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Rooftops of Tehran by Mahbod Seraji
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Rooftops of Tehran (2009)

by Mahbod Seraji

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4023038,528 (3.94)15
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    Snow in August by Pete Hamill (Anonymous user)
    Anonymous user: Both of these books deal with a boy's coming of age during tense times.
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Showing 1-5 of 29 (next | show all)
I really don't know why everyone loves this book so much. There are some great books on the Iranian Revolution - like "Persepolis" - but this is not one of them. The characters are simple, archetypal, and boring, without any depth. The story dragged on and on (this book should have been 200 pages shorter!). If you want to learn about Iran, read something else. ( )
  bookishblond | Oct 24, 2018 |
This was a good book, a bit too drawn out near the end, at least for my taste, but otherwise well written and well paced. It is a love story set in Iran before the current hyper-religious era, but just before the transition from the semi-modern developing state Iran was starting to become and the fundamentalist state it is now. Through the development of a teenage boy's first love, we get to see many of the facets of Iranian life before women were so severely restricted, and while atheists and other non-Islamic citizens could live somewhat unmolested in Iran. After all the news I've read about Iran over the past few years, it was a strange notion that the world in this book was actually Iran.

I was amused at the parts of this book having to do with education and cheating in Iranian culture, too, because having spent a few years grading college papers and trying to explain to young college students from Iran and other culturally similar places why plagiarism is not permitted in Western education, and what plagiarism even means. To have otherwise smart, civilized kids like those constantly trying to cheat and cut corners and wrangle unearned grades was frustrating, but at least in reading stories like this one, it is more understandable how such 'unethical' behavior might seem ok to them, and how much of a culture shock such students experience when they arrive here for college and discover our standards and expectations differ so much from what they are used to.

I definitely recommend this book to just about anyone.
I won my copy of this book through a Goodreads First Reads giveaway. ( )
  JBarringer | Dec 30, 2017 |
Fascinating story set in pre-revolution Iran. It was so interesting to read about life in Tehran and the mixed feelings the Iranians had about America. Throw in an interesting story and I was hooked. ( )
  mamashepp | Mar 29, 2016 |
Fascinating story set in pre-revolution Iran. It was so interesting to read about life in Tehran and the mixed feelings the Iranians had about America. Throw in an interesting story and I was hooked. ( )
  mamashepp | Mar 29, 2016 |
My suggestion is to buy a lot of tissue before starting the second part of the book. Seemed that the characters were crying a river constantly - didn't know that people could cry that much. The premise of the book, in itself, was good, but I think the author took it too far. He could have stopped the story with Pasha's return to the alley and all would have ended well. From that point on, it just seemed to drag on with no purpose. ( )
  tmscott13 | Jan 23, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 29 (next | show all)
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I hear someone's voice chanting, and the repetitive verses lap like water at the edge of my consciousness.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 045122681X, Paperback)

From "a striking new talent"(Sandra Dallas, author of Tallgrass) comes an unforgettable debut novel of young love and coming of age in an Iran headed toward revolution.

In this poignant, eye-opening and emotionally vivid novel, Mahbod Seraji lays bare the beauty and brutality of the centuries-old Persian culture, while reaffirming the human experiences we all share.

In a middle-class neighborhood of Iran's sprawling capital city, 17-year-old Pasha Shahed spends the summer of 1973 on his rooftop with his best friend Ahmed, joking around one minute and asking burning questions about life the next. He also hides a secret love for his beautiful neighbor Zari, who has been betrothed since birth to another man. But the bliss of Pasha and Zari's stolen time together is shattered when Pasha unwittingly acts as a beacon for the Shah's secret police. The violent consequences awaken him to the reality of living under a powerful despot, and lead Zari to make a shocking choice...

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(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:13:42 -0400)

An unforgettable debut novel of young love and growing up in an Iran headed toward revolution. In a middle-class neighborhood of Iran's sprawling capital city, 17-year-old Pasha Shahed spends one perfect, stolen summer with his beautiful neighbor, Zari, until he unwittingly guides the Shah's secret police to their target: Zari's intended. The violent consequences awaken Pasha and his friends to the reality of life under the rule of a powerful despot, and lead Zari to make a shocking choice from which Pasha may never recover.… (more)

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