HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Final Solution: A Story of Detection…
Loading...

The Final Solution: A Story of Detection (P.S.) (original 2004; edition 2005)

by Michael Chabon

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,718None2,169 (3.39)106
Member:andreablythe
Title:The Final Solution: A Story of Detection (P.S.)
Authors:Michael Chabon
Info:Harper Perennial (2005), Paperback, 160 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****1/2
Tags:literary, mystery, illustrated, read in 2012, 12 in 12 Challenge

Work details

The Final Solution: A Story of Detection by Michael Chabon (2004)

2005 (12) 2008 (12) 21st century (11) American (26) American literature (18) audio (12) crime (30) detective (48) England (52) fiction (472) first edition (16) historical (16) historical fiction (30) Holmes (20) Holocaust (49) Jewish (16) literary fiction (11) literature (30) mystery (266) novel (62) novella (36) own (11) parrots (35) pastiche (25) read (47) Sherlock Holmes (139) signed (16) to-read (33) unread (27) WWII (80)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 106 mentions

English (112)  Spanish (2)  German (1)  Dutch (1)  All languages (116)
Showing 1-5 of 112 (next | show all)
Back in 8th grade Language Arts I went through a phase of reading all the Edgar Allen Poe and Arthur Conan Doyle I could find. I'm pretty sure I read all the Holmes stories -- they held my attention better than the Poe for some reason (less baroque language maybe?) -- but my point is that I enjoyed this Chabon novella so much because it's essentially Sherlock Holmes fanfic.

Which is to say, it's odd, unrealistic, somewhat endearing, and detached enough that the reader doesn't get terribly invested in any one character. That isn't a strength of the form, btw, just a feature of it. The strength is in Chabon's gorgeous way with language. Reading his prose is like swimming through a dictionary. ( )
  sageness | Feb 7, 2014 |
To start with, I love short books. This one is a small gem. It is not so much about the holocaust or even Sherlock Holmes as it is about old age, reason, sorrow and madness. But it is still great fun and so wonderfully written I read passages aloud. The ornateness fits the subject. I admit my favorite chapter was written from the parrot's point of view. ( )
  liliannattel | Feb 6, 2014 |
I should have known after prior experience that Michael Chabon would pen a story both emotional and intelligent, this being the tale of the unnamed detective's decline into being, well, simply something less than he once was.

Though his name is never spoken, our elderly recluse with a stellar reputation and a penchant for bees is obviously none other than Sherlock Holmes. And when he is asked to look into a murder and the disappearance of a beloved bird, he attempts to step back into his well-accustomed role. And while it's true that he is still more capable than most anyone else, he also starts to experience the new limitations of his body and mind.

This was such a beautiful meditation on Holmes and his legacy and his inevitable decline. One can only muse on what it would be like to lose even a touch of one's genius to the aging process. It almost makes one understand why Holmes would choose to die young if given the chance (or would he?).

http://webereading.com/2014/01/long-awaited-reads-month-final-solution.html ( )
  klpm | Jan 25, 2014 |
This is the second book I've read by Chabon and he's two for two with me. It was a quick, enjoyable read with entertaining, if not a bit two-dimensional, characters. A couple times vague descriptions caused some confusion, but the story was solid and well-paced. There was even a chapter from the point of view of a parrot, which left me a bit apprehensive at first but I came to enjoy it quite a bit by the end of the chapter. I am glad that the book had a distinct personality apart from Kavalier and Clay and I'm excited to read more of his work. ( )
  davadog13 | Nov 21, 2013 |
Original and quite charming, but very slight. Could have been fleshed out much more, I thought. Chabon is a great writer, but sometimes the style was a bit overwrought, overly clever, taking away from the plot in my view.

Nice illustrations by Jay Ryan! ( )
  evaberry | Nov 5, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 112 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (2 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Michael Chabonprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ryan, JayIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
York, MichaelNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
The distinction's always fine between detection and invention. - Mary Jo Salter
Dedication
To the memory of Amanda Davis, first reader of these pages
First words
A boy with a parrot on his shoulder was walking along the railroad tracks.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
The Final Solution is a 2004 novel by Michael Chabon. It is a detective story that in many ways pays homage to the writings of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and other writers of the genre. The story, set in 1944, revolves around an unnamed 89-year-old long-retired detective (who may or may not be Sherlock Holmes but is always called just "the old man"), now interested mostly in beekeeping, and his quest to find a missing parrot, the only friend of a mute Jewish boy. The title of the novel references Doyle's Sherlock Holmes story "The Final Problem," in which Holmes confronts his greatest enemy, Professor Moriarty, at Reichenbach Falls, and the Final Solution, the Nazis' plan for the genocide of the Jewish people.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0060777109, Paperback)

Retired to the English countryside, an eighty-nine-year-old man, rumored to be a once-famous detective, is more concerned with his beekeeping than with his fellow man. Into his life wanders Linus Steinman, nine years old and mute, who has escaped from Nazi Germany with his sole companion: an African gray parrot.

What is the meaning of the mysterious strings of German numbers the bird spews out -- a top-secret SS code? The keys to a series of Swiss bank accounts? Or do they hold a significance both more prosaic and far more sinister?

Though the solution may be beyond even the reach of the once-famous sleuth, the true story of the boy and his parrot is subtly revealed in a wrenching resolution.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:23:39 -0400)

(see all 7 descriptions)

Retired to the English countryside, an eighty-nine-year-old man, rumored to be a once-famous detective, is more concerned with his beekeeping than with his fellow man. Into his life wanders Linus Steinman, nine years old and mute, who has escaped from Nazi Germany with his sole companion : an African gray parrot. What is the meaning of the mysterious strings of German numbers the bird spews out-a top secret SS code? The keys to a series of Swiss bank accounts? Or do they hold a significance both more prosaic and far more sinister?… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 7 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
30 avail.
53 wanted
2 pay4 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.39)
0.5
1 13
1.5 9
2 72
2.5 28
3 249
3.5 73
4 225
4.5 22
5 64

Audible.com

Two editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

See editions

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 89,414,518 books! | Top bar: Always visible