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The hundred thousand kingdoms by N. K.…
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The hundred thousand kingdoms (edition 2010)

by N. K. Jemisin

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,6711374,288 (3.89)207
Member:nkjemisin
Title:The hundred thousand kingdoms
Authors:N. K. Jemisin
Info:New York : Orbit, 2010.
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:fantasy, epic fantasy, gods, romance, female protagonist, PoC protagonist

Work details

The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N. K. Jemisin

  1. 50
    Who Fears Death by Nnedi Okorafor (electronicmemory)
    electronicmemory: Who Fears Death is post-apocalyptic futuristic fantasy and The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms draws from classical sword and sorcery, but both are excellent novels about heroines who have found themselves beset and gifted (or possibly cursed) by powers beyond reckoning, while caught up in a political and supernatural power struggle that spans generations and eventually time itself.… (more)
  2. 51
    The Broken Kingdoms by N. K. Jemisin (electronicmemory)
  3. 30
    The God Engines by John Scalzi (MyriadBooks)
    MyriadBooks: For the tools of chained gods.
  4. 30
    Warbreaker by Brandon Sanderson (souloftherose)
    souloftherose: Both are epic fantasy novels featuring strong female characters and focusing on gods in the respective fantasy worlds and their interactions with humans
  5. 31
    The Sandman: Preludes and Nocturnes by Neil Gaiman (MyriadBooks)
  6. 10
    Dragon Sword and Wind Child by Noriko Ogiwara (kaionvin)
    kaionvin: Dueling gods, reincarnation, child-like characters, and a female protagonist who gets involved in it all.
  7. 21
    The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss (gtfernandezm)
    gtfernandezm: Both are strong first person narrated adventures of out-of-place heroes, and take familiar fantasy tropes and deconstruct them with intelligence and some wit.
  8. 10
    Paladin of Souls by Lois McMaster Bujold (storyjunkie)
  9. 10
    The Initiate by Louise Cooper (luciente)
  10. 00
    Lord of Light by Roger Zelazny (Shrike58)
    Shrike58: The cost of the abuse of divine powers, political & social intrigue, and a sprawling setting.
  11. 11
    Racing the Dark by Alaya Dawn Johnson (PhoenixFalls)
    PhoenixFalls: Another female protagonist dragged into the affairs of the gods in a non-white high fantasy setting.
  12. 00
    The Redemption of Althalus by David Eddings (souloftherose)
    souloftherose: Another epic fantasy tale featuring gods
  13. 00
    Priestess of the White by Trudi Canavan (luciente)
  14. 12
    The Black Jewels Trilogy by Anne Bishop (aboulomania)
  15. 02
    Elfland by Freda Warrington (majkia)
    majkia: both are well-written creative takes on normal fantasy tropes
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» See also 207 mentions

English (136)  German (1)  All languages (137)
Showing 1-5 of 136 (next | show all)
I really enjoyed The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms. It was a quick read, especially compared to most other epic fantasy out there. The narrator has a very compelling voice, and the book played with time and storytelling in some interesting ways. I got sucked in almost immediately.

The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms is about a young woman named Yeine Darr, who’s the granddaughter of the man who rules. When her mother dies, Yeine is unexpectedly brought into the fold of the world’s most powerful family and named one of three heirs. While Yeine may not care for the throne, she’s now at risk in the deadly power struggle.

Except… while that’s all true, there’s much more to the book than that. You see, Yeine’s grandfather controls the world because he control’s four of it’s gods. A long time ago, way before the beginnings of the novel, there was a great battle between the gods of night and day. The loser and three of his children were bound to mortal form and forced to serve the high priest and her ancestors, the head of which is Yeine’s grandfather. And when Yeine begins to find out that the gods have their own plans for her…

Also, it wins points for diversity – the characters are all different skin tones and body types, with Yeine herself being “short and flat and brown as forestwood.” Race is one of the themes dealt with in the book, along with slavery and class.

However, The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms is not without it’s flaws. While it is mostly well written, whenever it got into a romance scene it had a tendency to head for purple prose. After a while I started skimming those sections or skipping them outright. I don’t think I missed much – if the other reviews are anything to go by, skipping these sections probably improved my overall impression of the book. The entire romance plot set up was very cliched in the first place. The “misunderstood, totally powerful, bad-boy love interest” has been done so many times before.

Anyway, I overall liked The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms and would certainly recommend it to any fantasy fans, particularly those looking for something a bit different than the usual run.

Originally posted at The Illustrated Page. ( )
  pwaites | Sep 15, 2014 |
There are a lot of good things about this book, but also a lot of issues that I have with the writing.

Yeine is a Baroness of a militant back-waters country that has suddenly been recalled to Sky, the city of the most powerful man lives - her grandfather. She is told that she is one of the three candidates to succeed her grandfather and is thrown into a court of intrigue and mystery. But this is no normal city because here there are enslaved gods and her mother's mystery to solve.

There is an interesting world concept that I find particularly interesting, as enslaved gods are a novel idea and quite intriguing. However, we are stuck in one location -the palace- for most of the book's duration. So I suppose it's less of a world building than a specific plot point.

I hate how the story is formatted. It's so terribly streamofconsciounesss that the flow is broken many many times. It's frustrating when you hit a point in the story and all of a sudden she jumps to another topic and says, oh by the way, here's a history about the gods. Sometimes it works and doesn't hurt the flow, but it happens so many times and sometimes in such inopportune moments that it's a negative point for me. She jumps back in forth in time and in plot as well as give crucial background information through these little slices that cut into the plot. Annoying. I'd rather learn the information through scenes that push the plot forward.

There are plot holes. Things that don't make sense~ There was no explanation for how she finds out she's a sacrifice, but yet is told she is one of the candidates to succeed Dekarth. She only learns that she's a sacrifice on her own time - so when would she have found it?
The succession seemed more like a joke story than anything else, for as much plot time it got. It mostly revolved around Yeine learning about the gods. I feel like the story tried to incorporate several different plots and weave it into one (like LOTR), but it only did so clumsily. There were many loose ends that didn't get tied up at the end. I just feel like there wasn't enough insight into the character's depth to accommodate the actions they did. Not good enough.

The romance was a little weird....

The ending was respectable. Not too shabby, but a little too deus ex machina in more ways than one, heh.

It's a trilogy, but I'm not sure if I'm tempted enough to pick up the second book. Worth a look if you're bored and you want an average fantasy novel, but I wouldn't recommend it to anyone looking for something to blow them out of the water. ( )
  NineLarks | Sep 15, 2014 |
There are a lot of good things about this book, but also a lot of issues that I have with the writing.

Yeine is a Baroness of a militant back-waters country that has suddenly been recalled to Sky, the city of the most powerful man lives - her grandfather. She is told that she is one of the three candidates to succeed her grandfather and is thrown into a court of intrigue and mystery. But this is no normal city because here there are enslaved gods and her mother's mystery to solve.

There is an interesting world concept that I find particularly interesting, as enslaved gods are a novel idea and quite intriguing. However, we are stuck in one location -the palace- for most of the book's duration. So I suppose it's less of a world building than a specific plot point.

I hate how the story is formatted. It's so terribly streamofconsciounesss that the flow is broken many many times. It's frustrating when you hit a point in the story and all of a sudden she jumps to another topic and says, oh by the way, here's a history about the gods. Sometimes it works and doesn't hurt the flow, but it happens so many times and sometimes in such inopportune moments that it's a negative point for me. She jumps back in forth in time and in plot as well as give crucial background information through these little slices that cut into the plot. Annoying. I'd rather learn the information through scenes that push the plot forward.

There are plot holes. Things that don't make sense~ There was no explanation for how she finds out she's a sacrifice, but yet is told she is one of the candidates to succeed Dekarth. She only learns that she's a sacrifice on her own time - so when would she have found it?
The succession seemed more like a joke story than anything else, for as much plot time it got. It mostly revolved around Yeine learning about the gods. I feel like the story tried to incorporate several different plots and weave it into one (like LOTR), but it only did so clumsily. There were many loose ends that didn't get tied up at the end. I just feel like there wasn't enough insight into the character's depth to accommodate the actions they did. Not good enough.

The romance was a little weird....

The ending was respectable. Not too shabby, but a little too deus ex machina in more ways than one, heh.

It's a trilogy, but I'm not sure if I'm tempted enough to pick up the second book. Worth a look if you're bored and you want an average fantasy novel, but I wouldn't recommend it to anyone looking for something to blow them out of the water. ( )
  NineLarks | Sep 15, 2014 |
I enjoyed the idea of this book – of Gods stuck in mortal bodies. The first person perspective was okay as well, however I sometimes had a hard time following the jumping around. I thought that could have been handled a bit better. But for a debut novel it was pretty good and unique. I am very interested in the next book. It looks as if it is connected but very different. Instead of focusing on the elite, the next book will focus on the poor and a man learning to accept what he finds insignificant. More gods stuck in mortal bodies. The idea intrigues me just as much as with this book. It was certainly not a waste of time to read if you’re a fantasy fan. ( )
1 vote Kassilem | Jul 25, 2014 |
Plot: 3 1/2 stars
Characters: 3 1/2 stars
Style: 5 stars
Pace: 4 stars

Strange, almost lilting, almost but not quite haunting. I never could quite get absorbed in it the way I wanted to, the plot was so thin as to be non-existent, and the main character had so little personality of her own as to become almost invisible... But it worked, perhaps because of that. Strange, but ultimately good. ( )
  Jami_Leigh | Jun 22, 2014 |
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» Add other authors (3 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Jemisin, N. K.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Freeman, CasaundraNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nielsen, CliffCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Panepinto, LaurenCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Book description
Yeine Darr is an outcast from the barbarian north. But when her mother dies under mysterious circumstances, she is summoned to the majestic city of Sky - a palace above the clouds where gods' and mortals' lives are intertwined. There, to her shock, Yeine is named one of the potential heirs to the king. But the throne of the Hundred Thousand Kingdoms is not easily won, and Yeine is thrust into a vicious power struggle with a pair of cousins she never knew she had. As she fights for her life, she draws ever closer to the secrets of her mother's death and her family's bloody history. But it's not just mortals who have secrets worth hiding and Yeine will learn how perilous the world can be when love and hate - and gods and mortals - are bound inseparably.
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Yeine Darr is an outcast from the barbarian north. But when her mother dies under mysterious circumstances, she is summoned to the majestic city of Sky. There, to her shock, Yeine is named an heiress to the king. But the throne of the Hundred Thousand Kingdoms is not easily won, and Yeine is thrust into a vicious power struggle.… (more)

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Editions: 0316043915, 0316043923

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