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Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer by Barbara…
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Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer (1976)

by Barbara Shook Hazen

Other authors: Robert L. May, Richard Scarry (Illustrator)

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582316,969 (4.02)5
Recently added bylearn2laugh, private library, karen.lea, CorinasQuill, satchmo77, mmefford
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» See also 5 mentions

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Wonderful when you're six or seven years old, up to maybe 11? In combination with Gene Autry singing on the old 78 rpm, "Ru-dolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer/ Had a very shine-yy nose / And if you ever saw-wit,/ you would even say IT GLOWS..."
Why I say it may be good to age eleven: the theme of course is rejection by one's peers, "They never let poor Rudolph / Play in any reindeer games." Rejection by peers is a common misgiving of kids and early adolescents--as well as, according to the adds for acne medicine and hair and skin and nail and clothes products, many adults as well.
But, Then one foggy Christmas Eve, Santa drafted Rudolph as a headlight. Then all the reindeer loved him, he having become an Historic Figure in the Reindeer-Christmas world. This is a story of a social difference, and a physical handicap working to great social advantage.
And it was written long before handicaps gained any status as general concerns. I must have read it around 1950. Yikes. The (slightly) greater part of a century ago. ( )
  AlanWPowers | Dec 27, 2012 |
cute rudolph book! everyone should read it!
  ashtonrice | Apr 2, 2009 |
Rudolph the Red-Nose Reindeer is a folktale because reindeer aren't equipped to fly and Santa isn't a real magical man. This is a story that has been passed down from generation to generation and still remains today.
The plot is very climatical and illustrates a very clear beginning, middle and end. The end is happy because Rudolph gets to lead Santa and his sleigh due to his bright nose. Overall the story was very engaging. ( )
  al04 | Oct 30, 2007 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Hazen, Barbara Shookprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
May, Robert L.secondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Scarry, RichardIllustratorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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Once there was a reindeer named Rudolph, who lived at the North Pole, in Toyland.
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Please do not combine Barbara Shook Hazen's Rudolphs with Robert L. May's Rudolphs. He wrote the book; she made adaptations.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0307020711, Hardcover)

Teased by the other reindeer because of his glowing red nose, Rudolph becomes a hero when his nose is used to lead Santa and his reindeer team through some bad weather, in the favorite Christmas poem.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:58:14 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

Although the other reindeer laugh at him because of his bright red nose, Rudolph proves his worth when he is chosen to lead Santa Claus's sleigh on a foggy night.

» see all 2 descriptions

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