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Swamp Thing, Vol. 1: Saga of the Swamp Thing…
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Swamp Thing, Vol. 1: Saga of the Swamp Thing (1987)

by Alan Moore (Writer), Steve R. Bissette (Illustrator)

Other authors: John Costanza (Letterer), John Totleben (Inker), Tatjana Wood (Colorist)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Swamp Thing (Vol.2 1)

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English (16)  Finnish (1)  All languages (17)
Showing 1-5 of 16 (next | show all)
I really enjoyed this one. I'm not one to read a lot of superhero comics because I generally find them to be a little too formulaic. This certainly had it's moments, but overall strayed from what I would consider standard fare. The page layouts were astounding as were the illustrations. I spent a lot of time exploring each panel, and that made for a really captivating read. Certainly this isn't the masterpiece that V for Vendetta was or Watchmen, but I wasn't really expecting or looking for that. I will probably pick up more of these volumes in the future. ( )
  jakegest | Dec 24, 2013 |
Saga of a Swamp Thing was originally a series created by Len Wein and Berni Wrightson.

Alan Moore begins this series with illustrators Steve Vissette and John Totleben. It begins AFTER the swamp thing is created, more precisely after the death of Alec Holland. As per this series, the swamp thing is *not* human, rather still has personality of Alec Holland. The back story has been dispensed in the introduction by Alan Moore.

Bright vibrant colours are the hallmark of the art work. Justice League features very briefly. Also, it was very refreshing to read something from Alan Moore that did not feature a crazy anarchist or a dystopian society. This book is more individualistic.

It was an interesting book, so much that it did make me want to check out how do things pan out for Swamp Thing and his friend from Alec's past life, Mrs. Cable. In this book, however, her husband Matthew Cable's character is just hinted at. I think this is one character that will evolve to his full glory in next books of this series. ( )
  poonamsharma | Apr 6, 2013 |
The Swamp thing gets himself a girlfriend. Wait, I shouldn't have blurted out like this. But, this is not much of a spoiler since Swamp Thing edition by Alan Moore is rerun of original Swamp Thing popular issues. Yet, no prior knowledge is required.

Graphics are as before vibrant; colour and inking is as dark as possible. The one issue that I didn't like in this comic was Pog, with their Lewis Carrol-ish 'portmanteau words'. I thought that story interrupted the flow in the book as was bit annoying. But that is just me, it is, I am told, very popular series.

Then, there is a ride to hell where meeting with established DC comic characters takes place. Another horrifying issue was Mrs. Cable's hatred with her own body, smell and Black River Recorporations, which was also very well drawn. But any horror in the issue has been very sweetly matched with the Swamp Thing and his girlfriend's communion. Another well-drawn artwork. ;) ( )
  poonamsharma | Apr 6, 2013 |
Not quite as stunning as I'd expected from its reputation, but still pretty good. I guess I'm at a disadvantage coming at this from the wrong perspective: the only Swamp Thing I've ever read has been the powerful elemental creature, rather than the transformed Alec Holland. I suppose that it might have been more valuable to have read some of the earlier non-Moore volumes, if only to get a sense of the supporting cast and the original conception of Swamp Thing.

The horror stuff was pretty good, though, and I especially liked that victory was little more than a matter of pointing out that the relationship between plant and animal is symbiotic rather than parasitic. ( )
  jawalter | Nov 18, 2012 |
‘You shouldn’t have come here.’ (from the back cover)

The first four chapters are the best of this volume; the last three tell events improved in the next volumes of the saga of Swamp Thing.

‘He isn’t Alec Holland. He never will be Alec Holland. He never was Alec Holland. He’s just a ghost. A ghost dressed in weeds.’ (p. 33)
The Swamp Thing becomes aware of his nature: in a previous life he was an human being called Alec Holland, now in this new form he is only weeds and mud.
‘Woodrue ... he took ... my humanity ... away from me ... caused so much agony ... and when I thought the agony was ... over, that I found ... peace ... he tainted that as well ... Woodrue.’ (p. 72)
The Swamp Thing refuses to live as half man / half tree and he / it rooted in the swamp, becoming a vegetable.

Jason Woodrue becomes part of the swamp, and grows like a plant. Woodrue: ‘I am come to announce the Green Millennium.’ (p. 79) But this Green Millennium means destruction, so the Swamp Thing wake up to put order, aware that he is not anymore Alec Holland. ( )
  GrazianoRonca | Oct 10, 2010 |
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» Add other authors (11 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Moore, AlanWriterprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bissette, Steve R.Illustratormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Costanza, JohnLetterersecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Totleben, JohnInkersecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Wood, TatjanaColoristsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Zulli, MichaelCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Canonical title
Original title
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Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
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Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
It's raining in Washington tonight.
Quotations
He isn't Alec Holland. He never will be Alec Holland. He never was Alec Holland. He's just a ghost. A ghost dressed in weeds.
I? I am ... the Swamp Thing.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
The Finnish edition includes the story "Loose Ends", but is otherwise identical to the English edition.
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Blurbers
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Information from the Portuguese (Brazil) Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to the English one.
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Book description
Collecting classic tales from Alan Moore's award-winning run, this reprint series marks a high point in the history of graphic storytelling. Inspired by the creation of writer Len Wein and artist Berni Wrightson, Alan Moore took the character to new heights in the 1980s with his unique narrative approach. His provocative and groundbreaking writing, combined with masterly artwork by some of the medium's top artists, made Swamp Thing one of the great comics of the late twentieth century. This volume includes Moore's first seven issues, Saga of the Swamp Thing #21-27.
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Collects the first seven stories, in which Jason Woodrue begins his study of the Swamp Thing and ultimately discovers its origin and secrets.

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