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The Maze Runner (Book 1) by James Dashner

The Maze Runner (Book 1) (original 2009; edition 2010)

by James Dashner

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
7,271580490 (3.82)1 / 318
Title:The Maze Runner (Book 1)
Authors:James Dashner
Info:Delacorte Press (2010), Edition: Reprint, Paperback, 400 pages
Collections:Your library
Tags:Futuristic-fiction; Dystopia; YA

Work details

The Maze Runner by James Dashner (2009)

  1. 430
    The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins (smammers)
  2. 220
    Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card (aeleone)
    aeleone: More sci-fi than Maze Runner, but the characters experience a similar situation as the boys in the maze. Plus, it's super classic.
  3. 122
    Lord of the Flies by William Golding (bookworm12)
  4. 80
    Gone by Michael Grant (stephxsu)
    stephxsu: Incredible world-building and suspense-building featuring a plethora of interesting and sympathetic characters.
  5. 40
    Incarceron by Catherine Fisher (bluenotebookonline)
    bluenotebookonline: Bit more fantasy than The Maze Runner, but a similar setup (hero who's trapped) and pace.
  6. 30
    Wool by Hugh Howey (KatyBee)
  7. 42
    Insurgent by Veronica Roth (Waterbuggg)
    Waterbuggg: Both books are action-packed and have a similar premise and secret.
  8. 00
    Das Labyrinth erwacht by Rainer Wekwerth (Friederike.Geissler)
  9. 00
    House of Stairs by William Sleator (gaialover)
  10. 00
    The Chocolate War by Robert Cormier (Anonymous user)
  11. 00
    The Gardener by S.A. Bodeen (kaledrina)
  12. 22
    Ship Breaker by Paolo Bacigalupi (bluenotebookonline)
    bluenotebookonline: Also action packed, has a dystopian setting, includes quite a bit of kids vs. adults, etc. Prinz award winner.

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English (572)  Spanish (4)  German (1)  Catalan (1)  Dutch (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (580)
Showing 1-5 of 572 (next | show all)
This book started interesting me, of course, when the movie came out. I usually staunchly refuse to see any book-based movies before I read the book, but my parents broke me down when they marketed going to the movies as a “family event,” so I didn’t get to reading it beforehand, which meant it got pushed way down my to-read list. When the Pokemon Go challenge came up and had a hyped-up book category, I decided to finally get this off my to-read list and see how the book compared to its film version.

My first reaction is that it’s different in surprising ways. I won’t ruin it for people who have yet to read it, but the problem the way they solve the maze in the novel is a bit more complex and the ending is just the littlest bit different. The characters also had a bit of a different flavor to them, but I think that’s true for anything when your imagination is supplying interpretations rather than an actor. The one character whose introduction and personality is remarkably different is Teresa, which I thought pretty interesting. In the movie, she’s fierce to the point of being rabid when she’s introduced — in the movie, she’s calm and very rarely loses her temper. I’m not sure what this says about cinema portrayal of females or the people who adapted the book for the film, but it’s an interesting difference.

Regardless of the changes, I feel the same way about this book as I do about the movie: It’s fine. I don’t hate it, I don’t love it, and the plot is mostly interesting, though I hope future books provide a lot more growth and development from the characters. The way things were set up in this first book, it was mostly about discovering who they were themselves, so they remained mostly stagnant throughout. Without having read the sequels, it’s not something I can firmly recommend, but I am looking forward to reading the sequels — hopefully they deliver.

Originally posted on Going on to the Next. ( )
  sedelia | Sep 30, 2016 |
This reminded me of the Hunger Games except it takes place in a maze that’s surrounded by a stone wall. Hunger Games is exponentially better than The Maze Runner. I was drawn to this novel due to the popularity and because I can’t watch the movie until I read the book.

I liked The Maze Runner, but I just didn’t love it. The story was interesting and the narrator on the audiobook kept my attention, but the overall writing was just OK.

The beginning was a bit confusing, so it took me a moment to get my bearings. I didn’t like how the story began because there wasn’t enough background to help set the stage for the readers. The protagonist, Thomas, kept asking a lot of questions at the beginning, but the only response he got from the other kids was that he had a lot to learn. I’m guessing James Dashner was trying to build suspense by creating a mystery, but I just didn’t find his execution appealing.

The characters were interesting, but they lacked depth. There was only one girl in the maze, which I didn’t understand. I felt absolutely nothing in some scenes that were supposed to be very emotional. It just felt very detached to me.

I had no idea how this novel was going to end or why they were in the maze in the first place. Obviously, you find out at the end, but I didn’t see any clues throughout the novel.

I’m not sure if I would recommend this novel or if I liked it enough to continue the series. It’s not terrible, just middle of the road. I could have given it two stars, but the story was intriguing enough that I bumped it up a star. I can find hundreds of books that I would rather read than the next book in this series.
( )
  JennysBookBag.com | Sep 28, 2016 |
Very much teenage fiction, but an enjoyable read nevertheless. There is nothing really new here (sort of Divergent meets The Hunger Games), but that doesn't really matter as it isn't completely predictable. I'd recommend it for fans of authors such as John Christopher. ( )
  nebula21 | Sep 14, 2016 |
Wow is this a slow starter. Thomas shows up in a strange place called The Glade full of boys who won't tell him things. The first several chapters are mostly Thomas asking questions and getting frustrated when no one will answer him. It's pretty tedious. It gets a bit better as time goes on, and while it doesn't really hold up well on its own (too many unanswered questions, and the questions that do get answered are a tad too obvious), it might turn out to be a good trilogy. I generally like YA dystopia stories, after all. ( )
  melydia | Sep 8, 2016 |
So much more involved than the movie. Movie was good, but this book had way more adventure and plot twists!! ( )
  MrNattania | Sep 5, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 572 (next | show all)
The story reads like a maze with erroneous turns, dead ends, and a plot that should work but falls short.
added by Katya0133 | editLibrary Media Connection, Constance G. Pappas (Nov 1, 2009)
James Dashner has created a thrilling dystopian novel.
The Maze Runner has a great hook, and fans of dystopian literature, particularly older fans of Jeanne DuPrau's The City of Ember (Random, 2003), will likely enjoy this title and ask for the inevitable sequel.
added by Katya0133 | editSchool Library Journal, Kristin Anderson (Oct 1, 2009)
With a fast-paced narrative steadily answering the myriad questions that arise and an ever-increasing air of tension, Dashner's suspenseful adventure will keep readers guessing until the very end.
added by Katya0133 | editPublishers Weekly (Sep 21, 2009)

» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
James Dashnerprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Deakins, MarkReadersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Straub, PhilipCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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For Lynette. This book was a three-year journey,
and you never doubted.
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He began his new life standing up, surrounded by cold darkness and stale, dusty air.
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Haiku summary
Teen must run through maze
To figure out his past and
Survive scary plot.

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0385737955, Paperback)

The first book in the New York Times bestselling Maze Runner series—The Maze Runner is a modern classic, perfect for fans of The Hunger Games and Divergent.

When Thomas wakes up in the lift, the only thing he can remember is his first name. His memory is blank. But he’s not alone. When the lift’s doors open, Thomas finds himself surrounded by kids who welcome him to the Glade—a large, open expanse surrounded by stone walls.

Just like Thomas, the Gladers don’t know why or how they got to the Glade. All they know is that every morning the stone doors to the maze that surrounds them have opened. Every night they’ve closed tight. And every thirty days a new boy has been delivered in the lift.

Thomas was expected. But the next day, a girl is sent up—the first girl to ever arrive in the Glade. And more surprising yet is the message she delivers.

Thomas might be more important than he could ever guess. If only he could unlock the dark secrets buried within his mind.

From the Hardcover edition.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:20:02 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

Sixteen-year-old Thomas wakes up with no memory in the middle of a maze and realizes he must work with the community in which he finds himself if he is to escape.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 3 descriptions

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James Dashner is a LibraryThing Author, an author who lists their personal library on LibraryThing.

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Average: (3.82)
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1 37
1.5 11
2 132
2.5 33
3 527
3.5 134
4 786
4.5 104
5 584


3 editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

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