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If Not for the Cat by Jack Prelutsky
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If Not for the Cat

by Jack Prelutsky

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Showing 1-5 of 47 (next | show all)
Summary:
If Not For The Cat is a series of Haiku poems about different animals. None of the poems actually call the animals by name but instead give clues as to the type of animal. It also includes illustration of each animal.

Personal Reaction:
This is not my favorite children's poetry but I do think it would be a good way to introduce a unit on Haiku poems. I also think it would be good as a beginning introduction to a poetry unit, as the poems are brief and simple.

Classroom Extensions:
1.) Ask the students to pick an animal that is not included in the book and write their own Haiku about it.
2.) Ask the students to write another haiku about an object of their choosing. However, this poem cannot include the name of the item. Once they are done have them share their poems and allow the other students to guess which object they were referencing. ( )
  TCollins90 | Nov 21, 2017 |
A beautiful collection of haiku poems, each describing an animal without naming it, creating a riddle. Each page's illustration paints the picture to support the words, and a "Who is Who" index provided names the creatures.
An excerpt: "How foolish I am./Why am I drawn to the flame/Which extinguishes?"
Beautifully illustrated with watercolors and india ink brush drawings. Provides an interactive experience to engage children in poetry.
  tina_w | Jul 17, 2016 |
A creature whispers:If not for the cat,And the scarcity of cheese,I could be content.Who is this creature?What does it like to eat?Can you solve the riddle?Seventeen haiku composed by master poet Jack Prelutsky and illustrated by renowned artist Ted Rand ask you to think about seventeen favorite residents of the animal kingdom in a new way. On these glorious and colorful pages you will meet a mouse, a skunk, a beaver, a hummingbird, ants, bald eagles, jellyfish, and many others. Who is who? The answer is right in front of you. But how can you tell? Think and wonder and look and puzzle it out!
  wichitafriendsschool | Mar 25, 2016 |
Summary:
This book of Haikus is about different animals. Because Haikus are usually very short, it was like a guessing games as each ones described an animal with only descriptive words but never gave the name of the animal.

My Personal Reaction:
I thought this was a really cool way to teach young children about Haikus. When I was in school the Haikus were kind of short and left me wondering how in the world is that poetry. I like that this kind of made poetry into a guessing game not only helping them to understand the type of poetry, but also that it helped them recognize and utilize the descriptive words in trying to guess the animal.

Classroom Extension Ideas:
1. As a class, we could each write a haiku about our favorite animal and play a guessing game as each student tries to figure out the other's animal.
2. We could compare this to other forms of poetry and list the differences in each. ( )
  JacquelynTorres | Apr 14, 2015 |
Summary: These poems were all Haikus. Each Haiku described a specific animal without telling the reader who the animal was. Each description gave a background and who the anima was and what they did.

Personal Reaction: The illustrations were beautiful and the descriptions of each animal would help young children understand where those animals came from.

Classroom Extension Ideas:
1)Divide the class into teams and while reading the story, see how many animals the students can guess. Keep a tally throughout the story.
2)After explaining what a Haiku is, have the students try and write their own. ( )
  SarahMoore | Apr 14, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 47 (next | show all)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0060596775, Hardcover)

A creature whispers:

If not for the cat,
And the scarcity of cheese,
I could be content.

Who is this creature?
What does it like to eat?
Can you solve the riddle?

Seventeen haiku composed by master poet Jack Prelutsky and illustrated by renowned artist Ted Rand ask you to think about seventeen favorite residents of the animal kingdom in a new way. On these glorious and colorful pages you will meet a mouse, a skunk, a beaver, a hummingbird, ants, bald eagles, jellyfish, and many others. Who is who? The answer is right in front of you. But how can you tell? Think and wonder and look and puzzle it out!

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:25:41 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

Haiku-like poems describe a variety of animals.

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