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Disappearing Acts by Terry McMillan
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Disappearing Acts

by Terry McMillan

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An urban love story featuring Zora (a teacher) and Franklin (a construction worker) who happens to be a not-quite-yet divorced father of two. Similar to other titles by McMillan, it offers a cute story, likeable if not unique characters and a feel good, let's get smart about love plot. Good read, but nothing out of the ordinary. ( )
  janiereader | Sep 14, 2012 |
Excerpt from www.HomeGirl.typepad.com:
Loved it! The movie is among my favorites...among the first movies I ever owned (Dirty Dancing was the first...my all time favorite movie...it was a gift). I have it on VHS and whenever I'm in the mood, AND one of my VCRs is wired correctly, I watch it. It's out on DVD now, so I'll need to hook that up. This film was the beginning of my love of Sanaa Lathan (Zora), and with the name "Zora". I already knew and loved Zora Neale Hurston, but never considered naming my potential future daughter that until I saw this movie and heard it spoken so many times. And I've always thought very highly of Wesley Snipes' general appearance, so this movie was easily one of my favs. Now about the book...

FULL REVIEW:
http://homegirl.typepad.com/home_girl/2005/11/disappearing_ac.html ( )
  HomeGirlQuel | Apr 14, 2009 |
Wasn't bad, I was on a Terry McMillan spree at the time. Her writing alway left me unfulfiled. ( )
  MsNikki | Nov 2, 2007 |
Not one of my favorites. ( )
  aleshel | Sep 22, 2007 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0451209133, Paperback)

He was tall, dark as bittersweet chocolate, and impossibly gorgeous, with a woman-melting smile. She was pretty and independent, petite and not too skinny, just his type. Franklin Swift was a sometimes-employed construction worker, and a not-quite-divorced daddy of two. Zora Banks was a teacher, singer, songwriter. They met in a Brooklyn brownstone, and there could be no walking away...

In this funny, gritty urban love story, Franklin and Zora join the ranks of fiction's most compelling couples, as they move from Scrabble to sex, from layoffs to the limits of faith and trust. Disappearing Acts is about the mystery of desire and the burdens of the past. It's about respect, what it can and can't survive. And it's about the safe and secret places that only love can find. --

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:38:56 -0400)

(see all 7 descriptions)

Franklin is a young black man, father of two, separated from his wife, who meets Zora, a struggling singer from Ohio. Neither is interested in commitment, but the chemistry is a powerful force.

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