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In the Time of the Butterflies by Julia…
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In the Time of the Butterflies (original 1994; edition 2010)

by Julia Alvarez

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2,700652,193 (4.09)114
Member:jclyde
Title:In the Time of the Butterflies
Authors:Julia Alvarez
Info:Algonquin Books (2010), Edition: Reprint, Paperback, 352 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
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In the Time of Butterflies by Julia Alvarez (1994)

  1. 30
    The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz (weener)
    weener: Oscar Wao mentions In the Time of the Butterflies in a footnote. Both dealing so gracefully with the Trujillo regime, they seem like complementary books.
  2. 00
    Something Fierce: Memoirs of a Revolutionary Daughter by Carmen Aguirre (owen1218)
  3. 00
    I, Rigoberta Menchu: An Indian Woman In Guatemala by Rigoberta Menchu (cammykitty)
  4. 00
    Child of the Revolution: Growing up in Castro's Cuba by Luis M. Garcia (somavolta)
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English (60)  Dutch (2)  Spanish (1)  German (1)  All languages (64)
Showing 1-5 of 60 (next | show all)
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  OberlinSWAP | Jul 20, 2015 |
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  OberlinSWAP | Jul 20, 2015 |
During the 1950s, many people disappeared, were executed or had the misfortune to suffer fatal 'accidents' during the reign of Rafael Trujillo, dictator of the Dominican Republic.

This is a fictitious look at the lives of the Mirabal Sisters, Patria, Dedé, Minerva and Maria Teresa. Patria, Minerva and Maria Teresa were assassinated in 1960 for their underground revolutionary activities against Trujillo.
  cameling | May 24, 2015 |
In the time of butterflies is a fictional story about four real persons, the Mirabal sisters. They are harassed and persecuted all while their families suffer retaliation from the military intelligence service in the Dominican Republic. The author is well know for her sayings on most of her books and this book its not an exception. For example, one of the chapters is called “voz del pueblo, voz del cielo”, this means, "Talk of the people, voice of God," and it is an old proverb. Dede says it to Minerva as she tries to convince her that the rumors that Trujillo wants her dead are not silly. She takes it to mean that popular opinion is always right, and in this case, it is. Minerva refuses to listen to her sister, calling the talk "silly rumors," but this is a mistake and she is killed. Mama also uses this proverb to warn Minerva about traveling to visit Puerto Plata. This phrase also is the title of the last section of the last chapter of the novel, told from Minerva's point of view. It is as if this section serves as proof that rumors are usually true, that the people have a certain wisdom, and that one should take warnings seriously.
This book is perfect for students in middle grades and high school. I would definitely recommend this book. ( )
  Sluper1 | Apr 8, 2015 |
A beautiful novel about the Mirabal sisters, who were brutally murdered by the waning Trujillo regime in the Dominican Republic. It is told in chapters narrated in the very different voices of the four sisters: Ded̩ who survives, Patria the oldest and most Christian, Minerva the activist revolutionary from a young age, and Maria Teresa the baby of the family whose chapters are her diary.

It is also one of the great novels of a semi-totalitarian government and what it means for a group of young women growing up outside the capital. It makes for an interesting pairing with Mario Vargas Llosa's The Feast of the Goat, which covers much of the same period, has some of the same events, but does it all from a different perspective. The difference is that In the Time of the Butterflies is much more subtle. It has the same torture, de facto child rape by Trujillo and other horrors, but all of it is more understated and seen through the eyes of the girls in the story. That all makes the one episode where torture is more directly described that much more powerful. ( )
  nosajeel | Jun 21, 2014 |
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She is plucking her bird of paradise of its dead branches, leaning around the plant every time she hears a car.
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Book description
On a deserted mountain road in the Dominican Republic in 1960, three young women from a pious Catholic family were assassinated after visiting their husbands who had been jailed as suspected rebel leaders. The Mirabal sisters, thus martyred, became mythical figures in their country, where they are known as Las Mariposas (the butterflies). Three decades later, Julia Alvarez, daughter of the Dominican Republic and author of the acclaimed How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents, brings the Mirabal sisters back to life in this extraordinary novel. Each of the sisters speaks in her own voice, beginning as young girls in the 1940s, their stories vary from hair ribbons to gun-running to prison torture. Their story is framed by their surviving sister who tells her own tale of suffering and dedication to the memory of Las Mariposas. This inspired portrait of four women is a haunting statement about the human cost of political oppression, and is destined to take its place alongside Garcia Marquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude and Allende's The House of the Spirits as one of the great 20th-century Latin American novels.
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0452274427, Paperback)

From the author of How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents comes this tale of courage and sisterhood set in the Dominican Republic during the rise of the Trujillo dictatorship. A skillful blend of fact and fiction, In the Time of the Butterflies is inspired by the true story of the three Mirabal sisters who, in 1960, were murdered for their part in an underground plot to overthrow the government. Alvarez breathes life into these historical figures--known as "las mariposas," or "the butterflies," in the underground--as she imagines their teenage years, their gradual involvement with the revolution, and their terror as their dissentience is uncovered.

Alvarez's controlled writing perfectly captures the mounting tension as "the butterflies" near their horrific end. The novel begins with the recollections of Dede, the fourth and surviving sister, who fears abandoning her routines and her husband to join the movement. Alvarez also offers the perspectives of the other sisters: brave and outspoken Minerva, the family's political ringleader; pious Patria, who forsakes her faith to join her sisters after witnessing the atrocities of the tyranny; and the baby sister, sensitive Maria Teresa, who, in a series of diaries, chronicles her allegiance to Minerva and the physical and spiritual anguish of prison life.

In the Time of the Butterflies is an American Library Association Notable Book and a 1995 National Book Critics Circle Award nominee.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:08:32 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

Set during the waning days of the Trujillo dictatorship in the Dominican Republica in 1960, this novel tells the story the Mirabal sisters, three young wives and mothers who are assassinated after visiting their jailed husbands. On a deserted mountain road in the Dominican Republic in 1960, three young women from a pious Catholic family were assassinated after visiting their husbands who had been jailed as suspected rebel leaders. The Mirabal sisters, thus martyred, became mythical figures in their country, where they are known as Las Mariposas (the butterflies). Three decades later, Julia Alvarez, daughter of the Dominican Republic and author of How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents, brings the Mirabal sisters back to life in this novel. Each of the sisters speaks in her own voice; beginning as young girls in the 1940s, their stories vary from hair ribbons to gun-running to prison torture. Their story is framed by their surviving sister who tells her own tale of suffering and dedication to the memory of Las Mariposas. This portrait of four women is a haunting statement about the human cost of political oppression.… (more)

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