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The Mill on the Floss (1860)

by George Eliot

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
7,130102890 (3.79)430
The best-known and most autobiographical of George Eliot's novels is now available as a Norton Critical Edition.
  1. 130
    Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë (ncgraham)
    ncgraham: Two Victorian heroines approach the question of how to reconcile passion and morality in very different ways.
  2. 90
    Middlemarch by George Eliot (Booksloth)
  3. 41
    Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy (Booksloth)
  4. 64
    Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë (roby72)
  5. 00
    David Copperfield by Charles Dickens (kara.shamy)
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» See also 430 mentions

English (100)  Spanish (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (102)
Showing 1-5 of 100 (next | show all)
After listening to this book, I can say that I didn't like it as much as Silas Marner. Maggie didn't come as close to me as Silas did. I ususally an able to place myself in the timeframe the book was written in (that is, turn off my 20th/21st century me while reading about girls and women living long ago, but in this particular case I had trouble with it. Maybe because the book was quite long (it could have done with at least 100 pages less, spread here and there over the narrative), but all in all it was okay.
Only the ending was VERY disappointing. Not that I look for a happy ending in every book I read, but this one felt quite desperate. ( )
  BoekenTrol71 | Jun 9, 2020 |
A finely detailed and carefully observed coming-of-age of a girl growing up in rural England in the 1830s. I found Maggie, the protagonist, a compelling and relatable character--in the early part of the book, when she was still a little kid, she often reminded me of other big-hearted and emotionally intense but sometimes-wayward (in the sense of not easily submitting to society's narrow expectations for her) literary heroines that I looked to for reassurance when I was going through my own growing up as that sort of girl. However, the sections of the book that were more focused on other members of her family did not hold my interest as well, and I would have been ok with a lot of them being trimmed and keeping the focus on Maggie. The startling ending was definitely one that will stay with me. ( )
  selfcallednowhere | May 21, 2020 |
Warning: this review contains spoilers

This is an intense novel, emotionally. Maggie Tulliver is a passionate person. She is bright and fierce and a bit otherworldly, not caring what the general populace may think of her, but at the same time desperately seeking the approval of her brother and parents. Overall, this was an interesting read, although there were a few narrative-observation sections that I skimmed over. I was certainly heavily invested in the story, namely by yelling out loud at the book about that ***hole Stephen Guest, who deserved none of her pity. All he could think about was HIS needs and feelings, even though Maggie suffered far more than he did. I wished he’d fallen into a cesspit. Maggie’s brother, Tom, did not deserve her affection either; he was far too hard-hearted and unyielding, believing others instead of her first. So on that level this is a frustrating book, but it is told well and I am looking forward to reading more Eliot. ( )
  rabbitprincess | Apr 18, 2020 |
Too bad Maggie didn't live in modern times where she could have got an education and had a real life instead of clinging to the hope that her brother Tom would love her unconditionally. ( )
  LindaLeeJacobs | Feb 15, 2020 |
This story, written in 1860, by George Eliot is a story of two siblings, Tom and Maggie, who live with their mother and father at the mill on the River Floss.

I was impressed with the the imagery that Eliot was able to create with words. I could see the mill and river when she described them. I also was impressed with the character development. I so wanted to love Maggie and hate Tom but just when I thought I was right, the author could turn it around by giving you positives for Tom and negatives for Maggie. These characters were both ones you could feel sympathy for, though much easier to with Maggie than Tom.

The author also gave us a picture of family dynamics and faults, community positives and negatives, and the difficulties of being a female in this time in history.

The plot is full of symbolism with the mill, the Floss, St. Oggs, Maggie's eyes. The themes; loss of innocence, communal verses individual interest, gender disparity, difficulty of choice, renunciation and sacrifice.

Example of how the author could paint a picture; “These familiar flowers, these well-remembered bird-notes, this sky, with its fitful brightness, these furrowed and grassy fields, each with a sort of personality given to it by the capricious hedgerows - such things as these are the mother tongue of our imagination, the language that is laden with all the subtle inextricable associations the fleeting hours of our childhood left behind them. Our delight in the sunshine on the deep-bladed grass to-day, might be no more than the faint perception of wearied souls, if it were not for the sunshine and the grass in the far-off years which still live in us, and transform our perception into love.”

A quote that looks at the loss of innocence from childhood; “The two slight youthful figures soon grew indistinct on the distant road - were soon lost behind the projecting hedgerow.They had gone forth together into their new life of sorrow, and they would never more see the sunshine undimmed by remembered cares. They had entered the thorny wilderness, and the golden gates of their childhood had for ever closed behind them.” ( )
  Kristelh | Dec 27, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 100 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (73 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Eliot, Georgeprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Allen, Walter ErnestIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Atkins, EileenReadersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Byatt, A. S.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Byatt, A. S.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Constable, JohnCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Daiches, DavidIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Davis, J BernardIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Livesey, MargotIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
MacNeill, AlysonIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Manning, WrayIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mooney, BelIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stephens, IanIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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A wide plain, where the broadening Floss hurries on between its green banks to the sea, and the loving tide, rushing to meet it, checks its passage with an impetuous embrace. On this mighty tide the black ships -laden with the fresh-scented fir-planks, with rounded sacks of oil-bearing seed, or with the dark glitter of coal—are borne along to the town of St. Ogg's, which shows its aged, fluted red roofs and the broad gables of its wharves between the low wooded hill and the river-brink, tingeing the water with a soft purple hue under the transient glance of this February sun. Far away on each hand stretch the rich pastures, and the patches of dark earth made ready for the seed of broad-leaved green crops, or touched already with the tint of the tender-bladed autumn-sown corn. There is a remnant still of last year's golden clusters of beehive-ricks rising at intervals beyond the hedgerows; and everywhere the hedgerows are studded with trees; the distant ships seem to be lifting their masts and stretching their red-brown sails close among the branches of the spreading ash. Just by the red-roofed town the tributary Ripple flows with a lively current into the Floss. How lovely the little river is, with its dark changing wavelets! It seems to me like a living companion while I wander along the bank, and listen to its low, placid voice, as to the voice of one who is deaf and loving. I remember those large dipping willows. I remember the stone bridge.
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Such things as these are the mother-tongue of our imagination, the language that is laden with all the subtle, inextricable associations the fleeting hours of our childhood left behind them. Our delight in the sunshine on the deep-bladed grass to-day might be no more than the faint perception of wearied souls, if it were not for the sunshine and the grass in the far-off years which still live in us, and transform our perception into love.
There is no feeling, except the extremes of fear and grief, that does not find relief in music.
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This work is the book. Please do not combine with any of the movies in any format.
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Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0141439629, 0141198915

Tantor Media

An edition of this book was published by Tantor Media.

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Urban Romantics

An edition of this book was published by Urban Romantics.

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