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My Lucky Day by Keiko Kasza
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My Lucky Day (2003)

by Keiko Kasza

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English (26)  French (1)  All (27)
Showing 1-5 of 26 (next | show all)
My Lucky Day is a great book for teaching inferring as well as synthesizing. Immediately, you think from the cover that it’s definitely the fox’s lucky day, but that little pig is sly. Even from the cover, you may notice that he doesn’t look at all scared. What a FUN book to read over and over and over again!
  brittneye | Aug 19, 2017 |
I'm sticking to my guns here. We can talk about how animals eat other animals, or we can have anthropomorphic animal tales, but both together just seems perverse. ( )
  MeditationesMartini | Jun 26, 2017 |
Summary: A pig "accidentally" knocks on a hungry fox's door. The fox immediately thinks it's his lucky day because dinner is served. The pig begins to talk her way out of being eaten, by saying she is too tough and needs a massage first, she's too dirty and needs a bath first, she's too lean and needs food first. After the fox does all of these things for the pig, he is exhausted and falls asleep! The clean, full, and relaxed pig escapes the fox's house and plans his next door to knock on. It ends with the pig marking off fox on his list of houses to visit.

Personal reaction: I love this book! When I first began reading it, I thought it was going to end much differently. I immediately thought the fox made a mistake and knocked on the wrong door. I like how this book was not predictable at all, but instead kept you on your toes waiting for what's coming next!

Classroom extension ideas: You could read this book and then begin a writing activity. Tell the students to write an alternate ending to this book. After each student has written their alternate ending, have a share time. If time permits, have each student share their ending to the class. If you are on a time crunch, call on a few students to share to the class, or have each student share to a partner.
  Morgan.Nelson | Sep 6, 2016 |
This is a delightfully fun book for younger children that features a pig that "accidentally" knocks on the door of a hungry fox. The fox thinks he's in for a delicious pig roast, but the pig has other plans. He tricks the fox into providing him a lovely, relaxing spa day.

Curricular connections:
This book could be used to teach sequencing, making predictions, and characters. ( )
  danielle.trotter | Feb 27, 2016 |
My Lucky Day was a very cute book. It seemed to be a spin-off of the story The Three Little Pigs, almost like an alternative scenario. I really liked the humor that the author incorporated into the story. I found myself—multiple times—laughing throughout the book. “What a bath! What a dinner! What a massage! This must be my lucky day!” This was funny to me because the entire day was about preparing the piglet to be eaten by the fox and instead of the pig focusing on the fact that he was almost eaten he enjoyed his bath, dinner, and massage and claimed it to be his lucky day! I really liked the illustrations throughout the book. Each illustration clearly tells the story without needing to read the words to tell the story. Kasza also includes small details such as motion lines to show the movement of the characters and adding texture to the foxes fur. This book has a clear, story plot with a building climax and a resolution at the end. I think that this would be categorized as a modern fantasy. The animals have human-like characteristics like talking and cooking etc. I couldn’t really pick out a solid message or lesson within the story other than teaching the reader to think outside the box. The pig thinks of cleaver ways to manipulate the fox into thinking he needed to do things to the pig before eating him, which leads to the pig being able to escape safely. Overall I really thought this book was great and I really enjoyed reading it. ( )
  Morgan.McDaniel | Feb 22, 2016 |
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One day, a hungry fox was preparing to hunt for his dinner. As he polished his claws, he was startled by a knock at the door.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 014240456X, Paperback)

When a delicious-looking piglet knocks on Mr. Fox's door "accidentally," the fox can hardly believe his good luck. It's not every day that dinner just shows up on your doorstep. It must be his lucky day! Or is it?

Before Mr. Fox can say grace, the piglet has manipulated him into giving him a fabulously tasty meal, the full spa treatment (with bath and massage), and . . . freedom.

In a funny trickster tale of her own, Kasza keeps readers guessing until the surprise ending when they'll realize it was piglet's lucky day all along.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:12:32 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

When a young pig knocks on a fox's door, the fox thinks dinner has arrived, but the pig has other plans.

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