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And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie
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And Then There Were None (edition 2011)

by Agatha Christie

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Member:ahsreads
Title:And Then There Were None
Authors:Agatha Christie
Info:Harper (2011), Edition: Reprint, Mass Market Paperback, 320 pages
Collections:Wishlist
Rating:***1/2
Tags:mystery, murders, crimes, punished, island, nursery rhyme, kill, death, deaths, suspense, poison, mansion, irony, plot, noose, stranded, action-packed

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And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie

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English (207)  Italian (6)  French (3)  Swedish (3)  Spanish (3)  Dutch (2)  Finnish (2)  German (1)  Portuguese (Brazil) (1)  Portuguese (Portugal) (1)  Danish (1)  All languages (230)
Showing 1-5 of 207 (next | show all)
'There was something magical about an island – the mere word suggested fantasy. You lost touch with the world-an island was a world of its own. A world, perhaps, from which you might never return.’

Ten people arrive at Soldier Island after receiving invitations from various acquaintances convincing them to make the trip. The island has been much talked about recently after some confusion over who owns it so everyone is intrigued to find out the answer to that question. Everyone seemingly has nothing in common with one another until an announcement booms through the house on the first night from a gramophone bringing each persons secret to light. By the end of that first night, one person has died. After a search has been conducted of the island, the rest of the guests come to the realization that they’re the only ones on that island and that the murderer must be among the nine remaining guests.

Agatha Christie is the prolific author known as the “Queen of Crime” and the “Master of Misdirection”. I have no idea what took me so long to pick up anything of hers, being such a long time fan of mysteries in general, but And Then There Were None was the perfect first choice.

Ten little Soldier boys went out to dine;
One choked his little self and then there were nine.

Nine little Soldier boys sat up very late;
One overslept himself and then there were eight.

Eight little Soldier boys traveling in Devon;
One said he’d stay there and then there were seven.

Seven little Soldier boys chopping up sticks;
One chopped himself in halves and then there were six.

Six little Soldier boys playing with a hive;
A bumblebee stung one and then there were five.

Five little Soldier boys going in for law;
One got in Chancery and then there were four.

Four little Soldier boys going out to sea;
A red herring swallowed one and then there were three.

Three little Soldier boys walking in the zoo;
A big bear hugged one and then there were two.

Two Little Soldier boys sitting in the sun;
One got frizzled up and then there was one.

One little Soldier boy left all alone;
He went out and hanged himself and then there were none.

The guests find the above nursery rhyme that has been framed on the wall curious. As well as the ten little soldier figurines that stand on the dining room table. Each subsequent death results in the realization that the deaths are not only following the nursery rhyme (the first individual died after choking on what appeared to be cyanide) but with each death a soldier figurine is mysteriously removed from the table. While it seems unlikely that the murderer would have been able to plan accordingly in order to remain a mystery and still kill, following the nursery rhyme perfectly, the impossibility was expertly erased by the authors exhilarating storytelling ability. Each person begins to suspect one another until there isn’t anyone left to trust, even the reader is continually left in the dark as to the perpetrator. Just when you think you’ve caught on to what’s going on, Christie is bound to throw a wrench into your theories. I loved this book and loved the constant guessing game and will no doubt be picking up many more Agatha Christie novels in the future. ( )
  bonniemarjorie | Feb 20, 2015 |
Wow. Is there anything else that needs to be said? Can I give this ten stars!? ( )
  beearedee | Feb 14, 2015 |
Great classic mystery. ( )
  Joel.Mount | Jan 24, 2015 |
I am not a Christie fan -- but this book transcends type. It robbed me of my sleep. ( )
  Kelley.Logan | Jan 16, 2015 |
The version I read has paragraph by Agatha Christie about the story; she wanted to create a mystery like this and was satisfied that she had done it so well and without cheating.

SPOILER: I liked the fact that there were two points near the end of the book with all the clues needed to figure out whodunit. The first before the epilogue, in which police come to the inaccessible island and discover ten dead bodies and conclude that they cannot solve the case and the second after the epilogue and before the manuscript in which the murderer explains the how and why of everything and even points out the three clues that the reader should have noticed.
Each person on the island is accused of murder, but I have my doubts. One woman fired a young woman because she was "in trouble" and the young woman committed suicide. While the employer's actions were not kind, I don't think they were criminal. Someone suggested that perhaps this example was Agatha Christie's way of showing that she was opposed to the death penalty! An adventurer admitted that he and his friends left their native guides to die but explained that natives don't mind dying the way that civilized people do. There is a Jewish man who helps arrange for the adventurer to be on the island, but there is an Italian-sounding man involved with him: I willing to believe that Ms. Christie is not prejudiced, but merely pointing out the prejudices of others. ( )
  raizel | Jan 5, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 207 (next | show all)
It is the most baffling mystery that Agatha Christie has ever written, and if any other writer has ever surpassed it for sheer puzzlement the name escapes our memory. We are referring, of course, to mysteries that have logical explanations, as this one has. It is a tall story, to be sure, but it could have happened.
 
The mystery is foolproof. The solution is fair. It all fits together at the end.
added by Shortride | editThe New York Times, Charles Poore (pay site) (Feb 23, 1940)
 

» Add other authors (48 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Christie, Agathaprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Autiovuori, PekkaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Barrs, NormanNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Chergé, Gérard deTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Deitmer, SabineTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Della Frattina, BeataTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fraser, HughNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gaïl, UrsulaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Malling, LivTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Postif, LouisTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rivière, FrançoisAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Thermaenius, EinarTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vallandro, LeonelTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Varho, HelkaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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In the corner of a first-class smoking carriage, Mr. Justice Wargrave, lately retired from the bench, puffed at a cigar and ran an interested eye through the political news in the Times.
Quotations
'Don't you see? We're the Zoo .... Last night, we were hardly human any more. We're the Zoo ....'
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
* This is a novel, and as such should NOT be combined with the play of the same title, nor with any of the various film adaptations.

* AKA Ten Little Niggers / Ten Little Indians.

* (fin) Vuoden 2003 painos nimellä: Eikä yksikään pelastunut

Note that LibraryThing's "canonical title" is intended for the most common title, not the original or most "accurate one." Although the novel was originally titled Ten Little Niggers, far more have read it as And Then There Were None. Thus, that is the appropriate canonical title.
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0312330871, Paperback)

Considered the best mystery novel ever written by many readers, And Then There Were None is the story of 10 strangers, each lured to Indian Island by a mysterious host. Once his guests have arrived, the host accuses each person of murder. Unable to leave the island, the guests begin to share their darkest secrets--until they begin to die.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:38:57 -0400)

(see all 7 descriptions)

Considered one of the greatest mysteries of all times, ten strangers, each with a dark secret, are gathered together on an isolated island by a mysterious host. One by one, they die, and before the weekend is out, there will be none.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 19 descriptions

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