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The Glass Cafe: Or the Stripper and the…
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The Glass Cafe: Or the Stripper and the State; How My Mother Started a War…

by Gary Paulsen

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7312164,469 (3.93)1
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Showing 1-5 of 12 (next | show all)
Quick read and very fun! I liked the author's asides to the reader. Quite a tale! ( )
  njcur | May 8, 2017 |
Tony's voice is teen stream-of-consciousness...
  Salsabrarian | Feb 2, 2016 |
This is a YA book due to the content. It is told from the perspective of a 12-year-old boy who loves art class and draws several examples of the human body for class. He does a great job and is even entered in an art show locally! The problem? The problem you ask? His muses are the strippers at the club where his mom dances. What happens is hilarious but so realistic, showing how people overreact to certain situations. A quick but great read. ( )
  Susan.Macura | Dec 12, 2015 |
This book was a lot of fun. The book is told in a style that implies that the main character, Tony, a middle school student. His mother is Al, an exotic dancer at the Glass Cafe. Al is trying really hard to bring Tony up alone to be a smart and interesting guy. Although Al works as an exotic dancer, she actually has degrees but only does this because it makes a lot of money. Tony gets to do some drawings of the other dancers, as figure studies. There is nothing sexual or dirty going on, but when the drawings go one exhibit, someone makes a complaint and the social working handling the problem handles it poorly and much drama ensues. The book is funny and provides a lot to think about regarding looking past the obvious such as peoples jobs and how they look, to see what is really there. ( )
  Rosa.Mill | Nov 21, 2015 |
This book was a lot of fun. The book is told in a style that implies that the main character, Tony, a middle school student. His mother is Al, an exotic dancer at the Glass Cafe. Al is trying really hard to bring Tony up alone to be a smart and interesting guy. Although Al works as an exotic dancer, she actually has degrees but only does this because it makes a lot of money. Tony gets to do some drawings of the other dancers, as figure studies. There is nothing sexual or dirty going on, but when the drawings go one exhibit, someone makes a complaint and the social working handling the problem handles it poorly and much drama ensues. The book is funny and provides a lot to think about regarding looking past the obvious such as peoples jobs and how they look, to see what is really there. ( )
  Rosa.Mill | Nov 21, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 12 (next | show all)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0440238439, Mass Market Paperback)

THE STORY IS all true and happened to me and is mine.

Tony’s mom, Al, is a terrific single mother who works as a dancer at the Kitty Kat Club. Twelve-year-old Tony is a budding artist, inspired by backstage life at the club. When some of his drawings end up in an art show and catch the attention of the social services agency, Al and Tony find themselves in the middle of a legal wrangle and a media circus. Is Al a responsible mother? It’s the case of the stripper vs. the state, and Al isn’t giving Tony up without a fight.

Once again Gary Paulsen proves why he’s one of America’s most-beloved writers. The Glass Café is a fresh and funny exploration of motherhood, art, and the wiles of storytelling—all told by Tony, in his own true voice.


From the Hardcover edition.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:15:19 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

When twelve-year-old Tony, a talented artist, begins sketching the dancers at the Kitty Kat Club where his mother is an exotic dancer, it sparks the attention of social services.

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