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Fighting Ruben Wolfe by Markus Zusak
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Fighting Ruben Wolfe (2000)

by Markus Zusak

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» See also 38 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
I have always had a problem with people who fight for money. The "sport" of boxing is incomprehensible to me. Mr. Zusak explains so much more than the sport. I think a lot of searching is done into the hearts of his characters. I'm already reading the next one. ( )
  ISCCSandy | Apr 9, 2019 |
I have always had a problem with people who fight for money. The "sport" of boxing is incomprehensible to me. Mr. Zusak explains so much more than the sport. I think a lot of searching is done into the hearts of his characters. I'm already reading the next one. ( )
  ISCCSandy | Apr 9, 2019 |
I adore Cameron Wolfe. What a fabulous young man. I hope to find out how he is doing in life! ( )
  .cris | Jun 15, 2016 |
Not as good as his other books. Guess he was still developing his "voice". He still manages to inject some of the subtleties that I loved in his other books which is what made this a bearable read. ( )
  douglasse2 | Jun 30, 2015 |
The Wolfe family is struggling. Cameron’s father is unemployed, his mother is working overtime to keep the family afloat, his sister is recovering from a broken heart by partying all night and his eldest brother Steve has decided to get a place of his own. Meanwhile Cameron and his brother Ruben join a local boxing league and are duking it out to make some extra money.

There’s so much more to this story than boxing or teenage angst. At its core it’s a poignant story of the bond between brothers. There are crushes on girls and dog racing in between those moments, but the most important story is that of Ruben Wolfe; a boy who can’t seem to find happiness despite winning his fights. His brother Cameron is the one who tells us the story and he is the antithesis to Ruben. When Ruben wins, Cam loses, when he gets a girl Cam inevitable loses one, yet the two provide a balance in each other’s lives. They both have an immense love and respect for the other and when one is in pain, the other can’t help but feel it.

“It’s funny, don’t you think, how time seems to do a lot of things? It flies, it tells, and worst of all, it runs out.” ( )
  bookworm12 | Sep 24, 2012 |
Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
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For Scout
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Celia Jellett for her kindness, commitment, and expertise
Vic Morrison for all the challenges
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The dog we're betting on looks more like a rat.
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It's funny, don't you think, how time seems to do a lot of things? It flies, it tells, and worst of all, it runs out.
We lean against the wall and the sun is screaming out in pain on the horizon. The horizon swallows it slowly, eating it up whole. All the city faces it, including my brother and me.
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0439241871, Paperback)

As Cameron and Ruben Wolfe walk home from school one day, a rough bloke awaits them at their gate. "Can we talk inside?" he asks.

"Well, for starters," Rube answers, "who the hell are y'?"

"Oh, I'm sorry," says the stranger. "I'm a guy who can either change your life or smack it into the ground for bein' smart."

The brothers decide to listen. They keep listening, and soon they're embroiled in a ruthless underground world of sleazy amateur boxing, 50 bucks for a win, a decent tip for a loss. The intensity of this kind of fighting goes beyond the obvious violence and danger, though, as Cameron wonders whether he even wants to come out from his brother's shadow and both boys seek an identity beyond that of their painfully harsh working class family's.

Markus Zusak pens a surprisingly complex and touching story that will linger long with readers. The language is hard-hitting, witty, and authentic--as are the emotions and action. Fighting Ruben Wolfe is not about boxing. It's about respect, stubborn pride, and real brotherly love. (Ages 12 and older) --Emilie Coulter

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:14:17 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Partly because of their family's poor finances and partly to prove themselves, brothers Ruben and Cameron take jobs as fighters and find themselves reacting very differently in the boxing ring.

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