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Around the Moon by Jules Verne
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Around the Moon (1870)

by Jules Verne

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Showing 5 of 5
Rarely has a sequel been so much worse than the original. While From the Earth to the Moon was one of my favorite 19th century science fiction works, this sequel was tedious, unimaginative and uninspiring. As a previous reviewer noted, Verne's attempt was little more than a bland cartographic journey of the moon. ( )
1 vote la2bkk | Aug 12, 2012 |
Amusing sequel which improves somewhat on From the Earth to the Moon. ( )
  markbstephenson | Jun 2, 2010 |
http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext93/moon10a.txt

"At this moment the bottom of the projectile deviated somewhat from the lunar surface, in order to follow the slightly lengthened elliptical orbit. From this point, had the earth been at the full, Barbicane and his companions could have seen it, but immersed in the sun's irradiation she was quite invisible. Another spectacle attracted their attention, that of the southern part of the moon, brought by the glasses to within 450 yards. They did not again leave the scuttles, and noted every detail of this fantastical continent."

http://freesf.blogspot.com/2008/05/around-moon-jules-verne.html ( )
  bluetyson | May 25, 2008 |
Everything appears larger than life, and while readers see the daily work of traveling in space, the view never detracts from the romance of space travel. Indeed, Verne constantly reminds his audience that the real adventure lies in the dreaming of such a feat and then making the dream come true. ...Around the Moon invites readers to wonder at what humanity is capable of achieving, and such an invitation is good for any era. -- Masterpieces of Science Fiction
1 vote Rickmas | Dec 24, 2006 |
This is the sequel to Jules Verne's earlier book, From the Earth to the Moon. Basically, we have a cartographic exploration of the lunar body, and exploration. Those aboard must also struggle to find a way back to Earth safely, so that they may continue to go on living, and not be the first human corpsicles on record.

http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/16457

http://freesf.blogspot.com/2006/11/around-moon-jules-verne.html ( )
  bluetyson | Nov 10, 2006 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Jules Verneprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Walter, Frederick PaulTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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During the year 186-, the whole world was greatly excited by a scientific experiment unprecedented in the annals of science.
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This is a short story, do NOT combine with the novel.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0804901821, Paperback)

What had happened? What effect had this frightful shock produced? Had the ingenuity of the constructors of the projectile obtained any happy result? Had the shock been deadened, thanks to the springs, the four plugs, the water-cushions, and the partition-breaks?--Follows From the Earth to the Moon.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:49:28 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

When Captain Nicholl finds himself with his two friends hurtling through space he makes the statement--"It's all very well to go to the moon, but how do we get back again"?

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