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Attica by Garry Kilworth
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Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
Received an audiobook copy of Attica for review from Downpour.com via Audiobook Jukebox

Attica was brilliantly narrated by Simon Vance. This was the first title that I have listened to by this narrator which is surprising since he has narrated over 700 popular novels such as The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo. After listening to his outstanding narration of Attica, I will be searching out more titles read by Vance. I would say that Vance's performance of this audio was contributed significantly to my enjoyment and brought life to even the dullest moments of the story.

Attica introduces the reader to 3 siblings who find themselves on a quest to find a missing object in what they believe is an average old attic but find themselves exploring an ever expanding world of bizarre creatures & dangerous adventure. I found the story to be reminiscent of the dark & whimsical style of Neil Gaiman but lacking his crucial ability to build a connection between reader and characters. This also read a lot like Narnia without the intensity and religious overtones.

Middle grade readers will likely enjoy the strange creatures introduced,the sense of adventure, and the relationship between the kids. Older readers should enjoy reminiscing about the excitement of exploring an old attic and imagining all the hazards that may be lurking there and the treasure that may be waiting to be found.

Ultimately, this was an enjoyable read that I would recommend for fans of whimsical middle grade fantasy. I would urge anyone considering reading Attica to listen to the audio. The fabulous narration by Vance adds personality and atmosphere to this story that distracts from any flaws in the plot or writing. ( )
  ahappybooker | Feb 7, 2014 |
Received an audiobook copy of Attica for review from Downpour.com via Audiobook Jukebox

Attica was brilliantly narrated by Simon Vance. This was the first title that I have listened to by this narrator which is surprising since he has narrated over 700 popular novels such as The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo. After listening to his outstanding narration of Attica, I will be searching out more titles read by Vance. I would say that Vance's performance of this audio was contributed significantly to my enjoyment and brought life to even the dullest moments of the story.

Attica introduces the reader to 3 siblings who find themselves on a quest to find a missing object in what they believe is an average old attic but find themselves exploring an ever expanding world of bizarre creatures & dangerous adventure. I found the story to be reminiscent of the dark & whimsical style of Neil Gaiman but lacking his crucial ability to build a connection between reader and characters. This also read a lot like Narnia without the intensity and religious overtones.

Middle grade readers will likely enjoy the strange creatures introduced,the sense of adventure, and the relationship between the kids. Older readers should enjoy reminiscing about the excitement of exploring an old attic and imagining all the hazards that may be lurking there and the treasure that may be waiting to be found.

Ultimately, this was an enjoyable read that I would recommend for fans of whimsical middle grade fantasy. I would urge anyone considering reading Attica to listen to the audio. The fabulous narration by Vance adds personality and atmosphere to this story that distracts from any flaws in the plot or writing. ( )
  ahappybooker | Feb 7, 2014 |
Attica has a special place in my stony heart because it was one of the books that kick-started regular reading for me in my early adult years. I came upon this book unexpectedly in the time before blogging and it has now become one of my absolute favourite books in the Narnian theme – that is, travel to another world through some sort of household orifice…in this case through the attic of a terraced house. I’m not a die-hard fan of Garry Kilworth by any means, but this is a deeply engaging read that is perfect for independent readers in the pre-teen/early teen age bracket.

More at http://thebookshelfgargoyle.wordpress.com/2013/06/04/top-ten-tuesday-books-that-... ( )
  BruceGargoyle | Oct 20, 2013 |
Received an audiobook copy of Attica for review from Downpour.com via Audiobook Jukebox

Attica was brilliantly narrated by Simon Vance. This was the first title that I have listened to by this narrator which is surprising since he has narrated over 700 popular novels such as The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo. After listening to his outstanding narration of Attica, I will be searching out more titles read by Vance. I would say that Vance's performance of this audio was contributed significantly to my enjoyment and brought life to even the dullest moments of the story.

Attica introduces the reader to 3 siblings who find themselves on a quest to find a missing object in what they believe is an average old attic but find themselves exploring an ever expanding world of bizarre creatures & dangerous adventure. I found the story to be reminiscent of the dark & whimsical style of Neil Gaiman but lacking his crucial ability to build a connection between reader and characters. This also read a lot like Narnia without the intensity and religious overtones.

Middle grade readers will likely enjoy the strange creatures introduced,the sense of adventure, and the relationship between the kids. Older readers should enjoy reminiscing about the excitement of exploring an old attic and imagining all the hazards that may be lurking there and the treasure that may be waiting to be found.

Ultimately, this was an enjoyable read that I would recommend for fans of whimsical middle grade fantasy. I would urge anyone considering reading Attica to listen to the audio. The fabulous narration by Vance adds personality and atmosphere to this story that distracts from any flaws in the plot or writing. ( )
  a.happy.booker | Sep 24, 2013 |
Just like valuable antiques or meaningful mementos found buried amid junk in your attic, Attica is a rare treasure in an unassuming package, the kind you pick up without expectations and are blown away by. Seriously, I love this book, and what shocks me the most is how invisible it is. The Amazon record is dismal in its lack of reviews and the site I order books from for my library has barely any copies available. I think this is one of those British imports that snuck under the radar of Americans, and I hope reviewing it will get it a little more notice.

Step-siblings Jordy, Chloe, and Alex move into a duplex they share with their crotchety landlord. He sends them into the attic in search of a lost pocket watch ÛÒ one that means a lot to him ‰ÛÒ and that‰Ûªs where the adventure begins. One moment they are in their normal attic, searching through piles of dusty junk, but as they move further into the space, they begin to notice strange things. No matter how long they walk, the attic never ends. The walls to either side are no longer visible. Worse, they begin to feel that they are being followed. Soon, they are stumbling across villages of wardrobes and washtubs inhabited by strange, pale people who grow their own food with hydroponics, and they traverse all manner of terrain, including forests of coat racks, hills of typewriters, plains of empty floor boards, and a lake that is the largest water tank ever. They also run into all manner of creatures. Some are humans who abandoned their normal lives for the lure of Attica and became bortrekkers, adventurers and explorers, or board combers, treasure hunters who are obsessed with collecting one particular item. Some creatures are man-made objects that, after being mistreated by humans in the normal world, have developed malevolent personalities, like the mannequins who dress up their human prey in humiliating garments and mock them before killing them. Their search for the pocket watch becomes a search for the way home, but by the time they find it, one of them may not want to return.

There‰Ûªs only one other library review source that seems to have reviewed this book, and it is not nearly as glowing as the review I wrote. In fact, it‰Ûªs not even all that positive. (Oh well ‰ÛÒ that‰Ûªs the problem with reviewing and reviewers in general. We don‰Ûªt always agree. Maybe that‰Ûªs also a strength, because it shows how varied readers can be in their likes and dislikes.) While I do agree with this other reviewer that the children accept their surroundings and survive in Attica too easily, that doesn‰Ûªt take away from my enjoyment of the story. And besides, the kids are plopped into this whole other world where they must adapt quickly, because there‰Ûªs nothing gained by refusing to accept what‰Ûªs right in front of you, especially when that will get you killed; the book would be tremendously boring if they spent the first 50 pages keening piteously about their fate or something. I focused on the sheer originality of the setting (seriously, I only wish I was this creative) and the realistic family dynamics between the three kids. Each one has different temperaments and interests and each reacts and adapts to Attica in their own way, learning necessary skills that they can share with the others. Alex's development in particular was well-done; he's always felt like an outsider, but in Attica, he's happy: he learns to rely on himself, and he feels like he belongs, so much so that he almost becomes first a board comber, then a bortrekker. I also found the pacing quite fast ‰ÛÒ I raced right through the book, eager to see what weird thing they were going to come upon next and what was going to happen.

It's a pity that this is such an invisible title, because I can't see it doing well without some hand selling by librarians and book store employees, but I also can't see kids not loving it when they pick it up. ( )
  Crowinator | Sep 23, 2013 |
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Jordy, Chloe and Alex have moved to a new house in a new town. They seem perfectly ordinary, verging on the dull, but their new landlord, Mr. Grantham, has a spectacular secret.

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