OanadeSidor | Oct 7, 2012 |
Probably the most well written and interesting non-fiction work I have read. If you're looking for a "how-to-manual" or a good story, you won't be disappointed. Not for the closed-minded, or for the innocent; this book could do some serious damage to the psyche of those who aren't ready for the worldview shattering contents. ( )
1 vote jackichan | Sep 23, 2010 |
Neil Strauss is a journalist, and The Game: Penetrating the Secret Society of Pickup Artists is probably his most famous work. It’s autobiographical.

The plot:
The book follows Neil Strauss from his initiation into the Seduction Community to his drop-out as a master Pick-Up Artist two years later, mostly thanks to Mystery (and yes that’s the guy from the MTV show). It’s not only a memoir, but also explains the techniques of these guys.

This book is a complete mind-fuck, to be honest. You sit there and your chin’s right about where your knees are and you’re afraid to shake your head lest you break your jaw but you still can’t stop reading. No matter what you think about the whole Pick-Up Artist-shtick (and I don’t think too much about it), it’s a fascinating read, even if only because it’s so fucking insane.

Read more about it at my blog: http://kalafudra.wordpress.com/2009/03/05/the-game-neil-strauss/ ( )
  kalafudra | May 3, 2010 |
Showing 1-5 of 20 (next | show all)
The Game sends out a very mixed message to wannabe PUAs: You’ll get laid a lot, but you may try to commit suicide..., lose your job, or like Strauss almost alienate the love of your life. Not to mention herpes!
added by Shortride | editBookslut, Jennifer Shahade (Mar 1, 2006)
 

» Add other authors (3 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Neil Straussprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bergdahl, IngelaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Chang, BernardIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0060554738, Imitation Leather)

Are you just another AFC ("average frustrated chump") trying to meet an HB ("hot babe")? How would you like to "full-close" with a Penthouse Pet of the Year? The answers, my friend, are in Neil Strauss's entertaining book The Game. Strauss was a self-described chick repellant--complete with large, bumpy nose, small, beady eyes, glasses, balding head, and, worst of all, painful shyness around women. He felt like "half a man." That is, until a book editor asked him to investigate the community of pickup artists. Strauss's life was transformed. He spent two years bedding some fine chiquitas and studying with some of the North America's most suave gents--including the best of them all, the God of the pickup "community," a man named Mystery.

Mystery is an aspiring Toronto magician who charges $2,250 for a weekend pickup workshop. He is not much to look at: a cross between a vampire and a computer geek. But by using high-powered marketing techniques he's turned seduction into an effortless craft--even inventing his own vocabulary. His technique sounds like a car salesman's tip sheet: his main rule is FMAC--find, meet, attract, close. He employs the "three-second rule"--always approach a woman within three seconds of first seeing her in order to avoid getting shy. Other tricks: Intrigue a beautiful woman by pretending to be unaffected by her charm; also, never hit on a woman right away. Start with a disarming, innocent remark, like "Do you think magic spells work?" or "Oh my god, did you see those two girls fighting outside?" And finally, the most important characteristic of the pickup artist--smile.

After two years, Strauss ends up becoming almost as successful as Mystery, but he comes to an important realization. His techniques were actually off-putting to the woman he ended up falling in love with. And they never prepared him for actually having a relationship. After a while, he ran out of one-liners and had to have a real conversation. Still, The Game is a great read that may help some AFCs come out of their shells. --Alex Roslin

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:25:58 -0400)

In 'The Game', Strauss delves into the bizarre underworld of men who have devoted their lives to different techniques of seducing women. These are men with their own verncular & codes of honour, who operate on-line & in person, who are so committed to honing their strategies that they give each other seminars & live together in shared houses.… (more)

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