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Money, A Memoir: Women, Emotions, and Cash…
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Money, A Memoir: Women, Emotions, and Cash

by Liz Perle

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The author is the reader for this CDBook (which is rare) and does a great job (likewise uncommon). She comes across as likable and smart, and although her book isn't revolutionary, it's a great overview of the topic. The audio version of this book is abridged, but I still recommend it. Perle has combined her own story with a general study of women and money, both anecdotally and statistically. She shares her personal tales of money management, pitfalls and perceptions through different eras of her life alongside quotes and tales from dozens of women she interviewed. I enjoyed the common denominators she found across different age groups, cultures, and socioeconomic ranges, and the stories I found strangely familiar to my own circumstances or feelings, or often to those of other women in my life. I learned much, and was encouraged to consider my own perceptions of money in terms of needs/wants, general expenditures, simple living and savings. ( )
  csmirl | May 1, 2011 |
I think many more books like this should be written. This one but scratches the surface of many themes, which could be explored more in-depthly in any number of ways. This book isn't entirely the memoir of Perle's own emotional journey with regard to money, though it is that. It's also interspersed with research on money, interviews with various women and research on gender, including the biological differences between the sexes, and how those affect our views on money. I found this to be just too many approaches and paths to fit into this one small memoir. I think it's really important for us -- women, members of North American society -- to talk more about money more than we already to, to open up to each other about our personal finances, and to get past the taboo of discussing these things because there is a lot of shame and fear associated with money and opening up about it can help some of us deal with those feelings. This book contributes to such a discussion and for that it is a success. Perle is very generous with her contribution of opening up about money and her feelings towards it. That's what's successful about the book. What doesn't work as well is presenting far too much material from far too many fields that leaves the impression of an unfinished hodge podge. ( )
  Deesirings | Sep 10, 2008 |
So much about your feelings toward and about money are clearly articulated! Can't put it down, book!
  lbrickhouse | Jan 25, 2008 |
What does this mean? And how do these attitudes affect women's financial health? This is what Liz Perle attempts to figure out in Money, a Memoir. Inspired by her own personal financial experiences, through divorce, working motherhood and overspending, Perle discusses a subject that often is taboo even in the most intimate of friendships.

(Read the full review at Fourth-Rate Reader.) ( )
  Lexicographer | Jan 11, 2007 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 080507712X, Hardcover)

A bold and personal book that digs below the surface of one of society's last taboos--money--and illuminates how women's emotional relationship with it affects every part of their lives

Long ago, and not entirely consciously, Liz Perle made a quiet contract with cash: she would do what it took to get it--work hard, marry right--but she didn't want to have to think about it too much. The subject of money had, since childhood, been quietly sidestepped, a shadowy factor whose private influence was impolite to discuss. This deliberate denial eventually exacted its price, however, when a sudden divorce left Perle with no home, no job, and a four-year-old with a box of toys. She realized she could no longer afford to leave her murky and fraught relationship with money unexamined.

What Perle discovered as she reassembled her life was that almost every woman she knew also subscribed to this strange and emotional code of discretion--even though it laced through their relationships with their parents, lovers, husbands, children, friends, co-workers, and communities. Women who were all too willing to tell each other about their deepest secrets or sexual assets still kept mum when it came to their financial ones.

In Money, A Memoir, Perle attempts to break this silence, adding her own story to the anecdotes and insights of psychologists, researchers, and more than 200 "ordinary" women. It turned out that when money was the topic, most women needed permission to talk. The result is an insightful, unflinching look at the once subtle and commanding influence of money on our every relationship.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 14:20:44 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Long ago, and not entirely consciously, Liz Perle made a quiet contract with cash: she would do what it took to get it--work hard, marry right--but she didn't want to have to think about it too much. This deliberate denial eventually exacted its price, however, when a sudden divorce left Perle with no home, no job, and a four-year-old. She realized she could no longer afford to leave her murky relationship with money unexamined. What she discovered was that almost every woman she knew also subscribed to this code of discretion--even though it laced through their relationships with their parents, lovers, husbands, children, friends, co-workers, and communities. Women who were all too willing to tell each other about their deepest secrets or sexual assets still kept mum when it came to their financial ones. In this book, Perle attempts to break this silence.--From publisher description.… (more)

» see all 2 descriptions

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