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The Year of the Flood (2009)

by Margaret Atwood

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: MaddAddam Trilogy (2)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
6,0913351,154 (3.92)627
From the Publisher: The times and species have been changing at a rapid rate, and the social compact is wearing as thin as environmental stability. Adam One, the kindly leader of the God's Gardeners-a religion devoted to the melding of science and religion, as well as the preservation of all plant and animal life-has long predicted a natural disaster that will alter Earth as we know it. Now it has occurred, obliterating most human life. Two women have survived: Ren, a young trapeze dancer locked inside the high-end sex club Scales and Tails, and Toby, a God's Gardener barricaded inside a luxurious spa where many of the treatments are edible. Have others survived? Ren's bioartist friend Amanda? Zeb, her eco-fighter stepfather? Her onetime lover, Jimmy? Or the murderous Painballers, survivors of the mutual-elimination Painball prison? Not to mention the shadowy, corrupt policing force of the ruling powers. Meanwhile, gene-spliced life forms are proliferating: the lion/lamb blends, the Mo'hair sheep with human hair, the pigs with human brain tissue. As Adam One and his intrepid hemp-clad band make their way through this strange new world, Ren and Toby will have to decide on their next move, but they can't stay locked away. By turns dark, tender, violent, thoughtful, and uneasily hilarious, The Year of the Flood is Atwood at her most brilliant and inventive.… (more)
  1. 240
    Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood (haeji)
  2. 180
    The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood (smiteme)
  3. 60
    Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro (DCBlack)
  4. 30
    MaddAddam by Margaret Atwood (Philosofiction)
  5. 52
    The Windup Girl by Paolo Bacigalupi (souloftherose)
    souloftherose: Another novel about a dystopian future with strong environmental themes.
  6. 20
    A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess (Anonymous user)
  7. 00
    Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel (sturlington)
  8. 22
    Epitaph Road by David Patneaude (eenerd)
    eenerd: Another interesting look into bio/eco-warfare fallout.
  9. 11
    Shelter by Susan Palwick (wifilibrarian)
    wifilibrarian: Covers these similar themes near future, ecological collapse, eco-christian religion, female main characters, families and friendships.
  10. 01
    A Friend of the Earth by T.C. Boyle (JuliaMaria)
    JuliaMaria: Dystopien bzgl. kommender Umweltkatastrophen
  11. 01
    The World Without Us by Alan Weisman (Niecierpek)
  12. 45
    The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins (hbsweet)
  13. 23
    Pure by Julianna Baggott (eenerd)
  14. 02
    The Prepper Room by Karen Duve (JuliaMaria)
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» See also 627 mentions

English (321)  Catalan (6)  Finnish (3)  Swedish (1)  German (1)  Dutch (1)  Norwegian (1)  Danish (1)  All languages (335)
Showing 1-5 of 321 (next | show all)
Toby, Ren & The Gardeners. An engaging read from cover to cover beautifully interwoven with the first part. ( )
  sami7 | Aug 3, 2020 |
I keep accidentally getting unabridged audiobooks- must stop. Took way too long to build up and become invested in the characters. Really picked up at the end but wasn't worth all the waiting. ( )
  luzdelsol | Jul 31, 2020 |
I really do love Margaret Atwood. It seems sometimes that it's cool to find her shallow or pretentious or whatever but I always love reading her. Although I won't lie about the fact that I take great pleasure in tagging her books "sci-fi" even though they don't contain talking squids in outer space.
I really liked Toby. I'm so interested in Adam One's story. I love all the saints Atwood created (you can see a list of them (with links) here http://theyearoftheflood.weebly.com/kristina-lidstone/saints). I love that all her invented words are so awkwardly portmanteaued to the point where I really want to hear the audiobook to learn how I'm supposed to be pronouncing CorpSeCorps. Rakunk! Liobam! I feel like she deliberately chose the most ugly combination. I still really don't like Crake, but I like not liking him. Excited to read the third. ( )
  katebrarian | Jul 28, 2020 |
The second installment of the MaddAddam brings us into the chaos and aftermath of Crakes master plan. You are following Ren, Amanda, and Toby through the navigation of this new world. The genetically modified animals are running lose and quickly you find they are evolving. The crakers have been taken to safety by Jimmy-the-snowman much to his annoyance. Overall a quality sequel to MaddAddam Atwood at her best yet again. ( )
  BuffyCharpentier | Jul 26, 2020 |
LOVED IT. Atwood really blew this one out of the water.

As good as Oryx and Crake was, the POV character was really hard to like (which I thought occasionally bled over into the author's storytelling as well - see my review on goodreads). It was a weakness in an otherwise great book.

This one, though. WOW. We see the apocalypse from the perspective of the lower classes, the ones who don't live in hyperprivileged corp compounds, who have to scrounge and fight to survive. The heart of the book is the doomsday cult mentiioned onyl in passing in Oryx and Crake, the God's Gardeners, and these guys? They are a work of genius. I've been a staunch and occasionally "militant" atheist since I was old enough to wonder about God (~10 yrs old), but I'd be a God's Gardeners in a heartbeat. Adam One's sermons, the saints (St. Dian Fossey! St Stephen J Gould!) and the feast days, the songs praising every part of the biosphere from worms to predators, the idea of going back to earth in the midst of an apocalypse wrought of humanity's movement in the opposite direction.. All brilliant.

Equally brilliant is the depiction of the lives of women in this new era, how so little has changed sociologically for women while so much has changed technologically. Even the awesome Toby excuses and condones child molesters within their midst saying "At least he only touched the *girls*, not the boys." And yet the threat of sexual assault hangs over all the women, often realized but present even when not. The women are always looking over their shoulders, just as a matter of course, almost unnoticed by the reader.

I wish there was similar mention made of race and racism. But no. Race does not exist anymore, apparently, as a sociological phenomenon. Hard to believe. Atwood dropped the ball here.

More happens in this book than happens in Oryx and Crake. It is not all flashback, and even the flashbacks contain more action and more dialogue. There is humor flowing through this depressing book like a dark underground creek, the kind you're afraid to drink freely from for fear of where it's coming from.

I'm having a hard time getting my thoughts in order, into any sort of coherent flow, but there you have it. This book is good. Read it. ( )
  nandiniseshadri | Jul 12, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 321 (next | show all)
Om Margaret Atwoods ”Syndaflodens år” kommer att räknas till de stora framtidsskildringarna går inte att säga ännu, men potentialen finns.
 
In Hieronymus Bosch–like detail, Atwood renders this civilization and these two lives within it with tenderness and insight, a healthy dread, and a guarded humor.
 
"The Year of the Flood" is a slap-happy romp through the end times. Stuffed with cornball hymns, genetic mutations worthy of Thomas Pynchon (such as the rakuunk, a combined skunk and raccoon) and a pharmaceutical company run amok, it reads like dystopia verging on satire. She may be imagining a world in flames, but she's doing it with a dark cackle.
 
Personally, though, I prefer Atwood in a retro mood. I’d easily take “Alias Grace” or “The Blind Assassin” over the lucid nightmares of “The Handmaid’s Tale” or “Oryx and Crake.” But fans of those novels should grab a biohazard suit, crawl into a hermetically sealed fallout shelter, and dive right in.
 
Canada's greatest living novelist undoubtedly knows how to tell a gripping story, as fans of "The Blind Assassin" and "The Handmaid's Tale" already know. But here there's a serious message, too: Look at what we're doing right now to our world, to nature, to ourselves. If this goes on . . .
 

» Add other authors (14 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Margaret Atwoodprimary authorall editionscalculated
Bramhall, MarkReadersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Drews, KristiinaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
THE GARDEN

Who is it tends the Garden,
The Garden oh so green?

’Twas once the finest Garden
That ever has been seen.

And in it God’s dear Creatures
Did swim and fly and play;

But then came greedy Spoilers,
And killed them all away.

And all the Trees that flourished
And gave us wholesome fruit,

By waves of sand are buried,
Both leaf and branch and root.

And all the shining Water
Is turned to slime and mire,

And all the feathered Birds so bright
Have ceased their joyful choir.

Oh Garden, oh my Garden
I’ll mourn forevermore
Until the Gardeners arise,
And you to Life restore.

From The God’s Gardeners Oral Hymnbook
Dedication
For Graeme and Jess
First words
In the early morning Toby climbs up to the rooftop to watch the sunrise.
Quotations
Maybe sadness was a kind of hunger, she thought. Maybe the two went together.
“Who lives here?” she says out loud. Not me, she thinks. This thing I’m doing can hardly be called living. Instead I’m lying dormant, like a bacterium in a glacier. Getting time over with. That’s all.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Book description
The times and species have been changing at a rapid rate, and the social compact is wearing as thin as environmental stability. Adam One, the kindly leader of the God's Gardeners--a religion devoted to the melding of science and religion, as well as the preservation of all plant and animal life--has long predicted a natural disaster that will alter Earth as we know it. Now it has occurred, obliterating most human life. Two women have survived: Ren, a young trapeze dancer locked inside the high-end sex club Scales and Tails, and Toby, a God's Gardener barricaded inside a luxurious spa where many of the treatments are edible. The long-awaited new novel from Margaret Atwood. The Year of the Flood is a dystopic masterpiece and a testament to her visionary power.

Have others survived? Ren's bioartist friend Amanda? Zeb, her eco-fighter stepfather? Her onetime lover, Jimmy? Or the murderous Painballers, survivors of the mutual-elimination Painball prison? Not to mention the shadowy, corrupt policing force of the ruling powers...

Meanwhile, gene-spliced life forms are proliferating: the lion/lamb blends, the Mo'hair sheep with human hair, the pigs with human brain tissue. As Adam One and his intrepid hemp-clad band make their way through this strange new world, Ren and Toby will have to decide on their next move. They can't stay locked away...

By turns dark, tender, violent, thoughtful, and uneasily hilarious, The Year of the Flood is Atwood at her most brilliant and inventive.

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