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These Foolish Things by Deborah Moggach
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These Foolish Things (2004)

by Deborah Moggach

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4473723,394 (3.52)40
  1. 00
    At the Jerusalem by Paul Bailey (KayCliff)
    KayCliff: Both novels are set in old people's homes.
  2. 00
    Quartet in Autumn by Barbara Pym (KayCliff)
    KayCliff: Both novels present the problems of old age.
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Showing 1-5 of 36 (next | show all)
Loved this book...a fun, easy read that also made me think a bit about the challenges of aging. Can't wait for the movie! ( )
  ArleenWilliams | Jul 22, 2014 |
This book was originally published with the title, 'These Foolish Things', which after having read the book, I think that would have been a more apropos title, albeit, not quite as exotic.

The plot had promise, the gist being of a retirement home ('hotel') being set up in Bangalore, India for old folks in England to retire to. The first part of the book told their individual stories, as to why they were leaving their homeland for another clime. I looked forward to the rest of the book where their paths and lives converged on a foreign shore.

However, the author continued largely with their individual stories and of their adaptation 'issues' -- which was perhaps the original premise of the novel -- drawing on each character's idiosyncrasies. The problem, for me, was that I felt the ending was too abrupt, a too hasty attempt to tie up loose ends, which didn't match the pace of the rest of the novel, hence the low rating. I have not yet watched the movie, and am interested in making comparisons. ( )
  MomsterBookworm | Jul 14, 2014 |
When Ravi Kapoors an overworked doctor in a London hospital. The health care system is going broke and they are understaffed. His Father in law once again comes to live with him and his wife after getting kicked out of another nursing home. He asks his wife can,t we just send him away far far away. His prayers are answered when his entrepreneurial cousin decides to set up a retirement home in India, hoping to re-create in Bangalore an Elegant lost corner of England. The Marigold was many things in its day from a school to a hotel, now its a retirement hotel. Several retirees are enticed by the brochures which promise indulgent living at a bargain price, but once they get there they find the restoration of the once sophisticated Hotel are stalled and that such amenities as water and electricity are....infreguent. But they come to find its plentiful in adventure, stunning beauty and love. The author really draws you into the characters lives and problems . From the couple with the gay son, to the mum who finds out her son was into some shady business and now is on the run from the police.The decriptions of Bangalore and the surrounding area made me feel as if i was there seeing the bazaars , poor street children the beggars and merchants.I would diffently read more books by this author. Once i started reading it i did,t want to put the book down.(less) [edit]
Jan 18, 2012 [edit]
Jan 06, 2012
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  Georgiann | Apr 8, 2014 |
A group of disparate souls who create a new family with one another. I will be interested in seeing the movie. The author pulls no punches when describing the beauty and the sorrows of India as wll as facing the "golden years". ( )
  FAR2MANYBOOKS | Apr 5, 2014 |
Fun read. It's fiction and has some 'holes' that could be called weak spots - - but what the heck - it has lots of human interest, children's reactions to elderly parents, and elder realities of elderness. All that elder-said, it's still a fun book with lots of unique characters.
Then the setting of somewhat 'cast-off' Brits in the country of castes in the cast off British empire and with the CAST of actors in the movie . . .
The books seems to be just the tip of an iceberg of further plots and explorations.
I'm ready to read more.
I thought each of the characters had so much more room to be developed and expanded that this could be a series of books - like Alexander McCall Smith does - or made into a TV series.
Chose it because I want to see the movie (hopefully soon) and I enjoy reading the book first.
With that marvelous cast of characters - seems the movie has gotten great reviews and with that cast - could imagine this as the basis for a Masterpiece Theatre "At the Marigold"
Go ahead - read it! ( )
  CasaBooks | Mar 14, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 36 (next | show all)
To be honest, I’d never heard of The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (or even These Foolish Things as it was originally titled) until Judi Dench, Bill Nighy, Maggie Smith and a whole host of other famous faces made it a big screen success. Of course, with a cast like that failure isn’t really an option, but would the book live up to my high expectations after belly laughing my way through the movie?

The good news is the paper version is sufficiently different to the screenplay that you don’t feel like they’re reinventing the wheel. But the basis of the story is the same; a group of seventy-somethings who up sticks and leave the UK to spend their twilight years at the ultimate retirement home – the Best Exotic Marigold Hotel in Bangalore, Southern India. This overseas retreat might not quite live up to the OAP oasis its guests expect; but as their tales unfold and begin to intertwine, they each discover a very individual affection for their new found home and the people they encounter there.

Take Norman Purse, the very definition of a dirty old man. Thrown out of countless residential homes for inappropriate behaviour he is the inspiration behind the Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, set up by his long suffering son in law Ravi and Ravi’s cousin Sonny. Then there’s Evelyn Greenslade, a rather timid widow who has barely made a decision in her life – until now that is. Dotty Dorothy Miller, who was born and brought up in India, and Jean and Douglas Ainslie, a ‘happily’ married couple who thrive on adventure. Last but by no means least, Muriel Donnelly; one of the Marigold’s most unlikely residents. Her aversion to ‘darkies’ isn’t quite as deep routed as her conviction that India will lead her to Keith - the prodigal son, on the run after some dodgy dealings went wrong.

Add a few more eccentric characters to the mix, a pinch of sadness, a good helping of humour and a love interest or two and hey presto –you‘ve got yourself a winner.
added by VivienneR | editSavista Magazine, Georgina Crawshaw (Jan 26, 2013)
 
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This one is for Simon Booker
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Muriel Donnelly, an old girl in her seventies, was left in a hospital cubicle for forty-eight hours.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0812982428, Paperback)

Now a major motion picture starring Judi Dench, Maggie Smith, Tom Wilkinson, Billy Nighy, and Dev Patel
 
When Ravi Kapoor, an overworked London doctor, reaches the breaking point with his difficult father-in-law, he asks his wife: “Can’t we just send him away somewhere? Somewhere far, far away.” His prayer is seemingly answered when Ravi’s entrepreneurial cousin sets up a retirement home in India, hoping to re-create in Bangalore an elegant lost corner of England. Several retirees are enticed by the promise of indulgent living at a bargain price, but upon arriving, they are dismayed to find that restoration of the once sophisiticated hotel has stalled, and that such amenities as water and electricity are . . . infrequent. But what their new life lacks in luxury, they come to find, it’s plentiful in adventure, stunning beauty, and unexpected love.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:52:21 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

When Dr. Ravi Kapoor's cousin sets up a retirement home in India, Ravi's father-in-law is one of its first guests, but what the renovation lacks in promised amenities and luxury, it makes up for in adventure, stunning beauty, and unexpected love.

» see all 5 descriptions

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