HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Brief History of the Dead by Kevin…
Loading...

The Brief History of the Dead

by Kevin Brockmeier

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
2,2031552,946 (3.62)1 / 187
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

English (154)  Dutch (1)  All (155)
Showing 1-5 of 154 (next | show all)
This started with such promise: I loved the premise and the first few chapters. The episodes in the real world, where the Antarctic researcher lives on in a nearly empty world, didn't work as well for me, I found the purgatory where the dead remain until the last living person who remembers them dies far more fascinating. And, as the book wore on and Laura, the living scientist, kept marching on I just lost interest in her march towards some other outpost on the bottom of the world, and the purgatory scenes just felt more like a waiting room for the next scene with Laura. ( )
  mhanlon | Jun 10, 2017 |
Really one of the best books I've read this year, if not ever. Creative, humble, heart-warming and haunting. Definitely will recommend this book. ( )
  poutmouthomaha | May 18, 2017 |
This is a well-written book that kept me turning the pages. The story is told in alternating chapters. One series is told from the pov of Laura, a researcher at an Antarctica research station (funded by Coca Cola). When the station loses contact with the outside world, and supplies become severely diminished, the other two scientists at the station, set off for help from another station several days away. When they fail to return, Laura sets off after them.

The alternating chapters are set in a way-station where people go after they die. "Life" there is pleasant, and people can choose to do what they did before they die--one man publishes a daily newspaper, as he did before his death--or they can choose to do something entirely different--even marry someone other than the spouse they were married to in life. New people arrive and others quietly disappear, although those who remain seem to take little notice of these events. Then, suddenly, hordes of new people begin arriving, and hordes likewise disappearing.

This is not a book that raises big issues, but it is interesting speculative fiction. I can recommend it for a few evenings' enjoyment.

(P.S. Based on some of the plot developments, I wonder I Coke considered at least contacting the publisher). ( )
  arubabookwoman | May 16, 2017 |
I am not sure how to rate this book. It was a very different and fascinating read. One that I think I will need to process and read again before I can truly review it. I would recommend it though. Seriously fascinating, just cannot articulate why at this point.
  nhalliwell | Nov 13, 2016 |
I really wish I could give .5 stars, because I'd like to give this book 3.5 stars. One of my favorite reads in 2007. A lovely idea, well executed. I always looked forward to picking it up. ( )
  mkunruh | Nov 13, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 154 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Many African societies divide humans into three categories: those still alive on earth, the sasha, and the zamani. The recently departed whose time on earth overlapped with people still here are the sasha, the living-dead. They are not wholly dead for they still live in the memories of the living who can call them to mind, create their likeness in art, and bring them to life in anecdote. When the last person to know an ancestor dies, that ancestor leaves the sasha for the zamani, the dead. As generalized ancestors, the zamani are not forgotten but revered. Many ... can be recalled by name. But they are not the living dead. There is a difference.

-- James Loewen, Lies My Teacher Told Me
Dedication
For My Dad
First words
When the blind man arrived in the city, he claimed that he had traveled across a desert of living sand.
Quotations
There was a flaw at the heart of their discussion, the blind man realized. They were mistaking the spirit for the soul. Many people tended to use the words casually, interchangeably, as though there was no difference at all between them, but the spirit and the soul were not the same thing. The body was the material component of a person. The soul was the nonmaterial component. The spirit was simply the connecting line.
Not forever, but long enough.
. . . orchardlike rows of the box springs . . .
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (3)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0375423699, Hardcover)

“Remember me when I’m gone”
just took on a whole new meaning.

The City is inhabited by the recently departed, who reside there only as long as they remain in the memories of the living. Among the current residents of this afterlife are Luka Sims, who prints the only newspaper in the City, with news from the other side; Coleman Kinzler, a vagrant who speaks the cautionary words of God; and Marion and Phillip Byrd, who find themselves falling in love again after decades of marriage.

On Earth, Laura Byrd is trapped by extreme weather in an Antarctic research station. She’s alone and unable to contact the outside world: her radio is down and the power is failing. She’s running out of supplies as quickly as she’s running out of time.

Kevin Brockmeier interweaves these two stories in a spellbinding tale of human connections across boundaries of all kinds. The Brief History of the Dead is the work of a remarkably gifted writer.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:08:51 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

The City is inhabited by the recently departed, who reside there only as long as they remain in the memories of the living. Among the current residents of this afterlife are Luka Sims, who prints the only newspaper in the City, with news from the other side; Coleman Kinzler, a vagrant who speaks the cautionary words of God; and Marion and Phillip Byrd, who find themselves falling in love again after decades of marriage. On Earth, Laura Byrd is trapped by extreme weather in an Antarctic research station. She's alone and unable to contact the outside world: her radio is down and the power is failing. She's running out of supplies as quickly as she's running out of time. Kevin Brockmeier interweaves these two stories in a spellbinding tale of human connections across boundaries of all kinds. The Brief History of the Dead is the work of a remarkably gifted writer. --publisher's description.… (more)

» see all 7 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
4 avail.
164 wanted
1 pay1 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.62)
0.5 2
1 16
1.5 6
2 52
2.5 20
3 175
3.5 66
4 272
4.5 40
5 108

Recorded Books

An edition of this book was published by Recorded Books.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 120,745,976 books! | Top bar: Always visible