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Modern Poetry and the Idea of Language: A…
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Modern Poetry and the Idea of Language: A Critical and Historical Study…

by Gerald L. Bruns

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201515,329 (3)None

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Bruns gives a useful, compelling account of two different impulses of modern poetry: the hermetic, or the impulse to close off the world and revel in language; and the orphic, or the impulse to allow language to reveal or even to constitute the world as it truly is. These two views of poetry allow Bruns to review twentieth century developments in formalism, structuralist linguistics, and phenomenological theories of language. However, the book is not, as it purports to be, really a history of the development of the orphic and the hermetic, and I thought that for a book about "modern poetry," there was precious little actual poetry analyzed therein, with three full chapters devoted to fiction. Nevertheless, Bruns is obviously brilliant, and the book is worth reading for his accounts of Heidegger and Husserl alone. ( )
  jalbacutler | Jan 10, 2017 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0300016131, Hardcover)

-- Gerald Bruns's ground-breaking analysis compares two contrasting functions of language: the hermetic, where language is self-contained and self-referencing, and the Orphic, which originates from a belief in the mythical unity of word and being. Bruns lucidly depicts the distinctions and convergences between these two lines of thought by examining the works of Mallarme, Flaubert, Joyce, Beckett, and others.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:18:15 -0400)

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