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A Princess of Mars (Penguin Classics) by…
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A Princess of Mars (Penguin Classics) (original 1912; edition 2007)

by Edgar Rice Burroughs (Author), John Seelye (Editor), John Seelye (Introduction)

Series: Barsoom (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
3,5801382,580 (3.58)1 / 265
Ex-Confederate Army captain John Carter finds himself suddenly and unwittingly transported to Mars while fleeing Apache Indians. This new world is populated by a race of monstrous Martians whose culture is based on the ability to fight for their race. Captured by the savage green men of Thark, John discovers that the gravitational difference between Mars and Earth has endowed him with the strength that he will need for survival on this hostile planet. He battles ferocious Martian creatures and gains the respect and friendship of the Barsoomians. Along the way he encounters the beautiful Dejah Thoris Princess of Helium, and earns her everlasting devotion.… (more)
Member:tmoore318
Title:A Princess of Mars (Penguin Classics)
Authors:Edgar Rice Burroughs (Author)
Other authors:John Seelye (Editor), John Seelye (Introduction)
Info:Penguin Classics (2007), Edition: Reprint, 224 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:to-read

Work details

A Princess of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs (1912)

  1. 40
    Sea-Kings of Mars and Otherworldly Stories by Leigh Brackett (paradoxosalpha)
    paradoxosalpha: Brackett was inspired by Burroughs and often does him one better.
  2. 20
    In the Courts of the Crimson Kings by S. M. Stirling (jseger9000)
    jseger9000: In the Courts of the Crimson Kings is an homage to Burrough's Barsoom books.
  3. 10
    The First Men in the Moon by H. G. Wells (artturnerjr)
    artturnerjr: Two early 20th century works of speculation on extraterrestrial life from two of the great unfettered imaginations of English-language literature.
  4. 10
    Almuric by Robert E. Howard (Michael.Rimmer)
  5. 00
    The Swordsman of Mars by Otis Adelbert Kline (Sylak)
  6. 12
    Elric of Melniboné by Michael Moorcock (artturnerjr)
  7. 01
    The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath by H. P. Lovecraft (artturnerjr)
  8. 13
    Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope by George Lucas (artturnerjr)
    artturnerjr: Anyone notice any similarities between the two?
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» See also 265 mentions

English (137)  Hungarian (1)  All languages (138)
Showing 1-5 of 137 (next | show all)
In post-Civil War Arizona John Carter has found a gold rich mine. His partner sets out to buy machinery to let them work it properly, but as he leaves the mine site he is set upon by a party of Apaches. Carter sets out to rescue him, but is too late, he does however manage to locate the dead body and free it from the clutches of the “evil injuns”. In doing so he himself is perused and, getting lost, ends up finding refuge in a cave. There he is overcome by something, and finds himself transported, naked, to the surface of the planet Mars.

He meets up with various Martians. Red ones and green ones. Intelligent ones and beast. None of them even half as civilised as a proper human of course.

And, he meets with the princess of the title.

Okay, so they say you should never judge a book by its cover, but I’m going to give you a moment to glance at that cover image. Take it all in. Now, make a judgement call. What do you think this book is like?

If you answered pulp adventure of the swords and sorcery variety with an unbelievable hero who saves the day and gets the girl, well, you’d be right. And if you further speculated that there was plenty of violence and that “the girl” in question was often to be found in distress, that means bonus points for you :)

It isn’t terrible. But it isn’t good. And it is full of dodgy colonial white-man knows best sentiment. Which might give me a topic for my coursera course, we’ll see. Oh, and anti-Bolshvevik sentiment. But if you can ignore all that then, yes, it does have plenty of adventure and derring-do, so if you are looking for that sort of thing, this is the book for you.

As for me? Well, I have to admit that I am sortof interested in reading more about the adventures of John Carter, and I’m definitely interested in the film that came out recently enough. It got a bit hammered in certain sectors but most people seem to say that it is a fine bit of entertainment too. So we will keep an open mind. ( )
  Fence | Jan 5, 2021 |
No-nonsense sci-fi swashbuckler. Being human on Mars apparently gives our hero John Carter an edge in fighting (some gravity thing) - and boy, does he fight to save the fair princess. Enjoyed it thorouhgly. ( )
  ctpress | Jan 5, 2021 |
Meh. Tarzan was much better than this. I want to continue that series, but I don't think I'll bother with any more volumes in this one.

Addendum: After having seen the movie I now conclude that it is far superior to the book. Pretty much everything I found annoying and wrong in the book is changed in the movie and the movie also actually gives the story a plot. I'm actually considering reading the sequel now just to see how they might handle a movie version of that. ( )
  bugaboo_4 | Jan 3, 2021 |
My husband is a big John Carter of Mars fan and his enthusiasm drove me to read some of the books in the series. He listened to the CDs, I read the paperbacks he had collected as a kid. We discussed what was going on as we were reading the books together.

I liked this book. It's not something I would have picked up on my own, but having someone excited about sharing this book with me made it fun to read. The writing is a bit old fashioned, sure. A little wordy perhaps and not tightly edited but that was before TV. People needed/wanted good, fun entertainment. A Civil War veteran waking up on Mars after exploring a cave for gold? What could be better??

Glad I read it. And the movie was very true to the books. Wish it had gotten better reviews! I was hoping for a sequel but that doesn't look like a possibility. I think the negative reviews might have been from people who hadn't read the books. ( )
  Chica3000 | Dec 11, 2020 |
Let me be honest, I loved every awful minute of this entire series of books. It's ridiculous, and so cool that I shared the librivox recordings of them with my husband who also loved their awful goodness. I really did not care about the bits that would not have flown in today's culture. I noted them, sure, but it did not spoil the fun for me in the least, probably because I did not take it seriously. This is a book for people who like silly, over-the-top adventures in another world filled with every trope imaginable. If plot holes bother you, there are a few, but they struck me as funny, and part of the charm of the story. Did you know that someone made a tabletop role-play game based on these books? Did you know that these books are out of copyright and can be found for free online? Well, now you do. And, as a side note, I enjoyed the movie, but the books were better. ( )
  Noeshia | Oct 23, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 137 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (140 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Burroughs, Edgar Riceprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Abbett, BobCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bradbury, RayIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brick, ScottNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
D'Achille, GinoCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hiekkala, OssiCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ilmari, SeppoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nelson, MarkNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pennington, BruceCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schoonover, Frank E.Illustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schoonover, Frank EarleCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sobez, LeniTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Whelan, MichaelCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Dedication
To my son Jack
First words
Foreword

To the Reader of this Work:
In submitting Captain Carter's strange manuscript to you in book form, I believe that a few words relative to this remarkable personality will be of interest.
I am a very old man; how old I do not know.
Quotations
"Was there ever such a man!"
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
This is the French version of "A Princess of Mars," even though the literal English translation of the French edition's title might suggest otherwise.
=============
Norman Bean is a pen name for ERB
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Blurbers
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Wikipedia in English (1)

Ex-Confederate Army captain John Carter finds himself suddenly and unwittingly transported to Mars while fleeing Apache Indians. This new world is populated by a race of monstrous Martians whose culture is based on the ability to fight for their race. Captured by the savage green men of Thark, John discovers that the gravitational difference between Mars and Earth has endowed him with the strength that he will need for survival on this hostile planet. He battles ferocious Martian creatures and gains the respect and friendship of the Barsoomians. Along the way he encounters the beautiful Dejah Thoris Princess of Helium, and earns her everlasting devotion.

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The Library of America

An edition of this book was published by The Library of America.

» Publisher information page

Tantor Media

3 editions of this book were published by Tantor Media.

Editions: 1400100186, 1400109108, 1452606781

Urban Romantics

2 editions of this book were published by Urban Romantics.

Editions: 1909676152, 1909676101

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