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Galapagos: A Novel (Delta Fiction) by Kurt…
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Galapagos: A Novel (Delta Fiction) (original 1985; edition 1999)

by Kurt Vonnegut

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6,560651,002 (3.8)105
Observed by a ghost of the Vietnam War for one million years, the descendants of survivors of a cruise to the Galapagos Archipielago prove Darwin's Theory of Evolution. The ghost of a shipbuilder tells the story of an ill-fated cruise to the Galapagos Islands.
Member:paulmarculescu
Title:Galapagos: A Novel (Delta Fiction)
Authors:Kurt Vonnegut
Info:Dial Press Trade Paperback (1999), Edition: Reissue, Paperback, 336 pages
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Galápagos by Kurt Vonnegut (1985)

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» See also 105 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 65 (next | show all)
this might be the greatest book created by (over-sized) human minds ( )
  subspacer | Mar 25, 2020 |
human race destroyed except for ship in Galapagos, devolves to marine mammals
  ritaer | Mar 19, 2020 |
First Vonnegut novel I read ( )
  evil_cyclist | Mar 16, 2020 |
A story of evolution as a small group of humans become stranded as the world ends. Over a couple of generations we see them change into a new type of being. Very witty and insightful and a classic of the dystopian genre.
  DevilStateDan | Feb 11, 2020 |
I liked the disjointed, chronological but not narrative and in a weird way it was very comforting. Its been 30 years since this book was written and we haven't destroyed ourselves yet, even though we think we are right on the cusp of it (and did 30 years ago, too). We are our own biggest enemies (that "big brain" thing), yet maybe what makes that the case is also what makes us human? What defines a human and what makes them worthwhile? Composing symphonies or philosophical knowledge or getting so drunk you can't properly navigate? Anyway, an entertaining, odd and interesting read that brings up some interesting questions but not in a way that will haunt you if you can't discover an answer. ( )
  Aug3Zimm | Nov 12, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 65 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (26 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Kurt Vonnegutprimary authorall editionscalculated
Marsh, JamesCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
In spite of everything, I still believe people are really good at heart.

Anne Frank (1929-1945)
Dedication
In memory of Hillis L. Howie (1903-1982),
amateur naturalist -
A good man who
took me and my best friend Ben Hitz
and some other boys
out to the American Wild West
from Indianapolis, Indiana,
in the summer of 1938

Mr Howie introduced us to real Indians
and had us sleep out-of-doors every night
and bury our dung,
and taught us how to ride horses,
and told us the names of many plants and animals,
and what they needed to do
in order to stay alive
and reproduce themselves.

One night Mr Howie scared us half to death
on purpose,
screaming like a wildcat near our camp.
A real wildcat screamed back.
First words
The thing was:
One million years ago, back in A.D. 1986, Guayaquil was the chief seaport of the little South American democracy of Ecuador, whose capital was Quito, high in the Andes Mountains.
Quotations
Mary had also taught that the human brain was the most admirable survival device yet produced by evolution. But now her own big brain was urging her to take the polyethylene garment bag from around a red evening dress in her closet in Guayaquil, and to wrap it around her head, thus depriving her cells of oxygen.
"I'll tell you what the human soul is, Mary," he whispered, his eyes closed. "Animals don't have one. It's the part of you that knows when your brain isn't working right. I always knew, Mary. There wasn't anything I could do about it, but I always knew."
As for the meaning of the courtship dance of the blue-footed boobies: The birds are huge molecules with bright blue feet and have no choice in the matter. By their very nature, they have to dance exactly like that.
Human beings used to be molecules which could do many, many different sorts of dances, or decline to dance at all - as they pleased. My mother could do the waltz, the tango, the rumba, the Charleston, the Lindy Hop, the jitterbug, the Watusi, and the twist. Father refused to do any dances, as was his privilege.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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ISBN 0385333870 is for Galápagos by Kurt Vonnegut
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