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White Rose by R. Garcia y Robertson
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White Rose

by R. Garcia y Robertson

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: War of the Roses ( Book 3)

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Third (and last?) in the series, after Lady Robyn. Robyn returns once again to the 15th century, this time accompanied by her ditzy and oversexed assistant Heidi. After various misadventures, including an interlude with Owen Tudor and being at the scene of a town overrun by enemy forces, Robyn is reunited with Edward in London. But she faces a choice--return to the present's safety and good health-care, or face an uncertain life in the past with a potentially unfaithful Edward.

A lot of movement but not much resolution. Doesn't much read like the end of a series. It also continues to be really annoying that she never bothered to look up who Edward really is and how the history came out. ( )
  readinggeek451 | Jun 13, 2009 |
Third (and last?) in the series, after Lady Robyn. Robyn returns once again to the 15th century, this time accompanied by her ditzy and oversexed assistant Heidi. After various misadventures, including an interlude with Owen Tudor and being at the scene of a town overrun by enemy forces, Robyn is reunited with Edward in London. But she faces a choice--return to the present's safety and good health-care, or face an uncertain life in the past with a potentially unfaithful Edward.

A lot of movement but not much resolution. Doesn't much read like the end of a series. It also continues to be really annoying that she never bothered to look up who Edward really is and how the history came out. ( )
  mab2008 | Dec 31, 2008 |
This book ends so abruptly that I examined the end papers to make sure that I wasn't missing a one-page chapter. The author doesn't even tie up the loose ends in this volume, let alone the series which I had understood to be projected as a trilogy. I was seriously torn between one star and two.

I suppose that reading this book must be different for people who are familiar with the historical period and people who are not. Edward is presented as a bit more innocent and romantic than I imagine him as actually being, but I'm willing to accept it, he is pretty young. His personality actually gets a bit of retroactive revision in this volume. I kept reading the series because of the suspense of wondering whether the author was going to keep to the established history or finish with an alternative history. Well, it wasn't resolved in this book, and I am not certain that I care enough to read any more. The advice that Robyn receives to name her daughter Grace is a tip-off.

The books have been kind of fun, although not particularly good historical novels. I enjoy the juxtaposition of the two eras and Robyn's reactions. Making her a Miss Montana expert equestrian was a brilliant decision that makes her adventures more believable. The Middle Ages are a bit romantized, even if she doesn't find the era a bit smelly, I'd be longing for running water and flush toilets. Particularly incredible is Robyn's use of laptop computer to keep her diary. Even assuming that it didn't upset the locals, what fabulous batteries she must have! I also find it hard to believe that anyone who is as familiar with Shakespeare as Robyn is (she quotes Henry V's speech just before Agincourt from memory) knows so little about this era. She has apparently completely missed the Henry VI and Richard III plays. The witchcraft/religion angle is a bit problematic as well, although I'm willing to accept it for the sake of the story. It is the source of some wonderful scenes, but I'm having a little trouble with Robyn's sincere, simultaneous adoption of witchcraft and medieval Catholicism. I see the parallels, but it still seems a trifle awkward, especially since both are new to Robyn. If she had been a modern Goddess worshipper, or a really, really ecumenical Christian, it would seem a little more likely.

The writing is extremely varied: sometimes Garcia y Robertson manages extremely vivid characterizations and descriptions, and other times it is pretty lame. Each novel seems to get a little more torrid, which I don't find an improvement: there is a very formulaic quality to a lot of it.

Some people argue that romance is a product of western courtly love conventions, but I believe that it is part of the human condition. The problem is that there are different types of romance and I don't think that Garcia y Robertson has cobbled together the right bits, especially from Edward's point of view. Robyn is neither an Arthurian lily maid nor a scornful courtly love idol that she should inspire Edward to immediately determine on marriage to someone who would be so completely unacceptable by contemporary standards. (Actually, strictly speaking, the courtly love idol was married to someone else, but I think that requirement was often ignored.) I presume that the author hopes that people who know Edward's history will know that he did, as king, make a marriage that created a scandal, but even that was to a woman of an aristocratic background and one who refused to sleep with him.

There is of course, basic chemistry (which I believe is universal), and the solution in that era would have been concubinage, such as the relationship that Edward's great(s)-uncle John of Gaunt enjoyed with Katherine Swynford while he was married to his second wife. Edward never even suggests it, and especially considering Robyn's objections to being Queen and her freewheeling 21st centuries attitudes, it seems like a natural solution. It would be a little more plausible if Edward proposed the arrangement and Robyn was too jealous to accept it.

All in all, I think this is wearing a little thin. ( )
  juglicerr | Oct 10, 2007 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
R. Garcia y Robertsonprimary authorall editionscalculated
Bell, JulieCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0312869940, Hardcover)

R. Garcia y Robertson's delightful saga of time travel and romance, which began with Knight Errant and continued through Lady Robyn, grows even more irresistible as Robyn Stafford, a savvy Hollywood exec mystically transplanted to 15th century England, works overtime to secure happiness and true love amidst the fratricidal madness of the War of the Roses.

Once a thoroughly modern Californian (and former Miss Rodeo Montana), Robyn has come to savor her new life as Lady Robyn of Pontefract, betrothed to the dashing young Edward Plantagenet, Earl of March, Duke of York, and heir to the English throne. Temporarily stranded back in 21st century, she wastes no time getting back to 1461, albeit with a few unexpected bumps along the way.

But her troubles hardly end when she makes it back to Merrie Olde England and the arms of her beloved knight errant. War is in the air, with a rebellious Tudor army challenging Edward's forces at home, and a French invasion force gathering in the north, preparing to march on London. Having witnessed firsthand the deadly realities of medieval politics, Robyn is in no hurry to see Edward claim the throne, but, like it or not, he is the heir apparent, and Robyn must use all her wits to keep their love alive -- even if it means inventing tabloid journalism several centuries early!

Look out, London! Lady Robyn has returned, so the Middle Ages had best mind its manners.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:25:29 -0400)

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