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Take Two by Karen Kingsbury
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Take Two (2009)

by Karen Kingsbury

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I used to enjoy reading Karen Kingsbury's books, but right now, I kind of feel like she's written the Bloomington, IN group to death and is now flogging them. I don't enjoy them much anymore.

Andi Ellison doesn't seem to have learned anything from her previous experiences. She still seems to think she missed out on something growing up with such "strict parents" and she wants to experience life--never mind that trying to experience life almost got her raped in the past. She also wants the fame of being a movie star without putting in the work and the time. She seems to feel that she should get a shortcut because her father is in the process of becoming a movie producer--that he should give her roles--and when he wants her to wait, she figures she'll get the roles elsewhere. She uses this to rationalize a lot of her poor choices. She's flattered to be asked to star in a student film (and who wouldn't be) and she rationalizes her choice of partial nudity by saying things like "it wouldn't be any worse than being filmed wearing a bathing suit" or "it's true to the artistic process".

From the start, I wondered about this student film. I thought that Taz (the student film maker) had heard about Andi's fraternity incident and was going to use this film to exact a sort of revenge on her since she was able to escape being raped.

I understand Andi's disappointment that Cody Coleman didn't want more of a relationship with her, but instead of getting more involved with church or Cru or even theater where she might meet a nice guy with a similar belief system, she chooses Taz.

Bailey Flanigan doesn't seem to try to understand her roommate Andi's draw to this. She just pronounces "you're not going to do it". I think there are some off-writing attempts for Bailey to talk to Andi but it sounds like Andi thinks Bailey is a stick-in-the-mud and that Bailey talks everything to death. So rather than having a dialogue, it seems like the two just go their separate ways.

I was kind of surprised that Bailey's family took Tim along to New York with them when they visited and paid for him to go to so many Broadway shows. It seems like if Bailey really wanted to reach out to Andi she could have seen if her family would have included Andi in the trip.

Bailey's going out with Tim Reed, but she also keeps thinking about Cody. I do agree with Bailey's attempts to not bad-mouth Tim to Cody or to discuss the problems in their relationship with him (especially not before discussing them with Tim). It seems Bailey is starting to change her mind about what she wants out of life. Tim wants to go to New York City and seems enchanted by everything he sees in their visit there, but for Bailey, the city has lost some of it's allure.

Cody seems to avoid dealing with issues rather than confront them.

In the first book of this series, I thought that Tim might decide to date Andi though that never materialized. I still wonder if it might happen since both Tim and Andi seem to have goals of being in the entertainment industry moreso than Bailey seems to late in the book.

Meanwhile, Andi's dad Keith and his friend Chase Ryan are trying to edit their first film and get it into theaters rather than direct to DVD. This takes them away from their homes often. Keith and his wife's children seem to be older where Chase and Kelly's girls are young. I'm sure it is difficult for Kelly to raise the girls and keep the house mostly by herself, but Kelly seems to expect Chase to read her mind to know what she needs and wants rather than communicating to him how she's feeling and what she needs. Kelly's also turning to food rather than to God to cope with her problems. Keith and his wife seem to communicate better with each other.

However, both Keith and Chase seem to feel that their "mission from God movie producing career" comes first (well maybe second behind God)--even before their families. I was especially disappointed that Chase chose to stay in L.A. because he had meetings related to the movie even while his daughter was having surgery. Does he not trust Keith and/or Luke to take the meetings and make the deals? Certainly Keith and Luke would understand him saying "I have to leave for home due to a family emergency" even if the Hollywood-types didn't. I also didn't like the implied love triangle between Kendall-Chase-Kelly where Chase is drawn to Kendall because of her confidence and her support of their career. Though truthfully, I can't imagine Kendall making a play for Chase when she knows he's married--her character doesn't seem like it would allow that. ( )
  JenniferRobb | Feb 7, 2019 |
A desperate temptation, a driven determination an undying dreams.

Above the Line Series Book II
  Indiancreek | Dec 13, 2017 |
Not as preachy as most of Kingsbury's novels and an actual cliff-hanger to make you want to read the next in the series. A step up from her usual. ( )
  olegalCA | Dec 9, 2014 |
TAKE TWO (Above the Line Series, Book 2). Kingsbury, Karen. 316p, paper, Zondervan 2009, 9780310266174, $14.99 [FIC]
NCLA Review - Take Two is the second in a four book series. It follows two filmmakers who left the mission field in Indonesia with a dream. They wished to go to Hollywood to make a film containing a dynamic message that would change the world. But what is the cost in family relationships due to the hard life of film making? And what kind of energy does one need to take on the movie industry? While the plot is admirable, this reader was left dangling. Nothing was concluded and there was little reader satisfaction. This is apparently because two other books in this series are due out this year. Fewer books in a series with a more complete message would be welcomed. Rating: 2—JD ( )
  ncla | Jul 3, 2010 |
I saw this book as a bridge to the next one. I thought each book would be about making another movie, but they only let out the last one and didn't even get to start on the next one. There were some good outcomes with Cody and Bailey making up as friends and Kelly starting to turn her life around at a women's conference. ( )
  eliorajoy | May 29, 2010 |
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Kendall Adams sat across from her father in the executive boardroom of his Los Angeles high-rise and stared at the rolling hills of Hollywood in the distance.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0310266173, Paperback)

Filmmakers Chase Ryan and Keith Ellison have completed their first feature film, and Hollywood is buzzing with the news. In the wake of that excitement, the producers acquire rights to a novel that has all the ingredients they want for their next project. At the same time they cross paths with a well-connected player who introduces them to the right people, and suddenly every studio in town wants to talk to Chase and Keith. The producers' dreams are on the verge of coming true, but Chase's marriage is strained and Keith's daughter --- Andi Ellison --- is making questionable choices in her quest for stardom. The producers are gaining respect and are on the verge of truly changing culture through the power of film --- but is the change worth the cost?

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:15:48 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Filmmakers Chase Ryan and Keith Ellison have completed their first feature film, and Hollywood is buzzing with the news. In the wake of that excitement, the producers acquire rights to a novel that has all the ingredients they want for their next project. At the same time they cross paths with a well-connected player who introduces them to the right people, and suddenly every studio in town wants to talk to Chase and Keith. The producers' dreams are on the verge of coming true, but Chase's marriage is strained and Keith's daughter - Andi Ellison - is making questionable choices in her quest for stardom. The producers are gaining respect and are on the verge of truly changing culture through the power of film - but is the change worth the cost? - Publisher.… (more)

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Zondervan

2 editions of this book were published by Zondervan.

Editions: 0310318939, 0310266173

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