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Rules of Vengeance by Christopher Reich
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Rules of Vengeance

by Christopher Reich

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Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
This was a gorgeous reading. I liked this espionage story very much. All major countries as US, Russia and England are involved, but nobody would grant someone else the success. Jonathan's wife is an agent but it let me guessing until the last page for whom she is working. Firstly, Jonathan couldn't believe what his 'wife' is up to, therefore he isn't trying to help her than to stop her. It was a breathtaking reading until the very last page. ( )
  Ameise1 | Dec 26, 2013 |
This is a good fast-action read. All the action takes place in a couple of days with travel over half of europe and a wide cast of characters. Very complex relationships between characters.Unfortunately I did not read the prior book "Rules of Deception." A lot pieces of history from "Deception" are missing which diminishes the story line. Similarly there are too many loose ends at the end - obviously there will be a sequel.I'v read several of his other books and I don't think this one is up to par but that is probably I didn't read the first of the series.I recommend you read "Deception" first. ( )
  EctopicBrain | Jul 31, 2012 |
Along came Rules of Deception. Was it really a return to the big blockbuster of the 70’s and 80’s? Critics certainly were embracing it with gusto. So it was with some excitement and no small amount of skepticism that I picked up the book. The story started like a rocket and picked up speed from there. By page 20, I knew the critics had gotten it right. Rules of Deception was the very definition of a blockbuster: a lone, intrepid hero battling immense odds to save the world from a cataclysmic battle while also regaining the love of a fallen woman.

Now, Reich gives us Rules of Vengeance. Sequels are rarely as good as the original, so again, I was skeptical. And yet, Rules of Vengeance turns out to be that rare exception—where the novel not only stands up to its predecessor, but actually takes the story and characters in new—and completely surprising—directions. Again we meet Dr. Jonathan Ransom, a surgeon for Doctors Without Borders. The story begins with his arrival in London to deliver an address at a prestigious international medical conference, and it takes off from there at mach speed, offering more twists than the Monaco Grand Prix. I’m not going to give away any of the unexpected plot turns (and there are many), but I will say that once again, Ransom quickly finds himself in trouble not of his own making. And, once again, he is forced to maneuver between the good guys and the bad guys in order to figure out just what he’s been pulled into, and then make sure that no one else suffers because of it. The stakes are sky high. The locales are exotic. The plot is ripped from tomorrow’s headlines and Reich controls the story with a deft hand from beginning to end.

What’s particularly appealing about Jonathan Ransom is he is not a spy or a trained assassin. He is, in fact, the opposite: a doctor who has devoted his life to helping others—a loner working outside political boundaries who exemplifies the best in us all. But like each of us, he has a dark side that is both frightening and compelling. You do not want to make this man angry. ( )
  dspoon | Oct 30, 2010 |
Unimpressed with lots of loose ends... ( )
  xavierroy | Sep 25, 2010 |
I have never paid attention to Christopher Reich or any of his books. However, I went to CVS to buy some sunscreen that I could take in a carry-on for my recent trip to Florida, and I was looking for an airplane book. Rules of Vengeance seemed to be the most promising of the sad and tiny selection.

It is the second book about Dr. Jonathan Ransom, a physician with Doctors Without Borders who is married to a woman who calls herself Emma. That, of course, is not her real name. Emma is an operative with Division, a secret (fictional) Pentagon department devoted to black ops. Emma has gone rogue after foiling an attempt to blow up a passenger airplane, and is now on the run from Division. Jonathan meets her briefly in London, where he has been invited to speak at a medical conference.

Most of the action in this thriller takes place in London. Lord Robert Russell is murdered, and the hunt for his killer begins. The investigation is headed by Detective Chief Inspector Kate Ford, of the London Metropolitan Police. The next day, a car bomb is detonated. Emma and Jonathan are now being hunted by Division, MI5, and FSB, the Russian secret intelligence agency.

This book is fast-moving, intelligent and interesting. I would definitely recommend it for anyone who enjoys a good thriller. ( )
  LaBibliophille | Jun 7, 2010 |
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0385524072, Hardcover)

Vince Flynn Reviews Rules of Vengeance

Vince Flynn is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of nine previous thrillers, including Consent to Kill, Act of Treason, and Protect and Defend. He lives in the Twin Cities with his wife and three children. Read his guest review of Christopher Reich's Rules of Vengeance:

Last summer, before I picked up Christopher Reich’s Rules of Deception, I’d heard it was the kind of smart, high-octane international thriller that would take me back to tales of espionage and political intrigue written by the masters—like Frederick Forsyth, Ken Follett, and Robert Ludlum. Those books were propulsive mixes of fact and fiction, set in a combustible, all-too-real world where peace balanced on a razor’s edge and nuclear annihilation was a single bullet away. The best of them, like Forsyth’s The Fourth Protocol and Ludlum’s The Bourne Identity, left you wondering if they might, in fact, be true. Might something like this really happen?

Then came the 1990’s. The Iron Curtain fell. Russia imploded. And Japan suffered a severe economic crisis. The world was left with America as its sole superpower. The bomb had been defused. We felt safe. And so ended the domination of international espionage blockbusters on the bestseller lists.

Along came Rules of Deception. Was it really a return to the big blockbuster of the 70’s and 80’s? Critics certainly were embracing it with gusto. So it was with some excitement and no small amount of skepticism that I picked up the book. The story started like a rocket and picked up speed from there. By page 20, I knew the critics had gotten it right. Rules of Deception was the very definition of a blockbuster: a lone, intrepid hero battling immense odds to save the world from a cataclysmic battle while also regaining the love of a fallen woman.

Now, Reich gives us Rules of Vengeance. Sequels are rarely as good as the original, so again, I was skeptical. And yet, Rules of Vengeance turns out to be that rare exception—where the novel not only stands up to its predecessor, but actually takes the story and characters in new—and completely surprising—directions. Again we meet Dr. Jonathan Ransom, a surgeon for Doctors Without Borders. The story begins with his arrival in London to deliver an address at a prestigious international medical conference, and it takes off from there at mach speed, offering more twists than the Monaco Grand Prix. I’m not going to give away any of the unexpected plot turns (and there are many), but I will say that once again, Ransom quickly finds himself in trouble not of his own making. And, once again, he is forced to maneuver between the good guys and the bad guys in order to figure out just what he’s been pulled into, and then make sure that no one else suffers because of it. The stakes are sky high. The locales are exotic. The plot is ripped from tomorrow’s headlines and Reich controls the story with a deft hand from beginning to end.

What’s particularly appealing about Jonathan Ransom is he is not a spy or a trained assassin. He is, in fact, the opposite: a doctor who has devoted his life to helping others—a loner working outside political boundaries who exemplifies the best in us all. But like each of us, he has a dark side that is both frightening and compelling. You do not want to make this man angry.

As for Christopher Reich, he—like Ransom—also may not be a trained spy or assassin (at least not to the best of my knowledge). But he certainly does manipulate the twists, summon the adrenaline, and create a landscape of thrills that can only leave readers with one lasting impression: Chris Reich is the real deal. —Vince Flynn

(Photo © Peter Hurley)

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:29:53 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

Rendered a fugitive when he is wrongfully implicated in a terrorist attack that interrupted his secret rendezvous with his dishonored spy wife, physician Jonathan Ransom struggles to clear his name, only to discover that he may be a pawn in an international plot.… (more)

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