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Another Faust by Daniel Nayeri
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Another Faust

by Daniel Nayeri, Dina Nayeri

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Another Series (The First)

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3113635,843 (3.24)14

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» See also 14 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 35 (next | show all)
I chose to read this book cause I loved the cover and the title sounded interesting; I love new takes on old tales, whether it's high literature or fairy tales. But this was kind of a strange book. It was easy to get into but I had to take a break in the middle so I could read the new Sookie Stackhouse because of due dates and that made it hard to get back into. Five unhappy children are whisked away from their homes in the middle of the night at the age of ten. They are all given special powers as part of their deals with their governess or in order to entice them into making deals. The powers threw me off a little. Since I had never read Faust I couldn't figure out exactly how the stories were connected, but by the end I think I figured it out. We watch the children go through a year at one of the most prestigious high schools in New York as they try to use their powers to get what they want. In the end the children must each decide for themselves how they want to live their lives.
I found the parts regarding the governesses life at the beginning of each chapter and occasionally tucked into a chapter, very interesting. The authors had her interacting with famous figures and learning how futures can be affected. I also really liked all of the interesting ideas regarding language. While this book is probably not for everyone (the ending is a little ambiguous and I know some people really hate that) if you do choose to read it there is definitely a little be careful what you wish for going on that should have close attention paid to. ( )
  Rosa.Mill | Nov 21, 2015 |
I chose to read this book cause I loved the cover and the title sounded interesting; I love new takes on old tales, whether it's high literature or fairy tales. But this was kind of a strange book. It was easy to get into but I had to take a break in the middle so I could read the new Sookie Stackhouse because of due dates and that made it hard to get back into. Five unhappy children are whisked away from their homes in the middle of the night at the age of ten. They are all given special powers as part of their deals with their governess or in order to entice them into making deals. The powers threw me off a little. Since I had never read Faust I couldn't figure out exactly how the stories were connected, but by the end I think I figured it out. We watch the children go through a year at one of the most prestigious high schools in New York as they try to use their powers to get what they want. In the end the children must each decide for themselves how they want to live their lives.
I found the parts regarding the governesses life at the beginning of each chapter and occasionally tucked into a chapter, very interesting. The authors had her interacting with famous figures and learning how futures can be affected. I also really liked all of the interesting ideas regarding language. While this book is probably not for everyone (the ending is a little ambiguous and I know some people really hate that) if you do choose to read it there is definitely a little be careful what you wish for going on that should have close attention paid to. ( )
  Rosa.Mill | Nov 21, 2015 |
I chose to read this book cause I loved the cover and the title sounded interesting; I love new takes on old tales, whether it's high literature or fairy tales. But this was kind of a strange book. It was easy to get into but I had to take a break in the middle so I could read the new Sookie Stackhouse because of due dates and that made it hard to get back into. Five unhappy children are whisked away from their homes in the middle of the night at the age of ten. They are all given special powers as part of their deals with their governess or in order to entice them into making deals. The powers threw me off a little. Since I had never read Faust I couldn't figure out exactly how the stories were connected, but by the end I think I figured it out. We watch the children go through a year at one of the most prestigious high schools in New York as they try to use their powers to get what they want. In the end the children must each decide for themselves how they want to live their lives.
I found the parts regarding the governesses life at the beginning of each chapter and occasionally tucked into a chapter, very interesting. The authors had her interacting with famous figures and learning how futures can be affected. I also really liked all of the interesting ideas regarding language. While this book is probably not for everyone (the ending is a little ambiguous and I know some people really hate that) if you do choose to read it there is definitely a little be careful what you wish for going on that should have close attention paid to. ( )
  Rosa.Mill | Nov 21, 2015 |
I chose to read this book cause I loved the cover and the title sounded interesting; I love new takes on old tales, whether it's high literature or fairy tales. But this was kind of a strange book. It was easy to get into but I had to take a break in the middle so I could read the new Sookie Stackhouse because of due dates and that made it hard to get back into. Five unhappy children are whisked away from their homes in the middle of the night at the age of ten. They are all given special powers as part of their deals with their governess or in order to entice them into making deals. The powers threw me off a little. Since I had never read Faust I couldn't figure out exactly how the stories were connected, but by the end I think I figured it out. We watch the children go through a year at one of the most prestigious high schools in New York as they try to use their powers to get what they want. In the end the children must each decide for themselves how they want to live their lives.
I found the parts regarding the governesses life at the beginning of each chapter and occasionally tucked into a chapter, very interesting. The authors had her interacting with famous figures and learning how futures can be affected. I also really liked all of the interesting ideas regarding language. While this book is probably not for everyone (the ending is a little ambiguous and I know some people really hate that) if you do choose to read it there is definitely a little be careful what you wish for going on that should have close attention paid to. ( )
  Rosa.Mill | Nov 21, 2015 |
OMG.
So, you all should meet supergeek, the half of me who comes out when Within Temptation, Kamelot, various books, Faust, swimming, and a few other things are mentioned (yes.. yes you read that correctly.. i did say Faust.)
I honestly got this book without completely knowing what it was about. I saw the cover and the title and that was enough to catch my attention because i obviously have a thing for Faust. But, you know, retellings and all can take stories to places that have absolutely nothing to do with what the story used to actually be about.
So, with that said, i can say quite confidently that i enjoyed this more than most 16 year olds ever will. Why? Well besides the fact i have in fact read the play (it started as a snippet for school, but then i read the whole thing on my own time) but this obsession was then heightened to epic proportions by my favorite band, Kamelot. Because they did a loose interpretation of the story in their Epica/The Black Halo albums. (Two concept albums. two. freakin. amazing. concept. albums.) so, as those are two of my favorite albums of all time, you can definitely say the story has rubbed off on me in more ways than one.... heh... because i listen to The Black Halo obsessively... i love Kamelot.... =)
So, that's pretty much the reason i could enjoy this more than the average teenager, because i already knew both the story and a loose interpretation (i definitely think the 2nd one helps because this is a very very loose interpretations. basically just playing on the themes)
But enough of that. TO THE BOOK!!!
I love how all the characters are introduced in the beginning, one by one, showing each ones faults (oh another reason i liked it so much. i love horribly flawed characters) and in each Vileroy makes an unnamed appearance.
So by the time they're fifteen and the book truly starts, you already pretty much know the characters rather well.
Each one was given a 'gift' by Madame Vileroy that they're to use to get what they want, and reach their goals, no matter who gets in the way.
There's Belle & Bice (i can't do that little thing over the e...) Christian, Victoria, and Valentine, each has there own talents whether they be stealing, cheating, lying, hiding... ect. ect.
The dialogue was excellent, i loved the tension between all 5 characters caused by Madame Vileroy. The setting was a little lost at times, sometimes i had no idea where the characters were at exactly. I loved the whole range of characters and of course... the story... =D
Really the only thing i didn't like about the book was when there was a swim meet and it said they were going to swim a 400 meter butterfly. I swim competitively and there's no such thing as a 400 fly... there's a 100 or 200 fly... or a 400 IM... and seriously... 400 METERS??? that's the worst form of torture... (and i'm a butterflyer...) anyway though... the only thing i didn't like was completely irrelevant to the story xD
I would definitely give it 10/10 stars. I really thought it was amazing.
Oh and this line made me totally sqeal;
""I am a friend of Faust," Bice whispered and began translating to herself until she arrived at something. Me Fausto Philos - Mephistopheles."
*squeal* ( )
  glitzandshadows | Oct 12, 2015 |
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» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Nayeri, Danielprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Nayeri, Dinamain authorall editionsconfirmed
Kellgren, KatherineNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Dedication
"So, who do you think we should dedicate it to?"

"I don't know. Let's just get this over with."

"What? What's the problem?"

"Nothing. I just think we should move it along."

"Well, we can't move it along until you say what's wrong."

"There's nothing wrong!"

"You're all pensive."

"What, now you're trying to police my moods?"

"Are you kidding?"

"All right, I've had enough of this. Let's just dedicate it to Oprah and get it over with."

"This is ridiculous. If you're going to be so angry, we can do this later."

"No! let's just do it now."

"Fine! Who do you want to dedicate it to?"

"This is stupid. I'm sick of you dictating everything."

"You're so stupid, sometimes."

"You're stupid."

"Moooom!"

"Moooom!"

This book is dedicated to our mom.
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Victoria didn't have time to play.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0763637076, Hardcover)

A devilish debut by a brother-sister team invites us into the world of the elite Marlowe School, where some gifted students are having a hell of a year.

One night, in cities all across Europe, five children vanish — only to appear, years later, at an exclusive New York party with a strange and elegant governess. Rumor and mystery follow the Faust teenagers to the city’s most prestigious high school, where they soar to suspicious heights with the help of their benefactor’s extraordinary "gifts." But as the students claw their way up — reading minds, erasing scenes, stopping time, stealing power, seducing with artificial beauty — they start to suffer the sideeffects of their own addictions. And as they make further deals with the devil, they uncover secrets more shocking than their most unforgivable sins. At once chilling and wickedly satirical, this contemporary reimagining of the Faustian bargain is a compelling tale of ambition, consequences, and ultimate redemption.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:20:49 -0400)

"On a single night, five children suddenly vanish from their homes in Paris, Glasgow, Rome, and London. Years later, five enigmatic teenagers make an impressive entrance at an exclusive New York holiday party with their strange but beautiful governess, Madam Vileroy. Rumor and intrigue follow the Faust children to the elite Manhattan Marlowe School, where their very presence brings unexplainable misfortune..."--dust cover flap.… (more)

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