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No Cross, No Crown: Black Nuns in…
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No Cross, No Crown: Black Nuns in Nineteenth-Century New Orleans

by Mary Bernard Deggs

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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0253215439, Paperback)

Among New Orleans’ most compelling stories is that of the Sisters of the Holy Family, which was founded in the 19th century and still thrives today. The community’s difficult early years are portrayed in a remarkable account by one of the sisters, Mary Bernard Deggs. While Deggs did not officially join the community until 1873, as a student at the sisters’ early school she would have known Henriette Delille and the other founders. It was not until 1852 that the sisters were able to take their first official vows and exchange their blue percale gowns for black ones, and it was 1873 before they were permitted to wear a formal religious habit. This community of mixed race faced almost insurmountable obstacles, but the women remained unflagging in their dedication to the poor, to education, and to the care of the elderly and the orphaned—to the needs of "their people."

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:04:15 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Nineteenth-century New Orleans was a diverse city. The French-speaking Catholic Creoles, whether black, white, or racially mixed -- so different from the city's English-speaking residents -- inspired intense curiosity and speculation. But none of the city's inhabitants evoked as much wonder as did the Sisters of the Holy Family, whose mission was to evangelize slaves and free people of color and to care for the poor, sick, and elderly.These women, whose community still thrives, are portrayed in an account… (more)

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