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The Ladies of Missalonghi by Colleen…
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The Ladies of Missalonghi (original 1987; edition 1991)

by Colleen McCullough

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7052213,430 (3.67)58
Member:pjp19590
Title:The Ladies of Missalonghi
Authors:Colleen McCullough
Info:Arrow (1991), Paperback, 192 pages
Collections:Your library
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The Ladies of Missalonghi by Colleen McCullough (1987)

  1. 10
    The Blue Castle by L. M. Montgomery (MDGentleReader)
    MDGentleReader: Until I reread them both, I actually confused these two stories. I think that if you enjoy one, you'll enjoy the other.
  2. 11
    The Sugar Queen by Sarah Addison Allen (glorymom13)
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English (21)  Spanish (1)  All languages (22)
Showing 1-5 of 21 (next | show all)
Interesting novel @ 3 single ladies how they take control at last

Sometimes fairy tales can come true--even for plain, shy spinsters like Missy Wright. Neither as pretty as cousin Alicia nor as domineering as mother Drusilla, she seems doomed to a quiet life of near poverty at Missalonghi, her family's pitifully small homestead in Australia's Blue Mountains. But it's a brand new century--the twentieth--a time for new thoughts and bold new actions.
  christinejoseph | Dec 29, 2015 |
Took this short novel with me on holidays and it was the perfect choice! A delightful story full of wonderful, typically Australian characters and set in one of my favourite places, The Blue Mountains. Since coming home from holidays I have discovered that it is a book under quite a cloud of controversy. Colleen McCullough has been accused by many for plagiarism of the novel "The Blue Castle" by the author of Anne of Green Gables, L.M. Montgomery. The Blue Castle was published in 1926 and Ladies of Missalonghi in 1987. So I know which book I'm going to read soon, just to see for myself! ( )
  Fliss88 | Dec 6, 2015 |
I liked most of the story, and enjoyed the fairytale-like quality of it. But I couldn't help thinking about the whole plagiarism thing all the time that I was reading it. There were unquestionable similarities between this and [The Blue Castle], although McCullough did take the story in some different directions. For instance: the supernatural element; the outright criminal behaviour of Missy's family; and more emphasis on the theme of women's powerlessness. And there was the rather disturbing point of Missy's basing her marriage on an outright lie. I wish I could have judged the book on its own merits, instead of weighing everything against the original.

I don't know yet whether the matter of Missy's lie will prove to be a deal breaker for me in The Ladies of Missalonghi. I liked the rest of the story a lot, but that was such a fundamental issue. I guess that is one of the differences between Montgomery and McCullough—L. M. Montgomery wanted to leave her readers happy, but McCullough didn't mind leaving them with a touch of uneasiness. ( )
  SylviaC | Nov 24, 2015 |
A delightful story about a shy spinster in an outback town in Australia. The characters are well-defined and the story is a pleasure to read. There is a slight paranormal atmosphere to the happenings now and then in the story, but it all works out in the end.
I've also heard about the suggestion that Ms McCullogh pinched the idea from another story, but quite honestly I don't care. I enjoy her story and have re-read it more than once because it is a 'pick-me-up' in this age of so much violence and sex in most published books. I haven't read the other story and have no interest in getting it, to make comparisons. The Ladies of Missalonghi is good enough for me. I have never heard that the 'other author' (or any of her family members) ever sued Ms McCullough for breaching copyright, and I've never read any kind of denial by Ms McCullogh that the story is a plagiarism either. In the end it's up to each reader to chose which of these 'versions' she reads, and only to offer criticism on that version and leave the courts to sort out the rest. ( )
  dragonflydancing | May 23, 2015 |
Several years into the twentieth century, in the tiny town of Byron nestled somewhere in the Australian Blue Mountains, a shy spinster, her widowed mother and her crippled aunt live in genteel poverty. For thirty-three-year-old Missy Wright, her mother Drusilla and aunt Octavia, life is difficult living as the poor relations of the Hurlingford family - the most prominent family in Byron. Despite the Wrights being allowed to live at Missalonghi - Drusilla's home through marriage - the women are actually victims of the Hurlingford inheritance policy which allows only the male members of the family to inherit all the wealth. In turn, the men heartlessly abuse and dominate the women in their care.

Plain, painfully thin and doomed to dress always in serviceable brown, Missy has limited funds and suffers from periodic bouts of ill health. Her only consolation is her frequent trips to the privately owned lending library in town, where she indulges in her only vice - reading Gothic romance novels. Missy seems resigned to her fate, facing a dreary future until a distant cousin, a divorcée, arrives from Sydney...

I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It was a delightful little story, with a totally unexpected ending, at least for me. I do have a copy of Colleen McCullough's epic saga The Thorn Birds hidden somewhere on my bookshelf, but have never read it. That particular admission probably comes as quite a surprise to many people, but it is the truth: "I have not ever read The Thorn Birds by Colleen McCullough!"

However, reading The Ladies of Missalonghi is my first foray into Ms. McCullough's work, and it was a relatively quick and easy read for me. Engaging and rather quirky, I give The Ladies of Missalonghi by Colleen McCullough an A! ( )
  moonshineandrosefire | Nov 19, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 21 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (8 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Colleen McCulloughprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Kuyper-Snel, Mariëlla deTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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For Mother, who has finally attained her dream of living in the Blue Mountains
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"Can you tell me, Octavia, why our luck never seems to change for the better?"
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0380704587, Mass Market Paperback)

Sometimes fairy toles can come true-even for plain,shy spinsters like Missy Wright. Neither as pretty as cousin Alicianor as domineering as mother Drusilla, she seems doomed to aquiet life of near poverty at Missalonghi, her family's pitifullysmall homestead in Australia's Blue Mountains. But It's a brandnew century-the twentieth-a time for new thoughts and boldnew actions. And Missy Wright is about to set every self-righteous tongue in the town of Byron wagging. Because she hasjust set her sights on a mysterious, mistrusted and unsuspectingstranger ... who just might be Prince-Charming in disguise.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:19:32 -0400)

In Missalonghi, on Missy Wright's family's pitifully small homestead in Australia's Blue Mountains, It's a brand new century--the twentieth--a time for new thoughts and bold new actions. And Missy is about to set every self-righteous tongue in the town of Byron wagging! Sometimes fairy tales can come true-even for plain, shy spinsters like Missy Wright. Neither as pretty as cousin Alicianor as domineering as mother Drusilla, she seems doomed to a quiet life of near poverty at Missalonghi, her family's pitifully small homestead in Australia's Blue Mountains. But It's a brand new century-the twentieth-a time for new thoughts and boldnew actions. And Missy Wright is about to set every self-righteous tongue in the town of Byron wagging. Because she has just set her sights on a mysterious, mistrusted and unsuspectingstranger ... who just might be Prince-Charming in disguise.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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