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God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater: A Novel by…
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God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater: A Novel (original 1965; edition 1998)

by Kurt Vonnegut (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
5,493441,341 (3.87)138
Second only to Slaughterhouse-Five of Vonnegut's canon in its prominence and influence, God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater (1965) presents Eliot Rosewater, an itinerant, semi-crazed millionaire wandering the country in search of heritage and philanthropic outcome, introducing the science fiction writer Kilgore Trout to the world and Vonnegut to the collegiate audience which would soon make him a cult writer. Trout, modeled according to Vonnegut on the science fiction writer Theodore Sturgeon (with whom Vonnegut had an occasional relationship) is a desperate, impoverished but visionary hack writer who functions for Eliot Rosewater as both conscience and horrid example. Rosewater, seeking to put his inheritance to some meaningful use (his father was an entrepreneur), tries to do good within the context of almost illimitable cynicism and corruption. It is in this novel that Rosewater wanders into a science fiction conference--an actual annual event in Milford, Pennsylvania--and at the motel delivers his famous monologue evoked by science fiction writers and critics for almost half a century: "None of you can write for sour apples... but you're the only people trying to come to terms with the really terrific things which are happening today." Money does not drive Mr. Rosewater (or the corrupt lawyer who tries to shape the Rosewater fortune) so much as outrage at the human condition. The novel was adapted for a 1979 Alan Menken musical.… (more)
Member:pangurb
Title:God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater: A Novel
Authors:Kurt Vonnegut (Author)
Info:Dial Press Trade Paperback (1998), 288 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*1/2
Tags:Eng, Original

Work details

God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater by Kurt Vonnegut (1965)

  1. 20
    Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut (Anonymous user)
    Anonymous user: Elliot Rosewater, the main character of God Bless You, Mr Rosewater, appears in Slaughterhouse-Five. Also, they both feature books from fictional author Kilgore Trout.
  2. 20
    The Loved One by Evelyn Waugh (hazzabamboo)
    hazzabamboo: Both are funny satires of America - Waugh is more vicious.
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» See also 138 mentions

English (43)  Hungarian (1)  All languages (44)
Showing 1-5 of 43 (next | show all)
Hilarious. Bonus: one can read it and laugh without the horrified guilt that hangs over the reading of Mother Night because it is only about the bad stuff we do to poor people and basically nice white people are all in agreement that it's okay to live better at the expense of poor people.

I would love to pull bits of this out to show you how funny it is. The scene where Eliot gives money to the poet so that the poet can tell the truth and the poet discovers he has no truth to tell. He only thought he did while he rationalised that poverty prevented him from doing so.

Rest here:

http://alittleteaalittlechat.wordpress.com/2014/06/30/god-bless-you-mr-rosewater... ( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |
Hilarious. Bonus: one can read it and laugh without the horrified guilt that hangs over the reading of Mother Night because it is only about the bad stuff we do to poor people and basically nice white people are all in agreement that it's okay to live better at the expense of poor people.

I would love to pull bits of this out to show you how funny it is. The scene where Eliot gives money to the poet so that the poet can tell the truth and the poet discovers he has no truth to tell. He only thought he did while he rationalised that poverty prevented him from doing so.

Rest here:

http://alittleteaalittlechat.wordpress.com/2014/06/30/god-bless-you-mr-rosewater... ( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |
I think I would have enjoyed this more if I had read it as a teen, and the ending was underwhelming. But generally fun and wild and readable. ( )
  jostie13 | May 14, 2020 |
Timeless satire about the haves and have-nots in America. ( )
  revafisheye | Jan 10, 2020 |
There's not really much of a plot to this book, but what plot there is, is a wonderful vehicle for the message Vonnegut was trying to portray, and as funny as anything else he wrote, the ending in particular had me in stitches. After reading some reviews for starting, I was a bit worried I was going to feel "preached" at, but despite making no attempts to hide his agenda, I never felt that Vonnegut was being sacramental. I think on reflection, this is by far my favourite Vonnegut book to date. ( )
  Fardo | Oct 15, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 43 (next | show all)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Kurt Vonnegutprimary authorall editionscalculated
Kapari, MarjattaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
"The Second World War was over - and there I was at high noon, crossing Times Square with a Purple Heart on." -- Eliot Rosewater, President, The Rosewater Foundation
Dedication
Information from the Italian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Ad Alvin Davis, il telepata, l'amico dei gangster
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A sum of money is a leading character in this tale about people, just as a sum of honey might properly be a leading character in a tale about bees.
Quotations
He coined a new word for Sylvia's disease, "Samaritrophia," which he said meant, "hysterical indifference to the troubles of those less fortunate than oneself."
"It seems to me," said Trout, "that the main lesson Eliot learned is that people can use all the uncritical love they can get."
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Second only to Slaughterhouse-Five of Vonnegut's canon in its prominence and influence, God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater (1965) presents Eliot Rosewater, an itinerant, semi-crazed millionaire wandering the country in search of heritage and philanthropic outcome, introducing the science fiction writer Kilgore Trout to the world and Vonnegut to the collegiate audience which would soon make him a cult writer. Trout, modeled according to Vonnegut on the science fiction writer Theodore Sturgeon (with whom Vonnegut had an occasional relationship) is a desperate, impoverished but visionary hack writer who functions for Eliot Rosewater as both conscience and horrid example. Rosewater, seeking to put his inheritance to some meaningful use (his father was an entrepreneur), tries to do good within the context of almost illimitable cynicism and corruption. It is in this novel that Rosewater wanders into a science fiction conference--an actual annual event in Milford, Pennsylvania--and at the motel delivers his famous monologue evoked by science fiction writers and critics for almost half a century: "None of you can write for sour apples... but you're the only people trying to come to terms with the really terrific things which are happening today." Money does not drive Mr. Rosewater (or the corrupt lawyer who tries to shape the Rosewater fortune) so much as outrage at the human condition. The novel was adapted for a 1979 Alan Menken musical.

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