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Death March (Yourdon Press Computing Series)…
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Death March (Yourdon Press Computing Series) (original 1997; edition 1997)

by Edward Yourdon

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229472,522 (3.73)None
Member:JFDausman
Title:Death March (Yourdon Press Computing Series)
Authors:Edward Yourdon
Info:Prentice Hall PTR (1997), Edition: 1st, Hardcover, 227 pages
Collections:Your library
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Death march by Edward Yourdon (Author) (1997)

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Tedious and repetitive, no useful info. ( )
  wweisser | Jul 6, 2013 |
If you are working at a place that believes in the Death March, you owe it to yourself to find time to read this book (not an easy thing when you are working 14 hours a day, seven days a week).

If you have never worked at such a place, you should at least skim the book to understand why you don't want to work for such an employee.

If you've survived a death march and now work at a saner company, you don't need this book in the least.

Word of warning: it is depressing to read this book and then see your employer is a textbook example of how not to run a software company.

Knowing what would happen, I scheduled a meeting with my manager and brought in the book with little sticky-notes on key pages. I then cataloged what the company was doing wrong and why it was bad.

They fired me, of course. In a month I was working for a fantastic start-up. I've been at that firm for five years now. We work hard, but we do not do death marches.

That other company? Dead and gone. ( )
1 vote fogllama | Mar 27, 2007 |
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0137483104, Hardcover)

Death march projects are becoming increasingly common in the software industry. The symptoms are obvious: The project schedule, budget, and staff are about half of what is necessary for completion. The planned feature set is unrealistic. People are working 14 hours a day, six or seven days a week, and stress is taking its toll. The project has a high risk of failure, yet management is either blind to the situation or has no alternative. Why do these irrational projects happen, and what, other than pure idiocy, leads people to get involved in them?

Edward Yourdon has produced a wise and highly readable book on the entire death march phenomenon and the best way to steer through one. He takes a close look at the types of projects that often become death marches and the corporate politics and culture that typically produce them; Yourdon helps you examine your own motivations and those of corporate managers who enable death marches to take shape.

Much of Death March is about the human element of highly stressful projects. The author's plain-spoken observations on the dysfunctional organization--the Machiavellian politics, naive optimism, lust for power, fear, and sheer managerial stupidity that guide so many death marches--make for a refreshing change from other project management books. You'll also find much practical advice to help you survive, everything from negotiating with upper management to breathing life into faltering projects. He'll even help you determine if you should look for another job.

If you've ever worked in a death march situation or been a client of a company addicted to death march management, this book will help you understand what happened. More importantly, it will help you prepare for future encounters with death marches. Death March is highly recommended for anyone involved in software development.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:13:03 -0400)

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